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June 19, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-19

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THE WEATHER
FAIR TODAY AND TO-
MORROW

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XIII. No. 3 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, MONDAY, JUNE 19, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS
HUGHES UPHOLDS OPENDIPLOMACY

SECRETARY FLAYS
SECRET POLICIES
IN WORLDAFFIIRS

COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER

DIXON 'HOLDS GRAD
OUTFIT SCORELESS

78TH ANNUAL* COMMENCEMENT MARKS
PASSING OF 1700 SENIORS ON INTO
GREAT BODY OF MICHIGAN ALUMNI

Game Develops Pitching Duel
Ninth Whien Campbell, '11,
Weakens

TillI

DENOUNCES
TEND TO

METHODS WHICH
CAUSE INTERNAL
UNREST

SAYS U. S. HAS NO PART
IN FOREIGN INTRIGUES
Speaker Makes Plea for Formation
of Sound, Rational Public
Judgment
That open diplomacy is the best
and most desirable means of insuring
national integrity and international
good will-that group differences with-
in the nation hinder America's inter-
ests in foreign affairs-that condem-
nation and "ostracism" should -be un-
sparingly meted out .to those who im-
peril our friendly relations with o#her
nations"-these were the points on
which Charles Evans Hughes, Secre-.
tary of State., placed special stress in
his Commencement address in Hill
auditorium this morning.
Declaring that it was his purpose
to present his observations on the
conduct of our foreign relations, not
to define particular policies, but con-
sider method and control," the Secre-
tary continued:
"Recent developments abroad have
marked the passing of the old diplo-
macy and the introduction of more
direct and flexible methods responsive
to democratic sentiment. Peace-lov-
ing democracies have not been willing
to rest content with traditions and
practices which failed to avert the
greait catastrophe of the world war.
Public criticism in some instances
overshot the mark and becoming
emotional enjoyed the luxury of a
bitter and indiscriminate condemna-
tion.
"The most skilled diplomats of Eu-
rope were charged with having be-
come 'enmeshed in formulae and the
jargon of 'diplomacy;' with having
ceased to be conscious of pregnant
realities.' More potent than the crit-
ics were the exigencies due to the war
which required the constant contact
and direct interchanges of responsible
leaders. The aftermath of problems
has made necessary the frequent use
of similar methods permitting con-
cert, flexibility, more frequent informal
intercourse, and decisions which; if.
not. immediate, are relatively speedy.
The international conference attests
the new effort to achieve the neces-
sary adaptation to new demands..
No Foreign Dealings for U. S.

CHARLES EVANS HUGHES, SECRE TARY OF STATE, WHO DELIVERED
THE SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNU AL COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS
HERE THIS MORNING.

REAJUSTMENT IS
KEY TO SUCCESS
IN LIFE-BURTO6N
PRESIDENT URGES SENIORS IN
BACCALAUREATE TO HEED
TRANSITION
SAYS BALANCE, POISE
GIVE POWER TO YOUTH
Evolution, Not Revolution, Method of
Civilization, Speaker
Declares
Impressive dignity and solemnity
marked the Baccalaureate ceremon-s

"It would be a shallow critic who
would associate the United States
with either the aims, the methods or
the mistakes of the traditional diplo-
macy of Europe. To her 'primary in-
terests,' as Washington said, we had
at best 'a very remote relation.' We
have had no part in the intrigues to
maintain balance of power in Europe
and no traditions of diplomatic caste.
From the outset-from the first efforts
of Benjamin Franklin-American di-
plomacy has deemed itself account-
able to public opinion and has enjoyedl
the reputation of being candid and'
direct. . . . . .
"The difficulty of maintaining a true!
perspective and distinctively American
opinion in the field of foreign affairs
is greatly increased by the natural and
persistent efforts of numerous groups
to bend American policy to the inter-
est of particular peoples to whom they
are attached by ties of kinship and
sentiment. The conflicts of opinion'
and interest in the old world are repro-
duced on our own soil.. . . . . .
"Whatever the advantage of our
governmental arrangements-and I
should be the last to under-estimate
them-I thing it shoes , be candidly
admitted that they have'4he effect of
limiting the opportunities for the re-
sponsible discussion which aids in thr
understanding of foreign policy. The
conduct of foreign relations pertains

