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August 03, 1922 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-03

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, :AUGUST 3,

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, AUGUST 3,

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER 0OFTHE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
*law. matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $1. so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
:Manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ................LEO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor..................................James B. Young
Night Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
Women's Editor .............................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorial Board................Herbert S. Case, Elizabeth Nylund
Humor Editor ...............................Donald Coney
Literary Editor ...............................G. D. Eaton
Assistants

W. B. Butler
Portia Goulder

C. R. Trotter
Sidney Kripke

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising.............................Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication...............................George W. Rockwood
Accounts.........................:.......Laurence R. Favrot
Circulation............................... Edward F. Conlin
Assistants

Philip H. 'Goldsmith
Alma E. Young

Katherine E. Styer
B. Watson Shoesmiith

THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1922
Night Editor-JAMES B. YOUNG
Assistant-R. C. Trotter
HA, DESMOND, SO YOU REFUSE?
Strikes, strikes, strikes ! In Chicago the street
car workers are on strike, in New York 5o,ooo cloak
makers walked out, on the Great Lakes the sailors
and freight handlers have stopped sailing and handl-
ing freight, and all over the country railroad shop
eniployees are engaged in an indeterminate struggle
with their employers to see which can hold out the
longest. Strikes, strikes, strikes ! And in the mean-
time, while the industrial belligerents are having it
out with each ot.her, the public stands by and gazes
with wonder and fast-dying patience at the spectacle
of a nation on strike.
The railroad strike, however, is the most serious
of all, for without transportation even the looms
cannot spin, and even a temporary let-up in indus-
try is a grave handicap to a nation's industrial pro-
gress. The federal government drew up proposals
looking to an arbitrary settlement by calling two
meetings, one of the union leaders and the other of
the 'road executives. The union men, meeting in
Chicago, have already indicated their willingness to
accept the administration's plan, but, strange though
it may seem, the employers have refused, on the
grounds that they do not consider it just to enter
into an agreement whereby the strikers will be re-
turned with full seniority rights. The question of
seniorityis one which has been a constant source
of agitation to workers and employers, for if the
strikers lose their priority rights and win the strike,
they have lost their most valued prerogative, after
all.
A strike is recognized as a rightful means of any
group of employees to secure justification of any
wrongs inflicted upon them by their employers.
Thus,, then, if the strike is ended, and the points of
disagreement are successfully met, the men have a
just right to expect that their former privileges will
be restored to them. This, however, the road lead-
ers object to, and in their stubbornness are adding
further obstacles to the possibility of a quick and
peaceful settlement. The time for quibbling has
ended-one side or the other must make conces-
sions and leave the less serious wrinkles to be
ironed out by a joint committee after the wheels of
industry are again humming. The laboring group
has agreed to accept the government's peace propos-
al-let the executives follow their example, or the
government will have to step in and settle the strike
without the consent o fthe owners. When labor, us-
ually considered erratic, agrees to arbitrate, capital
has little argument for refusing to give its share.
The worm is turning-and this time it is labor, and
not capital, which is the early bird.
LEARN TO LEARN
Why is it that some students can spend their
evenings dancing, their afternoons on the river or
playing tennis, and still pass all their courses with
very fair marks, while others must spend all their
time grinding over their text books and then very
often do not receive more than passing grades?
This question is an interesting one and one that by
many is recognized as being a stickler. However,
according to the psychologist, the question is a com-
paratively simple one to answer, necessitating only
the explanation of two methods of learning-the
rote, and the logical.
Those who keep their noses to the abrasive discs
of knowledge, without having its effect noticeable

on their classroom reports, are not necessarily to be
condemned for ignorance. It is very often that
these people are perfectly normal, but, to put it
clearly, they have not learned how to learn. The
average college student has a mental capacity cap-
able of grasping the logical method of learning, but
he fails to develop this method, either because he
has been taught the other in high school, or finds
logical learning slightly more difficult.
The acquisition of a study by logical learning is
the opposite of word-for-word memorizing, and
involves the complete understanding of a funda-
mental and the ability to apply to and explain by
the fundamental, problems or things relative to it or
dependent upon it. There are a number of courses
offered in the University that can be learned only
through roteilaerning, such as courses that depend
upon the remembrance of cold and bare facts. The
freshman year in any college is always the most dif-
ficult, and primarily because the first year man does
not know how to study. College professors are as a
rule not extraordinary teachers, for the ability to
teach is not demanded of them. What they must
have is a complete knowledge of their course and
the college student is considered sufficiently mature
to be able to grasp his knowledge in whatever form
or shape it may be presented to him, and arrange
it in a logical manner.
There are a great many hours actually wasted over
text books, hours that could be used to advantage on
other subjects. And there always will be wasted
hours over studying, until the grinding type of stu-
dent learns how to learn.
Dr. May called up the office and told us that we
were getting all the rain yesterday and the gym-
nasium district was dry. We watched the clouds,
and soon the "worm turned." He who laughs last
laughs best, Doc.
Strike items are gradually crowding the About
Town column out of business. If a little strike vis-
its you please call the office.
............................. . w. oww .. . .......... ..w.ww..w .:...- -
THE FRYING PAN
"-a flash in the Pan."
Personally Mentioned
Passing by the School of Music yesterday
On his way to the Press building,
Evan Throop inadvertently flicked the end of his
cigarette
Into the open window of a basement practice room
Where Ethelbert Killingsworth was doing
His daily stunt at the chromatic scale.
The yet-burning end of the coffin-nail
Lodged in the ear of young Killingsworth,
Who is a peculiarly inoffensive youth,
Measuring only five inches around the biceps.
Nevertheless he was so enraged that he
Burst out of the window and pursued Throop
Into the middle distance and mauled him
Unmercifully. It is rumored that Cauliflour Jenks,
The well-known fight backer is attempting to sign
him on
To meet Tendler.
Throop is convalescing with a bitten ear.
"Erring Couples Hide in Closets; Divorces
Next." In life they hide in closets and a divorce
follows; on the stage they hide in closets and a
farce follows.
Gallows-Meat
The flotsam who thinks humor consists in saying,
"Did you know the Huron is a damned river?"
ETIQUETTE FOR THE INSTRUCTOR
Classroom Pointers
With all the books and newspaper publicity this
problem of etiquette is getting, the United States
bids fair to become the most etiquetted country on
the globe. We hope to further the good work in
this brief (but to the point) series of articles dealing

