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September 19, 1957 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Students Win Awards

paid off .for 10
s who received
opwood awards

in the
say and
3ader of

T6p winners in the fiction cate-
gory were Marilyn Yolles, Grad.;,
and Burley Hendricks, '59E. Miss
Yolles' winning manuscript was
entitled "Three Stpries," while
Hendricks' was "Two Stories."
Other fiction winners were Helen
Major, '58, who entered "Three
to. Michigan and

ie Store of Quality
REASONABLE Prices.

Wear

Sream
cks .. .8.95 up :
p Hats. .850 up
ly Shirts.3.95 up.
Sox '.... 55c up
Brummel
s . .. . .. 1.50 up "
Bud German Jackets .
Pioneer Belts..........
Ivy Polished Cotton Slacks

Winter Stories," Bradley R. Niel-
sen, Grad., who wrote "Three
Stories," and Daniel P. Kimble,
Grad., who entered. "Three Stor-
ies."
In the essay category top award
was given to Mary o. Bank., Grad.,
for "A Portrait of an Artist," a
collection of essays.
Two other awards in this cate-
gory were given to W. J. Dressier,
Spec., for "The Business Man in
the American Novel," and Grace
Larson, Grad., for "Two Essays."
Patricia Theisen, Spec., received
the only poetry award. Her entry
was "Demons Dance."
Only drama award was pre-
sented to Annie Coleman, '58, for
"Second Best," a one-act play.
Top awards for fiction and'
poetry were $75. Poetry and drama
winners received $50. The other
awards were $35.
Judges for the contest were Pro-
fessors Karl Litzenburg, Norma
Nelson, John Weimer and Robert
Haugh, all members of the English
department.
The Hopwood Contest, which is
held annually, was established
from the endowment fund of
Avery Hopwood, '05. The contest
is open to' qualified students in
any school or college inuthe Uni-
versity.
Marra Elected
To Chairmanship
Allan A. Marra, associate pro-
fessor in the School of Natural
Resources, was chosen vice-chair-
man of the adhesion group of the
Gordon Conference in 1958 and
chairman in 1959.

Hay Named
Mathematicsf
Acting Heady
George H. Hay, professor of
mathematics, has been appointed
acting chairman of the depart-
ment of mathematics in the lit-
erary college.
The appointment, announced
by Vice President and " Dean of
Faculties Marvin L. Niehuss, be-
came effective August 16, follow-
ing the retirement furlough of
Prof. Theophil Hildebrandt. Hil-
.debrandt has served as chairman
for the last 23 years.
A native of Durham, Ontario;
Hay received his bachelor of arts,
master of arts and doctor of phil-
osophy degrees from the Univer-
sity of Toronto. ,
He began as an instructor at
the University in 1940 after teach-
ing at the Illinois Institute of
Technology for i year. Teaching
in the college of engineering, he
was promoted to assistant profes-
sor in 1942, associate professor, in
1947, and became a full professor
in 1956.
His main scholastic interests
are applied mathematics, the
mathematical theory of elasticity,
and mechanics.
TU' Publi~shes
Trotsky5 l, .oo]
An account of the Russian Revo-
lution, written by Leon Trotsky,
has been published by University
Press.
Entitled "The History of the
Russian Revolution," *the book was
first published in English in 1932,
and has long been out of print.
It is an important first person
account of the Bolshevik coup and
as such this translation by Max
Eastman represents an important
contribution to the information
available on the subject.

r

To Faculty
In Educati
Prof. John L. Childs and
Edgar B. Wesley have bee
pointed visiting professors
University's education -schc
The appointments, for the
ing academic year, were
nounced by Vice-President
Dean of Faculties Marvin L
huss.
Prof. Childs is professor e
tus of the philosophy of edu
at Teachers College of Col
University, where he taugi
17 years. He will teach clan
this subject at the Universi
He holds a bachelor of ar
gree from the University of
consin, and master of art
doctor of philosophy degrees
from Columbia.
Childs has a number of
to his credit. His most rec(
"American Pragmatism and
cation,",. named by the Na
Education Association Jour:
1957 as one of the outsta
educational books of the ye
Prof. Wesley was formerly
fessor of education and hist
the University of Minnesot
courses here will be in hist
education.
He matriculated from Bal
Wallace College, in Berea, C
received his M.A. and P~hX
greed from Washington Ui
sity. He was also awarded a
tor of Letters degree .by
College, Barbourville, Ky,
He is the author of: "NEA
First Hundred Years," the
cial history of the associati
SRC To Stu(
Wokm'

T V L. i

16.50
1.50
4.95

up.
up
up

Jockey Underwear . .... 1.25 up
B.V.D. Underwear . ..... 89c up
Middishade Suits ....... $65 up
Alligator Rain Coats and.
Topcoats, Middishade
Sportcoats. . . . . $35 up

t
1.

PARKING PROBLEM-With the increase of bikes on campus, police have'taken steps to enforce
parking regulations. Tickets and impoundment are enforced when bikes are found illegally parked.
The University has spent thousands of dollars installing racks, like these behind Couzens Hall, in
various parts of the campus.
Bikes Cause Confusion on Campus

TEPS AND SAVE
nday evenings til

DOLLARS
9

/via
s;
a"

The University is faced with
another traffic problem-bicycles..
Students, estimated at close toj
16,000, will be pedaling their two-
(vheeled conveyances complete
with side baskets and hand brakes
down the already-crowded .Ann,
Arbor streets this fall.
Many harried drivers and pe-
destrians can testify to the num-
ber of bicycles that jam the"
streets and sidewalks during the
rush hours.
City's Steps
The City has taken -steps to

f I

Store Hours
Daily 9 to 5:30

i rY

combat the parking problem that
accompanies the thousands of
bikes. Parking regulations have
been enforced by police to cope
with the problem but they con-
tinue to jam the sidewalks and
fronts of buildings,
Special steps have been taken
to reduce the jumble of bikes in
front of stores on State Street.
Signs forbidding the parking of
bikes on the sidewalks were in-
stalled last year.
Parking violations were issued
to students not complying with
the regulations. Bicycles were re-
moved ahd impounded until the
owner produced the necessary
fine.
Licenses are issued at a cost of
fifty cents. Failure to displayone
results in a fine for the owner.