ies held, yesterday morning in Hill
auditorium,. before an audience of
seniors, parents and friends which
overflowed to the aisles and corridors
of the building.
The program was. opened with
"Piece Heroique," an organ number
rendered by Prof. Earl V. Moore, fol-
lowed by the invocation by Rev. Sid-
ney S. Robbins. Robert Dieterle, S. of
M., sang "Adore and Be Still," with
an organ accompaniment by Prof.
Moore.
At the close of the solo President
Marion L. Burton arose to deliver the
Baccalaureate address of the seventy-
seventh Commencement. His opening
words were an expression of appre-
ciation of Commencement days, lend-
ing a note of placidity and confidence
to the occasion.
President Burton began:
"Something gives a beautiful, fas-
cinating quality to commencement
days. Possibly this quality is the cum-
ulative effect of various causes. Per-
haps these days take on a character
all of their own because they mark
the realization of high hopes; or be-
cause they are full and justly so, of
the pride of achievement; or because
they furnish substantial evidence of.
the claim that these hundreds of grad-
uates are the responsible possessors
(Continued on Page Three).

DEGREES OF HIGH
DISTINCTIO0N GIVEIN
TO ELEVEN TODAY
HUGHES, FROST, CHAPIN, AND
GROESBECK AMONG THOSE
HONORED
RECIPIENTS ARE WORLD
FAMOUS IN ALL FIELDS
Economists, Engineers, Physicians,
Men-of-Letters, and Statesmen
Included
Eleven honorary degrees were con-
ferred upon men of national and in-
ternational fame, at the Seventy-
Eighth annual Commencement exer-
cises this morning in Hill auditor-
ium.
The recipients of the degrees are:
Mortimer Grant Barnes, M. Eng.
Mr. Barnes is chief engineer of the
division of Waterways for the state
of Illinois. He has been associated
with important feats of engineering,
including the building of the New
York barge canal.
Albert May Todd, M. A. As a native
of Michigan Mr. Todd has been known
as a public benefactor and a close
student of economic problems.
James Alexander Veasey, LL.M.,
general counsel of the Carter Oil com-
pany, and a graduate of the Univer-
sity. The recipient is well-known for
his articles on the legal phases .at-
tached to the oil industry.
Dr. Clarence Jones Grieves, M.A.
Dr. Grieves is chief of the dental staff
of Johns Hopkins university, and was
prominent in his field as a national
servant during the World War.
Roy Dikeman Chapin, M.A., presi-
dent of the Hudson Motor company.
As chairman of the Highway transport
commission during the war, Mr.
Chapin showed the practicability of
the use of motor transport facilities.
Robert Frost, M.A., poet and teach-
,er; trained at Dartmouth and Har-
vard; yet more truly a fashioner of

