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August 05, 1922 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1922-08-05

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No.. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

TIGHTEN ENTRANCE
REQUIREMENTS FOR
FRESHMEN IN 1922
HIGH SCHOOL GRADIUATES FACE
THREE NEW STIPULA-
TIONS
NO ACTUAL ACADEMIC
PREREQUISITES ADDED'
Maintainance of Continuous Prepar-
atory Work in High Schools
Aim of New Measure
Entrance requirements for freshmen
registering this fall will be somewhat
more stringent than last year, Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall announced yester-
day. The stringency does not consist
of additions to the previous academic
requirements for admission, but is a
"tightening up" of the regulations
which have hitherto been in effect, in
the fom of three additional stipula-
tions.
Following the report of a sub-com-
mittee of investigation on "the causes
of freshman failures" and "preparation
for college," three clauses have been
added to the requirements for admis-
sion, which are intended to encourage
a more thorough preparation of the
high school student.
Discourage Poor Students
The first of the three new conditions
which will appear in the new Univer-
sity catalogue under the head of "Re-
quirements for Admission," states that
"the grade for recommendation should
be distinctly higher than that for grad-
uation." ' This measure, according to
Dr. Hall is intended to discourage the
recommendation of poor high school
students to the University .
The second measure provides that
the applicant must have obtained to
his credit "as a minimum, five units
regularly scheduled for the third and
fourth years of the high school cur-
riculum." The purpose of this provis-
ion,. Dr. Hall said, is to "secure better
quality and greater continuity of pre-
paratory work, and to discourage the
pupil's too frequent habit of occupy-
ing his (high school) junior and senior
years with disconnected and elemen-
tary studies."
Must Make Up Prerequisites
The third addition requires that all
specially recommended graduates, of
schools especially approved by reason
of the results of inspection and pre-
cedents of good scholarship establish-
ed in the University by former gradu-
ates, may be admitted without one or
more of the prescribed units, "will be
required to pursue throughout their
freshman year a third continuation, or
major high-school subject closely al-
lied to the department of study omit-
ted."
Dr. Hall explained that this measure
will bring high school students to
realize that although they may be able
to graduate from high school by mer-
it of credit not required for entrance
in the University, that the subjects
which they are lacking must be tak-
en some time before their graduation
from college. The supposition is that
the student will decide to eliminate his
share of elementary work before en-
tering college.
A copy of the University require-
ments for admission including the
added "stringencies" will be forward-
ed to high school principals through-
out the state within a short time, ac-

cording to Dr. Hall.
The sub-committee which formu-
lated the provisions was composed of
Prof. W. G. Smeaton, of the chemis-
try department; Prof. W. A. Frayer,
of the history department; and Prof.
D. H. Davis of the geology depart-
ment.

G4ALSWORTHY PERFORMANCE DISPLAYS
VERSATILITY OF OPEN AIR PLAYERS

(By Portia Goulder)
That the Shakespeare Playhouse
cast is versatile was proved last
night when they gave their second
play, "The Pigeon," a wide departure
from the Shakespearean drama of the
previous night. The tragi-comedy,
lresenting the unsolved social prob-
lems of the day, was more subtle and
lent itself even more to the ability
of the actors than their first per-
formance in the open air theater.
The perfect balance of the cast was
so noticeable that there was no out-
standing star unless mention could
be made of Harry Neville, the rum-
UTILITIES BODY
PARS WITH COURT
Member of Engineering Faculty Be-
lieves Efficiency of State Men
Equal to Highest Court
PROF. H. E. RIGGS COMPARES
METHODS OF 2 FUNCTIONARIES
Prof. H. E. Riggs, of the civil eng-
ineering department, is of the opinion
that problems considered by the public
utilities commission of a state received
mucih more thoughtful, courteous at-
tention than those passed upon by the
interstate commerce commission.
Had Personal Experience
"I know from my personal experi-
ence that the members of the public
utilities commissions of Michigan, Wis-
consin, Indiana, and Georgia are on
a par wth those of the supreme court.
I have as much confidence in their
judgment, said Professor Riggs. "When
a problem is brought up for consider-
ation before the public utilities com-
mission one is not only sure of seeing
at least one member of that commis-
sion but also' of getting a courteous
hearing, and some evidences of inter-
est in his case. On the other hand
when a problem is brought up before
the interstate commerce commission,
one probably never sees a member of
the commission but simply some em-
ploye hired to review the case, send
in a report, which may or may not
eventually be read by some one of the
commission, and then his problem is
passed upon without further investi-
gation. The way a case fares, then,
depends to a great extent upon the
way it happens to strike the employe
in question who is to report on it."
The interstate commerce commis-
sion covers such a variety of problems
that it is impossible for any one mem-
her to know what is going on at a giv-
en time or one tenth of it," continued
Professor Riggs.
Decisions Hurried
Professor Riggs cited one instance
of the action of a man representing
the interstate commerce commission
in passing on three cases concerning
in passing on three cases which had
some points and arguments in com-
mon. For this reason the three, one
concerning property in Buffalo, one
in Cleveland, and oe in Pittsburg,
had been called for a hearing at the
same time. The representative came
in late, yawned, stretched, and when
told that the hearing would last about
three days, announced that it would be
finished up that afternoon, and by 2
o'clock that afternoon, too, because he
intended to go to the races. This is
not the attitude and treatment giv-
en by all members of this commission
however.
To Vote on Belle Isle Bridge Tracks
Detroit, Aug. 4.-The proposal to

