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August 03, 1922 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1922-08-03

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

1

PRICE 3M, CENT

VOL. XIII. No. 36

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1922

DRIBELL, FAMOUS
AS INVENTOR OF
TELEPHONE, DEAD
STRICKEN IN HIS NOVA SCOTIA
HOME AFTER LONG ILL-
NESS
INVENTION GREATEST
IN WORLD'S HISTORY
Idea First Scoffed at; 13,000,000 In-
struments in Use at Present
Time
(By Associated Press)
West Orange, N. J., Aug. 2.-Thomas
A. Edison today paid the following
tribute to his fellow inventor, Alex-
ander Graham Bell:
"I am sorry to learn of the death
of Alexander Graham Bell, the in-
ventor of the first telephone. I have
always regarded him very highly, es-
pecially for his extreme modesty."
Sydney, N. S., Aug. 2.-Dr. Alexand-
er Graham Bell, inventor of the tele-
phone, died at 2 a. m. today at Beinn
Breagh, his estate, near Baddock.
Although he had been in failing
health for several months, he had not
been. confined to bed and the end
was unexpected. Late yesterday aft-
ernoon, however, his condition became
serious. Dr. Kerr, of Washington, a
cousin of Mrs. Bell, who was a guest,
and a Sydney physician attended him.
With Dr. Bell when he died were
Mrs. Bell, a daughter, Mrs, Marian
Hubbard Fairchild, and her husband,
David G. Fairchild, of Washington. The
inventor leaves another daughter, Mrs
Eliza M. Grosvenor, wife of a Wash--;
ington magazine editor.I
Dr. Bell will be buried on top oft
Mt. Beinn Breagh, a spot chosen. byf
himself.
Alexander Graham Bell lived to see
experiments which he began with a
dead man's ear less than 50 years ago
result in a means of communication
for millions of long distance telephoned
conversations daily in all parts of the
world. The possibility of talking ove'
a wire, ridiculed then as a dream byt
almost everybody except Bell, became
during his lifetime a reality common-c
place and marvellous. v
The Bell basic patent, known inv
the records at Washington as No. 174,-..
465 has been called the most valuableg
single patent ever issued in the whole
history of invention. There are today
Dore than 13,000,000 telephone instru-
ments through which billions of tele-
phone conversations are carried on
each year.e
Inventing a Family Hobby u
Means of communication had beenu
a hobby in the Bell family long beforeB
the inventor of the telephone wast
born. Two generations back, Alex-o
ander Bell became noted for invent-S
ing a system for overcoming stammer-C
ing speech, while his son, Alexander
Melville Bell, father of the inventorA
of the telephone, perfected a systemo
of visible speech.1
With this heritage, the son, born inG
Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1847, under-
took similar experiments while stillc
a lad. He construceted an artificial
skull of gutta-percha and Indian rub-
ber that would pr.onounce several
words in weird tone, when blown into
by a hand bellows. At the age of 16t
he became, like his father, a teacherf
of elocution, and an instructor of deafu
mutes.e

Bell reached a crisis in his life atu
the age of 22, when he was threaten-
ed with tuberculosis. The white
plague caused the death of his twos
brothers and the Bell family migratedp
to Brantford, Canada.
A meeting at that time with Sirc
(Continued on Page Four) p