VARSITY WINS FINAL GAME
OF SERIES BY SCORE OF 8-0
Masterful pitching, by Dixon gave
the Michigan Varsity a victory over
the alumni team Saturday afternoon,
he allowing only two hits and Uo runs
while his teammates scored eight
runs.0
Campbell, the alumni pitcher,
kept the younger team. under control
until the ninth when he weakened and
the Varsity batted all around, scoring
six runs. Uteritz scored the first run.
He was walked and then stole second.
Wimbles fouled out to the catcher and
Knode was walked. Rodgers the al-
umni catcher, tried to catch Knode off
first and Uteritz went to third. Knode
started to steal second and on the
throw to that bag Uteritz came home.i
In the fourth Roby tripled to left
field and came home on Paper's hit to
right center. Roby started the damage
in the ninth by hitting over second
base. Paper bunted and CampbellI
threw over the first baseman's head,
Roby going to second. Blott bunted
and because of a mixup no one cov-
ered the first sack and he was safe.
Dixon making his second hit to Perrin
in center field scored both men and
went to second himself. Blott came
home on an error by the alumni catch-
er. Wimbles bounced one off 'the
pitchers glove but was thrown out atf
first, however, Dixon scored. Knode
singled to left of first and scored
on Shackleford's triple and "Shack"
scored on Kipke's hit. Roby up for
the second time this inning was
thrown out at first.
Mitchell, '12, and Newell, '20, were
the two to make hits off Dixon. Thist
was the last game for him on the Var-8
sity ,as well as for Wimbles, and Roby
who has played baseball for threet
years. Schultz, who has pitched re-N
liable ball whenever he was sent in
will not be back next year nor will
"Ernie" Vick who is at present withI
the St. Louis Cardinals.
Olivet Gets $75,000 Gift
Charlotte, June 16.-Gifts to Olivet
college amounting to $75,000 were an-
nounced at the sixty-second annual
commencement.
his own education through sympa-t
thetic and penetrating studies of manP
and nature. As a Fellow in Creative
Arts, Mr. Frost has been a welcome
sojourner in our academic community
-wise, gracious, and stimulating. S
Sir Thomas Lewis, Sc.D., physicianr
of the University hospital, London,c
England, and physician of the staff ofr
the Royal Medical research commit-I
tee. Sir Thomas has opened new1
fields in the study of the mechanisme
of the heart, and during the war wasI
in charge of all work relating tox
heart diseases in the British army.
Dr. Charles Hall Grandgent, L.H.D.,i
is the author of numerous works in1
field of grammar, linguistics, phonet-
ics, and critical literature. Some-I
time president of the Modern Lang-c
gage association, and for 36 years aI
teacher in Harvard, his alma mater.
Dr. Erwin Frink Smith, LL.D., is a
graduate of Michigan, and since 18861
has been pathologist in charge of the
laboratory of pathology, bureau of1
plant industry in the United States
Department of Agricalture
Governor Alexander Joseph Groes-
beck, LL.D. Governor -Groesbeck is aI
graduate of the Law school and afteri
serving two terms as Attorney Gen-r
eral, was elected governor in 1920.c
Charles Evans Hughes, LL.D., sec-
retary of state, jurist and statesman,f
is a graduate of Brown universityj
and Columbia Law school. Beginning8
his public activities in his native statei

of New York, he became the governor,
then Associate Justice of the Supremea
Court of the United States.

DAILY SUSPENDS PUBLICATION
With this issue, The Summer
Michigan Daily suspends public-
ation until Saturday, June 24.
On that date, regular publica-
tion will commence, continuing
throughout the Summer, session
to August 13.
C upid Discloses
Secret Vows At
SeniorBreakfast
Announcements of engagements and
coming marriages were made at the
Senior Girls' breakfast held yester-
day morning at the Union. This is a
traditional affair over .which much
speculation is aroused because of the
fact that the results of Cupid's work
during the past four years are made
,known at this timex
The breakfast opened with a talk by
Dean Myra B. Jordan who spoke on
"Traditions." Ephemia Carnahan and
Amy Loomis also talked to the girls.
After the speeches, class songs were
sung and a dish of lemons and lighted
candles were passed to all the girls.
Those who took the lemon signified
by so doing that they wished to an-
nounce their engagement. They were
Margaret Gillies, Thelma Packham,
Emilie Arnold, Irma Schnauffer, Mar-
4an Nichols, Dorothy Trevor, Isabel
Kemp, Dora. Ritchie, Evelyn Rockwell,
,Margaret Binder, Rooma Hooper, Car-
rie Van Horn, Margaret Tibbals,'Zella
,Carr, Juanita Waits, Leona Wright,
Corrine Merkel, Katherine Andrews,
and Esther Lyons.
The girls who blew out the candle
to show that they will be married
within the year are: Margaret Spauld-
pg, Hazel Storz, Ada Nutten, Evan-
geline Parke, Helen Shaw, Florence
Freeman, Florence Thieme, Elizabeth
Howard, Isabel Farnum, and Sayde
Strauss.
Wesbrook Enters
Tennis Tourney
It has been definitely announced
that Walter Wesbrook will represent
Michigan at the Eastern Intercolleg-
iate tennis tournament to be held June
g5 and 26 in Philadelphia. No one
will go with him to compete in the
dloubles and he will be Michigan's sole
representative in the singles. Because
of the fact.that there is no three year
rule in the East he is eligible to com-
Pete in these matches while he has
been barred from play on the'Varsity
all year because he finished last year
his three years allowed by Conference
rulings.
Wesbrook has a fine chance of win-
ning the title. At Chicago recently
he surprised everyone and copped the
Sherwood tournament by defeating
Walter Hayes, national clay court
champion. A year ago he was the
highest ranking college player. He
has been coaching the team this year
and has kept in fine shape by constant
practice.
U. OF D. TO GRANT DEGREES
TO CLASSES OF ABOUT 200
Rev. Michael P. Bourke, of Ann
Arbor, delivered the baccalaureate ad-
dress at the thirty-eighth annual com-
mencement exercises of the Uiversity
of Detroit yesterday.
The exercises will last four days,
ending Wednesday, June 21, when de-
grees will be awarded to a class of