lay street car tracks across the new
Belle Isle bridge will be voted here
at the primary elecetion on Sept. 12,
under an order of the council.

loving cabby wpose philosophy was
the result of years of drinking and
"sitting.''
Frank McEntee came up to his
usual standard of good. acting in por-
traying the whimsical, impractical
Wellwyn. There was a naturalness
and a smoothness that made the
character real.
Miss Sydney Thompson, the philan-
thropist's daughter, was the only
"sane" person in the play. Miss
Thompson has gained fame in this
country and abroad in the art of pre-
senting whole plays in monologue.
Guinevere, the cockney flower girl
in need of reform, was Miss Gertrude
Linnell. Miss Linnell is an artist as
well as an actress, having designed
stage settings and costumes for the
Greenwich Village theater when it
was first opened.
Ernest Rowan, who earlier this
season took leading juvenile roles
with Walter Hampden's company,
was the suave French vagabond with
a theory of life all his own. The
nielodious timbre of Mr. Rowan's
voice was one of the things that at-
tracted his audience.
Some of the idiosyncrasies of the
typical professor struck the audience
last night as extremely humorous
renditions.
BELIEVE CHICAGO CAR
STRIKE NEAR SOUTION
EMPLOYES AGREE TO WAGE CUT;
INSIST ON FORMER WORK-
ING CONDITIONS
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Aug. 4. - Union officials
and executives of the Chicago surface
lines agreed tonight to proposals
which, if accepted by the traction em-
ployes, would end the four day strike!
of surface lines and elevated em-
ployes.
It was stated the men's representa-
tives had agreed to a 70 cent maxi-
mum wage instead of the present 82.
cent wage, but that they retained the
eight hour day with over time for
all beyond the eight hours and also
retained working conditions effective
before the strike.
Ratification by the men, if given,
would allow cars to begin operation
by Sunday or Monday, it was said,
thus running the strike into the sixth
or seventh day.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Organized under an act of the state
of Michigan providing for the incor-
poration of associations not for pecun-
iary profit, the University Musical so-
ciety is now in its forty-third year. It
controls the University School of Mus-
ic, the Choral Union, and the Univer-
sity Symphony orchestra. Its purpose
is to "cultivate the public taste for
music." In 1888, when Dean Albert
A. Stanley came to Ann Arbor, the
society was reorganized as it stands
today. The School of Music is affiliat-
ed with the University in that credits
are interchanged betwen the two or-
ganizations.
Business Failures Slump
New York, Aug. 4. - Failures and
liabilities, generally speaking, con-
tinue to ebb, and from now on seem
likely to make more favorable com-
parisons with like periods one and
two years ago than they hitherto have.
Thus July failures as reporte to
Bradstreet's total 1,568, as decrease

of 5:3 per cent. from June and of
42 per. cent. from the peak month of
January this year, although still
showing an increase of 5.1 per cent.
over July a year ago.

