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August 01, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-01

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DAY AND 3

No. 34.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1922

PRI

GATE POSSIBLE
ARAT E PEACE
TH COAL MINERS
AL COMMITTEE CONFERS
H OPERATORS ON SUP-
PLIES QUESTION
RNMENT A G E N TS
K FOR SETTLEMENT
be Held Monday In Cleveland
s Toward Clearing Situa-,
tion in Four States

C

WHAT ISSCIENCE?
ASKS SLEATOR
It Is a Social Device for. Intentional
Progress, Decides Physics
Professor
"SPIRIT AND ESSENCE OF
WHAT WE C4LL ADVANCEMENT"
"Science is a social device by means
of which an individual may progress
intentionally." With this as a prelim-
inary definition, Prof. W. W. Sleator,
of the physics department, developed a
solution of the query, "What is Sci-
ence?" in a Summer session lecture at.
at 5 o'clock yesterday in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium..
Professor Sleator 'emphasized the
distinction between organic evolution
and social progress, that in the form-
er, Zose organisms in which the
changes appear are unconscious of the
part they play in the whole progres-
sion, while the contrary is true in the
case of social progress.
"The acquisitive nature of social

STUDENTS INVITED
TO WEEKLY PARTY
Open house for students and faculty
of the',Summer session will be held
from 4 to 5:30 o'clock this afternoon
at the Chi Omega house, 1503 Wash-
tenaw, one of the women's residences
open this summer. Heretofore these
weekly gatherings have taken place at
the dormitories.
Miss Helen C. Bishop, Mrs. Thomas
E. Rankin, Mrs. Wilbur R. Humphreys,
and Mrs. Edwin C. Goddard will be
hostesses. As this is one of the last
opportunities for summer school stu-
dents to get together before the close
of the session, a 'large attendance is
expected.
Punch and wafers will be served and
those who wish to dance may do so.
The parties have been in the nature of
meeting places for students who oth-
erwise would see each other only in
classes.
These parties are not given for any
special organization but all students
are cordially invited.
*
Choral Union To
IAppear In ial
Faculty Concert

FEDERAL ATTEMPT TO0 CONCLUDE
NATION WIDE WALKOUT WIL
BE-PUT TO DECIDING TEST 1

SETTLEMENT HINGES ON RESULT
OF MEETINGS OF LEAD.
RS
HARDING'S FIVE POINTS
DIVULGED BY OFFICIAL
Proposal Insists Workers Abide by
Decisions of Baliway Labor
BIaNd

GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
SEE STRIKE END IF ]
IS ACCEPTED
SENIORITY RIGHTS
IMPORTANT OF
Employers Maintali Strike
Deserve Preference I
Loyalty to Roads

I

(By Assdciated Press)}
Washington, July 31. - With the
federal agencies coal control machine
piloted by Fuel Distributor Spencer
finally under w.ay, the possiblity that
negotiation for a separate wage set-
tlement between the miners unions
anid some operators in Pennsylvania,
Ohio, Illinois and Indiana bituminous
fields might be instituted this week
was strongly indicated in Washington
tonight.
Representatives of the various gov-
ernmpnt departments and producing
operators co-operating unde'r the ad-
ministration's distribution plan set to
work on the initial problem facing op-
eration of the scheme, with organiza-
tions of regional committees in the
producing fields and formation of coal
pools.
U. S., Operators Confer
Members of the federal distributiont
committee also conferred today with
Cleveland operators on the quiestion of
supplies for the Great Lakes region,
but no statement was made as to con-
clusions reached by the conferees.
In Cleveland, it was understood, a
meeting will be held next Monday!
lookingto the settlement of the strike,
in Pennslyvania, Ohio, Illinois, and
Indiana.]
Outcome in Question
How extensive such a partial settle-
ment of the miners strike would be or
whether such a conference, lacking 'at
considerable number of employers ofl
larger forces of miners, would be suc-!
cessful at all remained questionable in7
official and semi-official views.
Ohio coal operators' associations are,
said to have been made a nucleus,
about. which Mr. Lewis was forming;
an interstate group with whom he
would shortly attempt to negotiate a]
wage scale.]
sUnion to Derend Herrin Slayers .
Springfield,( Ill., July 31.-The Illin-j
ois branch of the union mine workers
will "finance and erect the defense" of
every union member brought to trial]
for the Herrin massacre, Frank Far-]
rington, Illinois president, announced,
today.a
"The very magnitude and sternness of
the agitation for the punishment of
those involved in the rioting created
danger for innocent men," said Mr.
Farrington in a statement this after-
noon.
EDUCATION SCHOOL OFFERS
NEW YORK LICENSE TESTS
Arrangements have been made with
the department of education of the city
of New York to have their examination
for high school licenses given in the
University after the close of the Sum-
mer session.
The examinations will be given in
the School of Education at 9 o'clock
and at 1:30 o'clock on Aug. 21. Ec-
onomics, English, history, and mathe-
matics will be among the examination
subjects.
Students who wish to take the tests
must fill out blanks to that effect,
which will be forwarded to the board
of examiners in New York. The blanks
and further information may be ob-
tained from the Summer sesion office.