almost 200. Rev. Bourke is the only
'recipient of an honorary degree this
year, the honor being conferred as a
reward for his "efforts in the interests
of bjgher education."

BUGLE AT 8:15) THIS MORNING
CALLS CLASS OF 1922 TO
FINAL FORMATION
GRADUATING GROUP IS
LARGEST IN HISTORY

Every Seat in Hill Auditorium,
Taken and Crowd Gathers but-
doors as Program Starts

is

Commencement-that last step which
the senior must mount before taking
his place in the world-the final link
.which binds him to the great body of
Michigan alumni-marked the gradu-
ation this morning of approximately
1700 seniors, members of the class of
1922, the largest number that has ever
received degrees from the University.
Parade Across Campus
Following the annual ceremony of
the bugle-call and flag-raising at 8:15
o'clock which started the finalactivi-
ties of the day, the classes formed at-
their respective posts behind their
class officers. It took but a short
time for the seemingly disorderly
mass to form into' an orderly, self-
regulating parade. Slowly, solemnly,
the procession wended its way across
the campus to Hill auditorium, there
to partake in the exercises which
would complete the closing events of
undergraduate life for the members
of the graduating body.
The seniors entered Hill auditorium'
aabout 9:30 o'clock, and a few min-
utes more elapsed before the great as-
,sembly hall was filled to its capacity
with members of the faculty, parents,
relatives and friends. The auditorium
was hushed during the preliminary ex-
ercises,-all was anticipation leading
up to the three biggest events-the ad-
,dress of Charles Evans Hughes, Sec-
retary of State, the granting of hon-
orary degrees to men of prominence
and merit, and the awarding of the
degrees to the seniors:
Hughes Gives Address
Secretary Hughes, the chief Com-
mencement speaker, is known through-
out the world today as a result of the
outstanding part lie took as a leader
in the Disarmament Conference at
Washington. His life ha been one of
public activity, having been governor
of the state of New York at one tine
and for six years a member of the Su-
preme Court of the United States.
The ope stands facing the entrance
to Hill auditorium, which had been
erected in order to take cae of the
great number of alumni and visitors
who could not be accommodated with-
in the auditorium, because of lack
of seating space, were filled early,
forming a review stand for the proces-
sion. Radio amplifiers carried the
speech of. Secretary Hughes to the
stands.
Of the different departments repre-
sented, the Literary college hd the
gratest number of seniors receiving
degrees, their number totaling 659.
Engagement Announced by Students
Announcement has been made of
the engagement of Myrtle Rowena
Reed, '21, to Samuel D. Porter, '21E.
ALUMNI PLEASED WITH GAMES
Norman Hill, '11, captain of
the Alumni baseball team, ex-
pressed his appreciation for the
sportsmanship of the Varsity
nine and hope that an Alumni-
Varsity game would be made an
annual event in a statement after
Saturday's game.
"Nothing, he declared, "could
be of greater influence to arouse
interest of the Alumni and serve
to draw them back again to Ann
Arbor for Commencement
Week."
I .a

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