UNIONSIOPERATORS
AGREE TO FUTRE
POWER OF B9OR
AUTHORITY OF DELEGATED BODY
ADMITTED SUPREME
HEREAFTER
BELIEVE MAJOR OBJECT
IS ALREADY ACHIEVED
Executives Deny Rumor That Poor
Condition of Engines
Impairs Service
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug .4. - The major
purpose of the administration's in-
tervention intthe railstrike was ac-
complished, a White House spokes-I
man declared today, when both rail
executives and shop craft union lead-
ers agreed to consider authority of the
railroad labor board as supreme in
future controversies.
A rumor that President Harding's
proposal of seniority as originally
presented to T. DeWitt Cuyler, differ-
ed in form from the draft rejected by
the meeting of the association, met
with denial at the White House.
As to the actual progress of the
strike, the association of railway ex-
ecutives tonight issued a statement
declaring that representatives of
striking railroad employes "were at-
tempting to arouse public opinon"
with "ridiculous stories about enor-
mous impairment in conditions on the
roads." They denied this and the
statement declared there were fewer
locomotives in bad order at July 1
than when the strike started.
A point of interest today was the
announcement that the Southern rail-
way operating officials would meet in
Washington tomorrow with the gener-
al chairman of the striking shop craft
to discuss the proposal of a separate
settlement.
BRITISH LABOR LEAfiE
SCORERSKSAE OF TITLES
WOULD MAKE EVERY PEER TEST-
IFY AS TO MEANS OF AC-
QUISITION
(By Associated Press)
London, Aug. 4.- James Ramsay
Macdonald, member of parliament for
Leicester and former chairman of the
Labor party, has some original ideas
as to how the party should deal with
the "sale of honors," a question that
has been much discussed of late.
"When the Labor party comes into
office," he writes, "one of the very
first spare days that falls to its lot
should be devoted to the setting up of
a committee with full powers to send
for papers and persons to ascertain
how much recent recipients of 'hon-
ors' have paid for their titles, and
who pocketed the money.
"I should deprive no man of his title
once he had bought it. But the pub-
lic ought to know how much he gave
for it, and that can be ascertained by
a committee of the house of commons,
endowed with the powers of a court.
Every peer created within the last
20 years should be asked to send under
oath a statement of his peerage trans-
actions, and, if information is sup-
pressed or falsified he should be pro-

secuted for perjury.
"No one who has bought a peerage
should be allowed to vote in the house
of lords, and should not be eligible
for election to any reconstructed sec-
ond chamber. All those who have
bought their way into the privy coun-
cil should be dismissed at once, and
that body should be purified again."

STUDENTS VISIT
PRISON TODAY
The Michigan State prison and the
gas and electric plants of the Consum-
ers' Power company will be visited to-
day by students on the twelfth Sum-
. mer session excursion.
Leaving Ann Arbor at 8:47 o'clock
this morning on a special car, from the
Huron street interurban station, the
party will arrive in Jackson shortly
before 10 o'clock. They will go im-
mediately to the prison, the tour of
which will occupy the entire morning.
The students will be the luncheon
guests of the Consumers' Power com-
pany, after which the power plant will
be visited.
SENATE FAVORS,
FORD SHOALS BID

