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January 15, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wl

-Daily-Eric Arnold
nlce Bruckner as Adelaide, after having been
terson, played by John Kokales, receives a
ong, "Sue Me." "Guys and 'Dolls" will be
nn Arbor Civic Theatre at 8 p.m. t'otnorrow,
Ly at, the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
or Civie Theater
nt 'Guys and Dolls'

leatre
" the
mu-

o:uts

The Damon Runyon story has
been rewritten by Jo Swerling and
Abe Burrows and is a "fable of
Broadway." Ted Heusel is direct-
ing the play, winner of a New
York Drama Critics' Award.
Sky Masterson, played by John
Kokales, and Nathan Detroit, por-
trayed by Ken Macdonald, are
Broadway characters who enjoy
gambling, while Janice Bruckner,
as Adelaide tries to convince Na-.
than that marriage is better than
dice.
Anita Hovie, Grad., as Sarah
Brown is a Salvation Army work-
er who attracts Sky's eye. Miss
Hovie is' a vocal music major at
the University. MacDonald played
a-leading role in the Civic Theatre
production of "Country Girl" in
1955. Miss Bruckner "designed the
sets for this week's play.
Other 'leading roles will be
played by Alger Crandall, George
Finkel, '58 Doug Kerr, and Bob
Stasiuk. The cast of 35 includes
18 University students. Musicand
lyrics for the show are by Frank
Loesser.

'U' Courses
In Science
Attract Few'
Physics 20 and Chemistry 9, one
semester literary college courses
designed for non-science concen-
trates are not well enough known
and thus not in demand, two fac-
ulty members revealed recently.
According to Prof. Noah Sher-
man of the physics department,
who teaches Physics 20, the course
is limited to juniors and seniors
because rather than presenting "a
thin survey" it covers "a few ma-
jor accomplishments" in physics
without fully giving the informa-
tion correlating them. Mature stu-
dents, Prof. Sherman said, are
urged to consider the course,
which was new for the fall se-
mester.,.
Prof. Sherman stressed the
point that Physics 20 is not an
easy course, but can provide "a
sound background for a reason-
able evaluation of the scientific
and pseudo-scientific information
which is so important in modern
living."
Enrollment Trouble
"Chemistry 9," Prof. Leigh C.
Anderson, chairman of the Chem-
istry department said, "is com-
parable in intent to Physics 20
and has similar enrollment
trouble.
"There is a very small enroll-
ment - much smaller than in
Physics 20,"Prof. Anderson ex-
plained, "and I have learned that
many are scared off by the lab."
The geology department has no
comparable problem, according to
Prof. J. Wilson, department chair-
man. All geology courses which
provide "surveys" have no labora-
tory, he explained.
'Geology Scares Few
'Ardinarily," Prof. Wilson said,
"students are not frightened by
geology to the degree that they
are of chemistry or physics." a
Prof. William hiler of the as--
tronomy department said he saw
no hesitancy on the part of stu-
dents to take Astronomy 30, a one
semester survey which he teaches.
Present literary college distri-
bution requirements call for a two
semester sequence in a laboratory
science, plus an additional semes-
ter of' science. The third semester
-need not be in a laboratory sci-
ence. Physics 20 and Chemistry 9
offer no second semester contin-
uation.
Winter Camp
To Consider
Mans' ,atre
"Images of Man on the Univer-
sity Campus" will be the theme of
the Winter Rendezvous to be held
Jan. 28-31 at Wesley Woods. Camp
on Clear Lake, near Battle Creek,
Mich.
The conference will be spon-
sored by the Office of Religious
Affairs.
Rendezvous participants will
consider and discuss their. own
conceptions of the nature of man.
They will try to view Man as a
secular being, a religious being
and as he appears in the pages of
modern literature.
Heading the list of discussion
leaders will be Prof. Kenneth
Boulding of the economics depart-
ment. Also, members of the Office
of Religious Affairs will be pres-
ent to lead discussions and serve
as resource persons.
Commenting on the goals of the
retreat, program director Hal
Deurksen said, "I hope that stu-

dents who have felt extremely
crowded','by academic pressures
and activities will welcome Winter
Rendezvous as a chance to re-
consider their values and take a
new look at themselves in the un-
hurried atmosphere which we are
trying to provide."
Application blanks are avail-
able at the Office of Student Af-
fairs in xLane Hall.

Formosan Law Professor
Visits University on Tour

By THOMAS TURNER
A former member of the Chi-
nese delegation to the Interna-
tional Military Tribunal in Tokyo
following 'World War II, Prof.
John Yu Kwei of the National
Taiwan University law school,
Formosa, is visiting the University
law school today.
"All systems of law are basically
the same," the Chinese jurist said,
speaking of observations mnade on
his trip to this gountry. Prof. Kwei
will be in Ann Arbor until tomor-
row.
Prof. Kwei has had a long ca-
reer in legal and political matters
in his country. During the second
world war he was secretary to the
Supreme National Defense Coun-
cil, highest wartime policy-
making body. At one time he
served as Judge of the Special
High Court of the International
Settlement of Shanghai.
Meets Friends I
Many of Prof. Kwei's friends
and professors had graduated
from the University law school,
he explains, so he felt he had to,
come here. Prof. Kwei's itinerary
was arranged for him by the
United States State Department.
Arriving in this country Decem-
ber 18, the Chinese judge has'beer
to Honolulu, Washington, D.C.,
and Boston, visiting state and lo-'
'cal courts. He has been to the law
schools of Harvard, Princeton and
Yale Universities, "conferring," as
he says, "with his colleaguies."
"The purpose. of my visit," the
law professor explains, "is to meet
people in the legal and education-
al fields."
Sees Minor Differences
In his trip, Prof. Kwei has ob-
served, he says, only minor differ-
ences in law.
Most people, the Chinese jurist
explains, 'think that because Chi-
na uses the continental system of
trial by judge instead of by jury,
the legal system is different.
The foundation of any legal sys-
tem, Prof. Kwei says, is the as-