W. D. MAHON, WHO AS INTERNA-
tional president of the carmen's un-
ion, had the deciding word in de-
termining that Chicago's street car
employees should strike today when
the surface line owners demanded
that the workers take a big cut in
wages.
SPAULDING DIES
z'

iHeld Many Posts of Importance
Service of Federal

in

Government

f

WAS ASSISTANT SECRETARY
OF TREASURY TWO TERMSj
} (By Associated Press)
Washington, July 31. - Brig. Gen.
Oliver Lyman Spaulding, former as-
sistant secretary of the treasury, re-
gent of the University of Michigan,
and for many years prominent in pub-
lic affairs in Michigan, died yesterday
at his home here, aged 89 years.
General Spaulding, iho served
throughout the Civil war after en-
listment with the Twenty-third Miclil-
gan infantry, served as assistant sec-
retary of the treasury from 1890 to
1893 and again from 1887 to 1903 and
was a member of the Forty-seventh
congress from Michigan. He also
served as secretary of state of Michi-
gan and was president. of the first
Pan-American customs conference 'in
1913.
Funeral services will be held in the
home in Washington. Burial will be
in Arlington.
The University of Michigan flag was,
lowered to half mast here today fol-
lowing receipt of news of the death
of Brig. Gen. Spaulding by Secretary
Shirley Smith of the University..
General Spaulding was a resident
%of St. Johns, Mich. He was one of
the best known men in the state. He
was active in politics and in the
war between the states, and over a
period of many years' activity held
every Masonic office within the gift of
the fraternity in Michigan'. He was
made a brigadier general by Presi-
dent Wilson. He was a regent of the
University from 1858 to 1864.
General Spaulding's family com-
prises his widow, four sons and one
daughter. They are: John C. Spauld-
ing,. Detroit attorney, Frank M.
Spaulding, mayor of St. Johns; Col.
Oliver L. Spaulding, Jr., Maj. Thomas
M. Spaulding, of the United States
Army, and Miss Edna C. Spaulding, of
St. Johns.

progress, which has been marked by'
the accumulation of common human
possessions, is a fundamental idea. It
seems that today men are becoming
aware of this sort of advance as sep-t
arate from the organic evolution whicht
produced or perhaps includes it.
Science an Acquisitive Process
"I should like to have you think of,
science as something which is goingt
on-happening-being worked at-in'
the world today. Scientific work is an
acquisitive process. It is the spirit
and essence of what we call advance-C
ment. -1
"But its importance has been in-.
creasing gradually. Organized science
is a late result rather than an effective
agent in the slow and painful develop-
ment of human nature."
Its curnulative nature-the fact that
each scientific achievement form a per-
manent contribution to the field of
knowledge-was pointed out by Pro-
fessor Sleator as a characteristic to
distinguished science from certain oth-
er devices, such as social service,
which might satisfy the preliminary
definition.;
There are no sciences, said Profes-
sor Sleator, whose connection with
human aaffirs is remote, whose contri-
butions to modern progress are van-4
ishingly small- Taking astronomy as,
the best example of such a possibly
useless science, he pointed out that
though the stars are so remote as to
have no practical effect upon us, the
knowledge of the bodies has affect-
ed us profoundly.
"No Science Remote"
"Discoveries about the stars are
discoveries about the earth. For the
same atoms and molecules are found
in sun and stars and planets, and
under the conditions prevailing in
the stars these ultimate particles may
reveal secrets which terrestrial
means could never discover.
."Science has filled the world with
instruments and devices. It offers us
harmless opportunity for the employ-
ment and development of commenda-
ble , human characteristics. It en-
courages us to believe that our des-
tiny may be and ought to be in our
own hands."
MAJESTIC THEATER CLOSED
FOR REMAINDER OF SUMMER