ACTION IN COAL
STRIKE HELD UP
IBY PEACE MEET

i

Agricultural Committee Urges
Take Up Detroiter's Offer
of Purchase

U. S.)

SAY ACCEPTANCE WOULD BE
BIG SAVING FOR GOVERNMENT
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug. 4.- Acceptance
of Henry Ford's offer for purchase and
lease of the government's vast nitrate
and water power projects at Muscle
Shoals, Ala., was urged by Republican
and Democratic senators comprising a
minority of the senate agriculture com-
mittee in a report submitted today to
the senate. Strong protest was enterf-
ed by the senators against the accept-
ance of the government ownership
and operation plan proposed by Sen-
ator Norris of Nebraska, the commit-
tee's chairman.
The report was presented by Sen-
ator Ladd, Republican, North Dakota,
and was signed by Senators Capper,
Republican, Kansas; Harrison, Repub-
lican, Mississippi; Caraway, Arkan-
sas; Ransdell, Louisiana; Smith, South
Carolina, and Heflin. Alabama, Dem-
ocrats.
Project Costly to U. S.
It is estimated that the government'
had lost $3,000,000 at Muscle Shoals
since the armistice, by failure to de-
velop and operate the project, and de-
clared the quickest way to stop these.
"losses is to accept Henry Ford's of-
fer for the purchase and lease of the
government's Muscle Shoals, proper-
ties."
"Certain objections to the Ford of-
fer seem apparent," the report said,
"but we insist without fear of success-
ful contradiction that none of the ob-
jections to the Ford offer can be rem-
edied or solved by government owner-
ship and operation-by the govern-
ment going into the power business or
entering the uncharted and hazardous
field of operating nitrate plants at
Muscle Shoals in the producion of
nitrogenous and other commercial
fertilizers using electro chemical pro-
cesses, the commercial success of
which is yet controversial.
"Congress Should Accept"
"For congress to adopt such a pol-
icy when Henry Ford's offer makes it
unnecessary for the government to do
so," it continued, "would subject con-
gress to the just condemnation and
reproach of all sober-minded people."
The belief was expressed that every
member of the senate would agree with
the committee minority with reference
to the acceptance of Mr. Ford's pro-
posal when they consider the "present
fuel and transportation emergencies"
in the light of "development of such
great hydro-electric power as is found
at Muscle Shoals," adding that it "is
the only certain and permanent relief
in the future from the present paraly-
sis of American industry."

PRES. HARDING WILL WAIT UNTIL
MONDAY FOR CONFERENCE
REPORTS
RESULTS OF MEETINGS
'CONSIDERED POIGNANT
Introduction of Bill to Appoint Em.
ergency Commission Also
Delayed
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug. 4. - President
Harding probably will withhold ap-
pointment of a special commission to
effect a settlement of the coal strike
until after the conference in Cleve-
land Monday of miners and operators
from the central competitive field, It
was indicated tonight intadministra
tion circles. Coniderable importance
was understood to be attached by the
administrationdto the outcome of the
conference in relation to the national
coal situation and it was thought no
move would be made by the federal
government towards putting an end
to the controversy, until the outcome
of the conference was made known.
Congressional participation in the
coal dispute also will await the re-
sult of the Cleveland meeting, officials
revealed. Senator Borah, Republican,
Idaho, saw the President today and
discussed his proposed bill, to author-
ize the chief executive to appoint a
federal commission to arbitrate the
mine disagreements. A decision was
reached not to introduce the bill in
the senate until next week.
Indianapolis, Aug. 4. - Unless an
agreement ending the nation wide coal
strike results from the wage negotia-
tions, set to begin between operators
and union leaders next Monday at
Cleveland, the governors of all coal
producing states are to be called on'
to lay plans for the resumption of coal
mining.
This decision was reached here yes-
terday at a conference of officials of
four states, including Governor Mc-
Cray of Indiana, Governor Groesbeck
of Michigan, Governor Davis of Ohio,
and Lieut. Governor Ballard of Ken-
tucky. No specific plan was advanced
for bringing about a resumption of
coal production, but the conferees in-
dicated efforts might be made to open
the mines under military protection.
THIRTY HOUSES MOVED
FROM UNIVERSITY SITES,
STRUCTURES TO BE REPAIRED
AND SOLD IN NEW LOCA-
TIONS
Under the direction of the Ann Ar-
bor Asphalt Construction company, a
general exodus of residences from the
newly acquired property of the Uni-
versity is taking place. This company
has bought all the houses, some 35 in
number, which are situated on the
property where the new model high
school, the engineering shops, and new
medical building, are to be located,
and are moving them to new sites.
The houses are to be repaired, and
put into first class condition, with all
modern conveniences, and wiltbe for
sale when on their new locations.
Thus far 30 have been- moved, at an
average of two a week. Seven house.
have been placed on Division street,
between Hill and Cross, one on White
street, one on Geddes avenue, and 21
on Washington Heights, near the new
University hospital. The work was be-
gun last March.

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/lI LAST DAY OF SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL IN OPEN AIR CAMPUS THEATRE
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 4 O'CLOCK, SHAKESPEARE'S "TWELFTH NIGHT"
RESRVD EAS,75 ^SATURDAY NIGHT, 8 O'CLOCK, BARRIE'S "THE ADMIRABLE CRICHTON";GNRLAMSI, c
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