Last Concert Of
Summer Offered
Perfection in tone and harmony
characterized the last of the series
of Wednesday evening concerts given
during the summer by the School of
Music. The program consisted of
light and airy numbers mespecially
well chosen for a summer concert.
None of the selections needed either
force or exceptional volume to dis-
play their excellence. The Choral
Union program was given under the
direction of George Oscar Bowen.
Mrs. Leslie G. Lamborn, soprano, of
Royal Oak, rendered a number from
"La Sonambula" by Bellini and re-
sponded to an encore. Mrs. Lamborn
was also the soloist in the Choral
Union rendition of "The Banner of
St- George" by Elgar. Mrs. Lam-
born's voice was especially well
adapted for this part.
Mrs. Emma Fisher-Cross, the pi-
anist on the program, displayed
splendid technique by Strauss-Schutt,
Mendelssohn-Liszt and Chopin.
Mrs. George B. Rhead and Miss
(Continued on Page Four)
REED APOINTE
FACULTY MEMBR
Author of Three Works on American
Government to Teach Civic
Administration
WAS FORMERLY ON STAFF OF
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
Prof. T. H. Reed, of the political sci-
ence department of the University of
California, who is a member of the
Summer session faculty, has been
made a permanent member of the Un-
iversity faculty, according to advices
from the office of President Marion L.
Burton.
To Teach Municipal Government
Professor Reed's duties will be con-
fined entirely to the field of municipal
government, while Prof. Robert Crane.
who is conducting these classes, will
devote his time to political theory.
Professor Reed is an authority on
reconstruction conditions in Belgium,
having spent several months studying
the post bellum situations in that
country. He is acting as co-editor
with President Burrowes, of the Uni-
versity of California, in the prepara-
tion of a series of books on European
governments. A text of the "Govern-
ment and Politics of Belgium," of
which Professor Reed is the author
will appear among the new works.
Graduate of Harvard
The new faculty member of the lit-
erary and law departments is a grad-
uate of Harvard university. Since grad-
uation he has held many positions in
public service. In 1911 he was execu-
tive secretary to Gov. Hiram Johnson,
of California, later city manager of
San Jose, Calif., and president of the
California city planning conferences.
He is the author of three works on
American governments: "Government
of the People," "Loyal Citizens" and
"Forms and Functions of American
Governments." Professor Reed lec-
tured Tuesday night on Belgium's re-
construction, in Natural Science audi-
torium.
Miss Murphy Takes Vacation
Miss Natalie Murphy, secretary to
the President, will leave next Monday
for Marshall, where she will remain

until Aug. 15, when she will be join-4
ed by Dean Alfred Lloyd, of the Grad-
uate school, and his family. The party
will then motor to Piseco in the Ad-
irondack mountains, where they will
spend the remainder of the vacation
period.
Dean John R. Effinger, of the literary
college, has been at Piseco for the
past three weeks.

CITIZENS REVEL
AS CAR STRIKE
GRPS CHICAGO
LACK OF TRANSPORTATION OF
NO CONCERN TO
WORKERS
CITY IS TURNED INTO
. JOYOUS MARDI GRAS
Armistice Day Celebration Tame in
Comparison with Windy City
Observance
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Aug. 2.-Caught without
transportation by the most complete
street car and elevated strike in Chi-
cago's history, nearly 1,000,000 Loop
and wholesale district toilers Tues-
day night turned demoralizing chaos
into wild carnival and staged the
most reckless Mardi Gras this city
remembers.
Not a' street car or elevated train
wheel turned during the day and the
second biggest city in the country
took on the aspect of a beleaguered
ciy. One hundred thousand automo-
biles, including trucks heavily laden
with perspiring mobs work-bound,
poured into the Loop and jammed
every street with traffic that became
so heavy it was unmanageable. Miles
of automobiles crammed as close to-
gether as they could be, moved at
snail's pace all day long.
Cars Crowd Streets
When the night rush hour arrived
and offices poured out hundreds of
thousands of workers, every street in
down town Chicago was a black mass
of humanity, while motor vehicles
crowded the thoroughfares from gut-
ter to gutter.
At this moment heavy showers of
rain broke loose over the struggling
masses. Instantly there were wild
dashes for hotels, restaurants, caba-
rets and any other place offering ref-
uge. There were dances in thotel
lobbies, every seat in gay cabarets
was at a premium, and the entire
downtown district seemed to enter in-
to the Mardi Gras spirit.
Rain No Hindrance
Groups of gay young stenographers
proceeded down the streets singing
and "kidding the world." Dresses
ruined by the rain were laughed
over. Men with umbrellas quickly
found charming company. The city-
wide campaign against "boulevard
vamps" also went into the discard and
young women rushed any automobile
with an empty seat that was headed in
their direction.
Hundreds of trucks lined the
streets, fitted out with pine seats and
these were quickly filled with a car-
nival crowd. One group of girls rid-
ing in a truck usually earning its
gasoline as a vegetable wagon start-
ed singing "We Won't Get Home Un-
til Morning," and thousands took up
the refrain, making more noise than
the usual rush and traffic din.
DEAN KRAUS LEAVES TODAY
TO VISIT SUMMER CAMPS
Dean Edward H. Kraus, of the Sum-
mer session, left this morning for
Douglas Lake, where he will visit the
engineering, camp and the biological

station.
On Saturday Dean Kraus will speak
to the biologists on the advisability of
moving the site of the camp at some
future time. A committee reported
favorably for a change several years
ago. Dean Kraus will return to Ann
Arbor Monday night.