"The Banner of St. George" by El-
gar, is to be given* at 8 o'clock Wed-
nesday evening in Hill auditorium, as
the last of the series of weekly facul-
ty concerts. The Summer Choral Un-
ion, under the direction of GeorgeOs-
car Bowen, will be heard with Mrs.
Leslie Lamborn, soprano, of Royal
Oak. Mrs. Emma Fischer-Cross, will
offer a group of piano numbers.
The program in full is as follows:
Sanctus and Benedictus..Tschaikovsky
Summer Choral Union ......
Ah non credeo mirarti (from La
Sonambula);. ...............Bellini
Mrs. Leslie G. Lamborn
Concert Paraphrase on Valse-
"Rose from the South,".
............. ... Strauss-Schuett
"On Wings of Song.-.... ...
............. Mendelssohn-Liszt
Polonaise, Op. 53............Chopin
Mrs, Emma Fischer-Cross
Ava Maria from "Cross of Fire"
....... ... Max Bruch
Mrs. Lamborn
"The Banner of St. George" ...'..Elgar
A Cantata ,o tChorus and Solo Voice
Mrs. .mborn, soprano
Accompaniments will be 1by Mrs
George B. Rhead and Miss Alberta E.
Waterbury.

(By Associated Press)
Cincinnati; Ohio, July 31.-Five spe-
cific proposals for the settlement of
the railroad strike are contained in
President Harding's plan which, will
be submitted to railroad executives in
New York and rail union heads in Chi-
cago tomorrow, it was asserted tonight
by an .official of the railroad shop craft
union,
The official, who refused to permit
the use of his name, stated that he had
secured the information from rail un-"
ion officials in Washington, Satur-
day
Five Point Given
The five specific proposals, accord-
ing to the official, includes:
1.-That the employes will abide by
the decisionstof the United States rail-
road labor board in the future.
2.-In the matter of seniority, the
employes who remained on the job
during the strike will receive prefer-
ential treatment. Men who have been
on strike will return with the senior-
ity rights subject to those rights ac-
quired during the strike by men who
remained on the job and that the sen-
iority of the new employes will date
from the time they entered the serv-
ice..
Contracting Barred
3.--The men will accept the recent
wage reductions of the railroad labor
board pending a further rehearing of
the matter by the board.
4.-Contracting out of shop work by
the railroads will be discontinued.
5.--Discussion of the establishment
of adjustment boards.
Regarding the matter of adjustment
boards, the official stated that the un-
ions desire i national board while the
rail executives seek other regional or
system boards.

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 31. - C
that the railroad strike wot
matter of -history within 2
after acceptance by railroad
and transportation chiefs 01
dent Harding's compromise :
'of the government's influen
mustered 'tonight behind the
to obtain adoption of the pla
employers' meeting in New Y
that of the employes in Chi
morrow.
Chairman' Hooper of .the
laborboard, after a confere:
President Harding today, left
cago to be on hand when the
is called of the general policy
tee of the striking shoperaft
Secretary Hoover left tonigh
tend the New York meetini
executives.
Seniority Is "Sticking Po
At the same time, the stick
in the whole attempt to neg
settlement, the "seniority rig
called, continued to protrude
conversation and public stat
the leaders concerned, with
"awkwardness" as ever, even
ering the President's sugges
its compromise.
Managements . of several
larger systems which now4
haverthe strike weakened
sisted that restoring the strik
though they accept their d
pay and abrogation of favora
would mean the dismissal
numbers of competent men
since the strike.
It would further mean
placement of men who stoc
railroads and who have since
promised promotions in the
All Men Must Be Cared
On the union side it was
such spokesmen for the org
as were still watching the
of events here that no s
would be made by the orga
unless it took care of all t
That meant that all railroad,
nierely the large number o
lines had to put the, agreen
effect, and' that all the sti
each road had to be taken
Though not officially mad
the President's compromis
tion as it applies to the cri
iority issue, would place fir
seniority list all shop enmpl
did not strike, would give a
ing strikers places just beh
and would give all the effic
hired by the roads since 1
d began such positions on th
their length of actual ser
y earned.
e Those familiar with railr
Q tice pointed out that the cl
a (Continued on Page F