Students are . able to purchase
theirs at the Student Activities
Building.
Increase Felt
The University has especially
felt the increase in the number of
bicycles. Thousands of dollars
have been spent installing special
bicycle racks in'the front of cam-
pus buildings.-
Signs forbidding the parking of
bicycles at the side entrance of
the Unionr were put up this sum-
mer. Union directors had received
complaints from persons entering
the building.'
Several people were injured
stumbling over the jumble of
bikes that jammed the doorway.
At one count 62 bicycles cluttered
the entrance.

Compei

-0

Ffiir. iiIiIl

DESERT, BOOTS
DESERT SADDLES.

BY
OF ENGLAND

Rapidly hecoming the most
popular shoes on the Campus

DESERT BOOTS driginated on the South'
African veldt. Very soft, light-weight brushed
leather with pure plantation crepe rubber soles.
$12.95

WELCO-ME
To our old friends and
to the new students .+.
We hope that we wil be
able to serve you again
this year.
UNIVERSITY DRUG COMPANY
1225 South University

You have tried the Rest -- Now try the Best
PIZZA

Super
Cheese
Cheese
Cheese

Small'
... . . .........1.30
and Pepperoni ........10
and Mushroom ......1.10
and Anchovy .........1.10

ESERT SADDLES and DESERT KAHNS
illustrated at the right are low versions of
e boot. The former are made of sand color

shed leather, and the
wn polished calf.

latter are antiqued
$13.95 and $1495

Cheese .... .................90
Plain Pepperoni ......90
Plain Mushroom ........... .90
Plain Anchovy......... .90
Pepperoni and Mushroom ....1.15
Cheese and Ham........ ..1.15
Cheese and Hamburger ......1.15
Cheese and Bacon.......1.15

Medium
1.90
1.50
1.50J
1.50
1.15
1.35+
1.35
1.35
1.55
1.60
1.60
1.60

Large,
2.50
1.85
1.85
1.85
1.40
1.80
1.80
1.80
2.20
2.00
2.00'
.00

The University's Survey
search Center will attempt to
cover what happens to a. wo
after he has received. ompen
tion for an injury.
The study is being financed
the Federal' Office of Vocatio
Rehabilitation, and is being c
ducted in cooperation .with 1
the State Department of Wo
men's Compensation and
State Office of Vocational
habilitation.
It is being undertaken with
eye toward possible liberaliza
of Michigan's Workmen's C
pensation laws.
Lawmakers and administra
are especially interested in
outcome of the study. At pres
nothing is known about .the
of workers who have rece
compensation. The state, th
fore; has no way of knowing
efficacy of the present laws.
The survey, it is hoped,
provide the necessary infor
tion, and also a better an
standing of the feelings of
injured toward the compensa
laws.
The SRC plans to take ran
sample interviews with more tl
400 Michigan workers injure
the job ayear or more ago.'T
intend to cover 46 counties in
state, including workers who,
injured in'these counties but h
since moved to another place
The study will be directed
James Morgan, Marion Gross
Marvin Snider of the SRC.
sults are expected no later t
March, 1958.
WANTED!
1000 HEADS
be they square, flat or rounde
for that crew-cut
at
The aseola Barber
NeMichi Daednn Theatre

TATE STREET AT LIBERTY

The Prices Do Not Include Sales Tax

IL _- r f
S:Iiny a}".ir 7t """" rr"'.ti, 'C+' r .1f"" "'i":Q71':;{>rr; }{ r.r r;.' . " +y'a ?"rti;o ar r v ... , _ r.."iv~5 r,"Y r, r "} r oR"",K {"^ ! "
1 .": d".. riC v 'ram.rG.rSav.. a.n"",R"b r..Sr. ..;tir,...s...:.m .."cca:.... rLaR.r.". d S"rr aSra . rw:"..
":sGv.'r:imti r ars :xti":a:":"v..,}:'"n .4+' . r r"

Phone NOrmandy 2-9442

Fast Carry-Out Service

classroom clothes get their good looks at Greene's ... classroom clothes get

. ''
r:
<
tf'
ยข; ftt"
Y;
.!.

Delivery Service ... 1 Pizza 75c -2 or more 40c'

FOWLER'S PIZZA KITCHEN
ITALIAN PIZZA
"It's a meal in itself"

E;'. 5
' 7 't

I

Wti
.A '. L

W. Liberty and Stadium Blvd.

Campus Clothes

e 1

Ann Arbor, Mich.

get their good looks

LOWEST PRICES

at Greene's!

OFFICEIVS SHOES

'A

U.S. Army-Navy Type

.. .get, and keep, their smart good looks! Greene's
exclusive "Microcleaning" process can be compared to
no other. It's gentle, yet thorough. Leaves clothes more
than just clean-leaves them pressed to fit and they
can be re-pressed and re-worn many times before they.
need cleaning again. Greene's service includes waterproof-
ing, one-hour shirt laundry and rough-dry laundry-and
a new Self-Serve counter at the South U. store. Classroom
clothes can look as good as your dating duds-just make
Greene's a regular stop on your way to class!

OXskFORDS
* ARMY - BROWN
" NAVY - BLACK

$7f2S

I'J

k

t

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