pith the common and often puzzling problems which
are bound to confront even the most well-bred in-
structor.
i. Coming to class. This is a matter that can-
not be too strongly dwelt upon. The instructor
should come to class. Otherwise he will disappoint
some of his class, and is apt to get into difficulties
with the authorities. Care should be taken, how-
ever, not to arrive to early, nor yet so late as to cre-
ate the impression among the more restless spirits
that he is not coming at all. This is, as we say, a
fine point.
2. Apparel Much the same clothing may be
worn in the classroom as is worn for street. The
hat, it is true, may be dispensed with, and if the in.
structor is financially strong enough to bear the
increased cost of laundry bills (and you know what
these laundries charge!) and if he wishes to create
a spirit of camaraderie among the men, he may dis-
pense with the coat. It is not advisable in most
cases to wear knickerbockers. We advise a consult-
ation with Dr. May first.
(Tomorrow-"The Problem of Recitations")
She -Alas, I fear I shall never see you in
Heaven."
The Inevitable He-Great guns ! What have you
been doing now ?"
"Ah, ha ! Woman, I have found you out at last !"
"Not this time, but you will the next time you
call."
CALIGULA.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIMlE TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Tine)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:oo
a. m., 7:00 a. m., 8:oo a. m.. :oo a. m. and
hourly to 9:05 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. m.
Local Cars, East Bound-5:55 a. m., 7:00
a. m. and every two hours to 9:cc p. m.
I :oo p. m. To Ypsilanti onbr-i: :4o p. im.,
12:25 a. in., 1:15 a. Mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound- 7:o a. m., 2:40
P. M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 1o:47, a. m.; 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 P. m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:47
n.

K

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1922
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AUGUST
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7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30 31

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25

1922
12
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26

Summer Students-
Secure your supplies at
STU DENTS SUPPLY STORE
1 11 1 South University Avenue
Materials for A 11Colleges

PANAMA AND STRAWHATS
CLEANED THE RtIGHT WAY
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for stiff straws....;.. .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
YOU WILL FIND THE
Farmers
and Mechanics Bank
A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAFE place
to transact your
business.
TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve

w

.. t

For Your Summer Reading
BOOKS
from
GRAHAM'S
Both 1tores

El

I

KODA K FINSHING4
Our prints are made on Velox.
Materials that are Eastman made and meth-
ods that are Eastman ap proved, plus the
experience of our experts are guaranties of
finest quality finishing.
Bring us yourfm

w

I I
- I I

TUTTLES

A place to bring your friends. Nowhere is
the food better; nowhere is the service
more prompt. Open all summer.
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

A fact-
You can eat at the
Arcade Cafeteria
(and get all you
want, too) with-
out banksupting
yourself.
The ARCADE
CAFETERIA

0 'BusinessT 'Bidng}
* T HE selling of commodities is fundamental in
every business, and selling life insurance af
muneration. For the life insurance salesman
is a business builder and finds innumerable ways to
serve the community and make himself indispensable
in the conduct of modern affairs.
The life insurance salesman is not only a business builder
but he is in business for himself, creating a competence per-
manent and continuous. It is the best paid work for those
who are ambitious and willing to work, and who have the
character and stamina necessary to stamp their individuality
upon the business and on their community.
The traditions and practices of the JoaN HANCOCK are such .
that the college graduate can take a peculiar pride, in represent-
ing this company. You are liable to remain in the business
you enter on leaving college. Before making a definite deci-
sion inquire into life insurance as a career. Write, "Agency
Department.'
U
g
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
Or BOSTON. MASSACNUs£I-s
SLargestFiduciary Institution in New England
.* E.

Upstairs i n

Nickels Ar cade

,_

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