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September 19, 1957 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CHARGE TWSPAPER BIAS:
Survey Research Finds Reader Views

quality

;anford

ships designed to
human resources for
esearch and training in
ioral science fields were
warded to thre Univer-
.y members.
V. Tyler, director of the
Advanced Study in the
. Sciences, Stanford,
, presented the fellow-
>rof. Ronald Lippitt of
ogy department, Prof.
Stevenson of the phil-
partment and Prof. Guy
in of the sociology de-"
rd Foundation provides:
the Center. It was es-
in 1954 and is a non-
poration.
imary influence of the
of each fellow at the
.1 be reflected in his fu-
rch and training of oth-
hers as he resumes shis
tfvities in his home in-

The America press is consid-
ered politically~iased by about
one fourth of b nation's news-
paper readers, ccording to the
University's Suey R e s e a r c h
Center.
About two thisof the readers
disagree.
These were sie of the find-
ings of a studyy the SRC. An
analysis of the mnter's 1956 na-
tional electionsaudy was made
by Associate Pressors Dean Ba-
ker and CharleCannell, of the
school of jourtism, and pre-
sented at the aual meeting of
the Association r Education in
Journalism, at ston University
on August 29.
DemocralLoudest
Criticism was aviest from the
Democratic side.W per cent of
which felt thathe newspapers
favored Presiden)wight D. Eis-
enhower in the 56 presidential
election. Only 'er cent of the
Republicans agr with this.
There was mo agreement as
to favoritism tord Adlai Ste-
venson. Two pc cent of the
Democrats and 4er cent of the
Republicans claiid that news
was slanted in hilirection. >
As the amount education in-
creased, so did tlaccusations of
bias. Nearly one td of the col-
lege-educated saithe news fa-

vored President Eisenhower, com-
pared to only 19 per cent of those
who had only a grade school edu-
cation.
Baker and Cannell found that,
although many felt that newspa-
pers were biased, only about half
of them could give examples.
Instances Cited
Those who did cite instances
of bias mentioned unfairness in
the amount and placement of
news about candidates. Others
mentioned the selection of items
to be reported and the manipu-
lating of headlines and pictures.
Those interviewed in Ann Ar-
bor were also asked how they
thought, general newspaper policy
was made. Well over half felt that
the editor or editorial staff was
responsible. Eighteen per cent
thought it was the job of the
owner or board of directors, andl

5 per cent said it was done by the
manager or publisher.
Nearly half the subjects, how-
ever, thought that the choice of
a political candidate was made
by the owner or board of direc-
tors. Only one fourth credited this
to the editor or editorial staff.
Television Up
In another part of the survey,
the SRC found that television has
become the number one source of
campaign information, although
among those with a college edu-
cation, newspapers ran a close
second. In that same group, mag-
azines moved into the 'third spot.
Radio held a significant place
only among those with only a
grade school education.
The Ann Arbor study, con-
ducted by students in the Depart-
ments of Journalism and Psychol-
ogy, covered only 223 interviews.

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CONSTRUCTION SLOWED - A minor cave-in halted work for
one day in Mary Markley Hall, to be completed next September.
NEW POSITION:
Gesko Named City Assistant

...515 EAST WILLIAM

NO 8-6335
NO 8-7017

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7

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Job

F. Drummond,
history depart-
ppointed chair-
1 studies depart-
tate University
in Geneseo, New
summer he has
>rofessor at the
w Mexipo in Al-

University graduate ,.student
Samuel C. Gesko, Jr. was recent-
ly appointed administrative as-
sistant to City Administrator Guy
C. Larcom, Jr.
A revision in the city budget
made possible the newly created
position. The job is in the nature
of a training position for city,
managpr work.
His duties will include prepar-
ing costs of annexiig certain
areas and extending city services.
Another of Gesko's duties will be
to begin preparation of the city's
annual report.
Gesko will work directly under
Larcom at a starting annual sal-
ary of $4,549.
City officials feel that the po-'

sition will expedite Larcom's
work. Gesko will meet with City
department heads and developers
to discuss possible annexations.

OPEN 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.
MONDAY 9:00 A.M.-8:30 P.M.

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