Kin scella Class
To Give Recital
Demonstration of the Kinscella
method of teaching piano in classes
will be given at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
Pattengill auditorium by Miss Hazel
Gertrude Kinscella, who has been con-
nected with the public school music

L
i
l
f

REFUSAL OF ROAD EXECUTIVES MAY
CAUSE 45,9000 MAINTENANCE-OF-WAY
MEN TO JOIN RANKS OF STRIKEI

f

methods department of the School of
Music during the summer. Miss Kin-
scella has been conducting classes for
the past three weeks.
Besides the class lesson, which will
include staff (building, note-reading,
transposition and key drills, a short
recital will be given by some of the
more advanced pupils. The program
will be as follows:
Ding, Dong Bell .........Kinscella
Enid Alexander
At the Party ..............Kinscella
Verna Dorrow........
Marching On ...............Kinscella
Andrew Mast
Lightly Row ..............Folk Song
Air ......................Mozart
Evening Song ..............Kinscella
Cecil Poor
Piano ensemble-(Five pianos)
Tiny Waltz ..............Kinscella
Ding,Dong Bell ..........Kinscella
America.
R, 0. T , CONTINGENT IS
NIGH INRMY RTING
~Summer session at the various R.
0. T. C. camps closed July 26, with
Michigan holding her own among the
other 14 universities and colleges rep-
resented at the camps, according to
Maj. Robert Arthur.
At Fort Monroe, Va., where the ma-
jority of R. 0. T. C. students have been
located, Michigan ranked third in at-
tendance with 32 men. Six men in the
coast artillery corps have satisfactor-
ily completed the course of instruction
in the basic camp, and 25 men have
finished the course in the advance
camp. One student was relieved be-
cause of illness due to an injury re-
ceived in high school football.
Eight men received permanent ap-
pointments in battery D, the company
to which the Michigan men belong.
This battery tied for first place in the
following events: Artillery exclusive
of target practice, fixed artillery target
practice,,railway artillery target prac-
tice, infantry ceremonies, and guard
mount.
KNOW 1YOUR1,UNIERSITY
"Regents Field" was the name of the
University's athletic grounds when
Coach Fielding H. Yost came here in'
1901. In 1904 when D. M. Ferry of
Detroit, gave the money for the pur-
chase of 20 additional acres of land,
the name was changed to Ferry field.
The football grounds on the old Reg-
ents field were at about the middle of
the present field, and near the ground-
keeper's house, with stands seating
.1,500 people. The last game playedl
there was with Wisconsin, which
Michigan won by a score of 12 to 0, in
1905.
The concrete stand was erected in
1914.- With the addition of other build-
ings and athletic facilities, the athletic
plant here is now the equal of any
in the country. Every cent of the
money in the building of this plant
has come out of athletic earnings.
Tennis Tourney Continues
Weather permitting, the wind-up of
the third round of singles and doubles
in the tennis tournament will be held
today. It is imperative that this round1
be closed in order that the semi-finalsl
can begin at the end of the week. I

BURTON TO SPEAK
AT LEGION MEET
President Marion L. Burton will
speak at 4 o'clock on Sept. 5 in the
Michigan Union before the meeting
of the second district association of
the American - Legion, which will
convene here for a three day session
on Sept. 4, 5, and 6.
The meeting will include delegates
from Jackson, Lenawee, Monroe, and
Washtenaw counties, and some from
Wayne county.-
The subject of President Burton's
address has not yet been announced.
STUDENTS VIIT FORD
RIVER ROUGE PLNTS
Leaving Ann Arbor yesterday aft-
ernoon, Summer session students ar-
rived in Detroit shortly before 2
o'clock to visit the River Rouge
plants of the Ford Motor company.
This is the plant that has been called
the Krupp works of America from the
standpoint of modern equipment and
output capacity. Automobiles met the
car and transported more than 25
men to the by-product units, the first
to be seen. Then the party observed
the 125 coke ovens by which part of
the city of Detroit is supplied with
illuminating gas.
The outstanding points of interest
were the two blast furnaces each
with a capacity of 500 tons, which re-
fine the ore to supply the Ford plants
with pig iron, later to be cast or turn-
ed into steel. These furnaces rise to
a height of more than 75 feet and
may be seen for miles.
The tourists, after going 'through
the gigantic foundries, inspected the
Fordson tractor plant and the body
factory which supplies most of the
bodies for the Highland Park plant.
Besides seeing the huge boilers burn-
ing pulverized 'coal, and the great
power plant, the students observed in
operation the huge devices which un-
load ore and coal from the barges
and ore-boats which sail up the can-
al from the Detroit river.
STUDENTS TO HOLD
FINAL REHEARSALS
From all appearances the two plays
which the class in Play Production is
preparing under the direction of
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister are thoroughly
adapted to the talent of the class.
Work on both of the plays is pro-
gressing rapidly, and the casts will
soon be ready for final rehearsals,
preliminary to the public presenta-
tion, which will be Thursday and
Friday evenings of next week.
. The members of the cast for "The
Melting Pot" are working on their
parts. Several members have appear-
ed before in public presentations of
the same play.
The cast for "The Rivals" is like-
wise moulding the work into form
for presentation, and will soon be
ready for the dress rehearsals.
Tickets for the public performanc-
es are now on sale at Wahr's, reserv-
ed seats being 75 cents, while gener-
al admission is 50 cents. Many of the
seats have already been sold.
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd Returns
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, of the Grad-
uate school, returned yesterday from
Montclair, N. J., where he was called
recently by the death of his mother.