Students To Visit River Rouge
Ford Plants Tomorrow Afternoon

The eleventh excursion of'the Sum- f
mer session will give students an op-I
portunity to view the Ford plants lo-
cated at River Rouge, south of DetroitI
and close to the interurban lines. In
modern equipment, and in capacity af
output, the the River Rouge works
have been called the Krupp works of1
America.]
On the arrival of the party at the1
general office, about 3 o'clock on the
afternioon of Wednesday, Aug. 2, a
guide will take charge of the group.
Automobiles will be provided to con-
vey the party to'-the plant from the in-
te'rurban "lines. First, the 125 coke
ovens, requiring a minimum of labor
-due to mechanical improvements, will
be inspected. The by-product build-
ing, where gas for the city of De-
troit, fertilizer, and tar products are
secured from coke ovens, will be seen.
-A $200,000 coal car converter, which
lifts filled coal cars bodily from the
tracks to a sthree-story height, in-
verts 'them into a coal chute, then
returns the empty car to the track,
will. next be observed in operation.
Following this the party will inspect
the locomotive repair shops, part of

the Ford railway system, then the two
huge blast furnaces, with capacity of
500 tons each, and from there the pig
iron shop will be shown the visitors.
Will See Tractor Plant
Of especial interest, considering the
wider use of the machines, should 'be
the trip through the Fordson tractor
plant, where several hundred finished
tractors are turned out daily. In the
same vicinity is located the Ford body
plant, supplying the Highland Park
factory with most of the regular and
-closed car bodies.
At River Rouge the largest foundry
in .the world, and undoubtedly the
most efficient, is in operation, and a
journey through this many acre area
plant, where the casting of motors
can be advantageously seen, will be
granted University students. The last
point to be visited will be the powe:
plant, housed in a building larger than
Hill auditorium. Among the unique
features here are the non-smoke furn-
aces, the practically ashless burning of
the specially pulverized coal, and the
engines, so powerful that considerabl(
electrically generated power is trans-
(Continued on Page Four)

Blanchard Here From Biology Camp
Frank N. Blanchard, of the botany
department: who has been at the bio-
logical station on Douglas lake during
the summer, is in the city. He will
return to the etation Wednesday.

Announcement was made yesterday
to the effect that the Majestc theater
would be closed for repairs for the
rest of the summer. Practically the
whole building will be made over and
redecorated. New floors- will be plac-
ed in the theater and new opera chairs
will take the place of the old ones.
The front lobby will also be enlarged
to accommodate the crowds..

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Complaints against
ery of The Daily may
.ed by calling 960. 1
not getting your pape
delivery is irregular r
us.
I.*

DELIVERY

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SHAKISPEARE PLAYHOUSE Presents in Open Air Campus Theatre, at POPULAR PRI(
Thursday Night, Aug. 3rd, 8 o'clock, Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew" Saturday Afternoon, Aug. 5th, 4 o'clock, Shakespeare's "Twelfth Ni
Friday blight, Aug. 4th, 8 o'clock, Galsworthy's "Pigeon" Saturday Night, at 8 o'clock, Barrie's "The Admirable Crichtor

Reserved Seats, 75 Cents.

General Admission, 5O Cents.

Reserved Seats for four performances, $2.25.
t, began 10 a. m. Monday, July 31st.

Wahr's Book

Pe. State str,

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