State Health
Conference
The relationship of -atomic en-
ergy to health will be the key topic
of the 11th Annual Michigan Rur-
al Health Conference to be held
Jan. 22-23 at the Michigan Union.
The conference will feature 56
speakers and health experts.
Though the "Atom and Health"
problem will receive greater stress,
several other topics concerning
rural health will be covered.
On Wed., Jan. 22, Captain
James Brimson, M.D., a govern-
ment authority on atomic energy,
will speak on the "Peacetime Ap-
plications of Atomic Energy."
Different phases of the atomic
energy and health problem will be
covered by talks on such topics as
radiation and food and the effects
of radiation on the body.
The topics for the first day have
been selected with an eye toward
those interested in rural health'.
The second day has been divided
into the Professional Day and
Community Health Day pro-
grams.
Nave a WOR1 Uof FUN!
o o Tvef with ilTA
unbelievable ,Low Cost
60 Days from $585
43-65 Days $998
r Qp st s ourisnua p
SELE tEY
Arlsotow-cost trips to Mexic
i $1 49 vp, South Americo $699 up,
Hawaii Study Tour $498 up and
Around the world $1398 up.
___ Ask Your Travel Aaant'
2111 IV
YOUr WORLD TRAVEL, INC.
or Campus representative:'
- MISS' HELEN SARBEY
Fletcher Hall
University of Michigan

(AROL REED brings you The Unexpected
CEUIA JOHNSON " DIANiA DORS " JONATHAN ASHMORE "-DAVID
Eastman COLOR-
... Premieres THURSDAY.
Your
"DOCTOR af
doctor twas tunny
will tell " ,'DOCTOR of
y/ou ... was funnier
"DOCT
is the funn

rr

-Daily James MacKay
PROF. JOHN YU KWEI
. from the National Taiwan
University Law School, Formosa
sumption that a person is inno-
cent until proven guilty.
Explains Misunderstandings
"Another objective of my trip,
then, is to explain things people'
may have, misunderstood."
Prof. Kwei expressed interest
both in meeting Free Chinese stu-
dents here at the University and
in visiting the Phoenix project.
"Of course, I wouldn't under-
stand a great deal about an atom-
ic installation," he admitted, "but
it would be something to remem-
ber seeing."
To Visit Canyon..
While in this country he will of
course see the Grand Canyon and
has seen Niagara Falls, prof. Kwei
pointed out, even though his main
purpose is to meet legal experts.
With that purpose uppermost,
he will spend the remainder of his
60-day United States visit going
to Chicago and San Francisco,
seeing Texas and New Mexico.

NOW
N
The Boldest Author of
-
Te eXCIting stal

i

i

"WRITTEN ON THE

ENDING
TONIGHT

Additional
Travel "FABULOUS LAND" * Cartoc

-----

*
*

Next Attraction .
ALAN LADD in
"THE DEkP SIX"

E I
44 1 i} " , , '' ,;i l , f fl ,,
i iN i. its ti 11 'I ,
' ! 11 . 'Flil'' i ll d u'i' 7t 11 f , d l'TS If:,! .'Id

Dial NO 8-6416

,_

The men of 2300 and 2400 corridors
of South Quadrangle announce
the formation of

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THE MICHIGAN DAISY
420 MAYNARD - OFFICE HOURS 9:00-5:00

thUa. v LU1LhisWts aU IA1
semester's ochestra
auditioned 'at this time.
cy of the instrument,
techniques and gener-
nship will be the cri-
admission. Prof. Blatt'
instrumentalists in all
I divisions of the Uni-

CAL COMEDY"

-N. Y. Daily News

THUR., FRI., SAT. ONLY
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
Production of
one of the -most hilarious, loved, and success-
ful musical comedies of our time.
1200 Broadway performances!
Winner N.Y. Drama Critics' Award!
A4MOSI(AL FA1 LE 5 B oADWAy
Based on a story and characters Book by: Jo Swerfing and
by Damon Runyon Abe Burrows
Music and Lyrics by: Frank Loesser
Directed by Ted Heusel ,
BOX OFFICE OPEN Call 8-6300
10 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. Thur. 1.50, Fri., Sat. $1.75
in LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Hotse size is limited. Get tickets early.
RELAX BETWEEN FINALS ... /
CURB-..
pRI'[ SERVICE'
Look for the Clown Special "inside your car"
and the Big Bass Drum trays for winer comfort.
at 3300 Packard. The food 'n you stay warm!
Ann Arbor's newest and
largest Drive-in Restaurant.
BIG TOP SPECIAL Lots of parking here'
Two patties of freshly
ground Beef between TAKE-OUT SERVICE
layers of o Toasted Smwonrfo . e cirlly

F-

J-HOP
TICKET SALES
LAST DAY IN
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
Tickets on sale at 2503 S.A.B
Beginning January 16th!
Hours: 9:00-5:00
$700
NO RESERVATIONS NECESSARY
1959 J-Hop-Feb. 4--9:00-2:00
with a 4:00 a.m. per.
2:30 per. for night of Feb. 3

.w.

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