GOVERNMENT ACTION SEEKIN
SETTLEMENT HELD
IN CHECK
SENIORITY QUESTION
IS STILL UNSETTLEI
Fuel Emergency Commission Pla
Given Out by Fuel Chief
Spencer
(By Associated Press)
New York, Aug. 2.-A strike of 45,
000 maintenance-of-way' men on th
New York Central "within a week
was predicted here today by Wi
liam M. Parker, chairman of the sys
tem organization, as the result bf th
roads refusal to accept Presiden
Harding's plan for settlement of th
shop craft strike.
Washington, Aug. 2.-Further gov
ernment action in the railroad strik
was held in abatement today althoug
railroad executives who refused Pres
ident Harding's suggestions for set
tlement today were understood t
have advised administration agencie
that the door was still open for nego
tiations.
If protection in seniority status ac
quired by shopmen who have contin
ued to- work in spite of the strik
could be guaranteed, any basis of set
tlement the President might find fai:
would be considered by the manage
ment, it was said.
Negotiations during the day, it wa
added, had brought no immediat
tangible results.
Await Further Word
The result was said to be awaiting
the text of the reply which unio
leaders at Chicago were drafting t
the settlement proposal.
Secretary Hoover, who attended th
session of the road executives at Ne
York, saw Mr. Harding at his retur
today, but said that no immediat
governmental steps were to be ex
pected. Other cabinet members wh
saw the President for discussion o
strike matters indicated that thi
claims of railroad managements as ti
ability to maintain transportatioi
would get a test during the next fe
days.
It was again emphasized, however
that the nation's necessities 'for a
least the coal supply, had likely gov
erned the President's action in the
rail strike to date.
Coal Plans Announced
Government plans for distributio
of coal during the existing emergn
cy were announced- tonight by Fue
Distributor Spencer after conferenc
with Secretary Hoover and the cen
tral committee appointed by Presi
dent Harding. The federal organiza
tion in Washington, he said, will car
ry the distribution of available sup
plies among the railways, federal in
stitution and state, while the govern-
ors of the states will handle local sup
ply.
Pending completion of the federa
organization, Mr. Spencer said, three
immediate stages will ensue-firs
the continuation of the normal busi.
ness by the operators, then priorit
buyers under the inter-state corn
merce commission service orde:
number 23 will gradually encroac
upon operators business and finally
coal orders placed through the feder
al fuel distributor will. absorb th
entire output of the mines.
Robbins to Return Monday
Dr. Frank Robbins, assistant to th
President, who has been spending hi
vacation in Westfield, Mass., will re
turn to Ann Arbor on Monday.

SHAKESPEARE PLAYHOUSE Presents in Open Air Campus Theatre, at POPULAR PRICES:
Thursday Night, Aug. 3rd, 8 o'clock, Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew" Saturday Afternoon, Aug. 5th, 4 o'clock, Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night"
Friday Night, Au 4th, 8 o'clock, Galsworthy's "Pigeon" Saturday Night, at 8 o'clock, Barrie's "The Admirable Crichton"
Reserved Seats, 75 Cents. General Admission, 50 Cents. Reserved Seats for four performances, $2.25.
Advance seat sale at Wahr's Book Store. State street.

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