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September 19, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I°HEw MICHIGAN

Intl i i rn rnrrriiw r'

GEORGE GRANGER BROWN:

Dean of Engineering College Dies During Summer

10#4

)WARD G. YVONNE, DEBRA
BINSN.DECARLO- PAGET
MARTHA JUDITH VINCENT
I SCOTT " AN DERSON "PRICE
KY.J A JACK GW155S *"fktDM P K!fMK
TIMES
12 Noon & 3:50 P.M.
oon and 3:50 and
Showing

at 8 P.M. ONLY
S SUNDAYS -
0-.8P.M.
eekday Matinees 9

Dean George Granger Brown,
head of the College of Engineer-
ing since 1951 and a member of
the University faculty for 37 years,
died late last month in Ann Arbor.
He was 60 years old.
During his career, he served the
University, government and in-
dustry in many varied capacities,
as an investigator of the causes
of collapse of a four story Con-'
sumers_ Power Company office
building in Jackson, and as direc-
for of the Engineering Division of
the Atomic Energy Commission in
1949.
The sixth dean since the found-
ing of the college in 1895, he join-
ed the University faculty in 1920
and in 1930 became a full pro-
fessor. He became head of the
metallurgical and chemical en-
gineering department in 1942, and
five years later was honored by
being named Edward DeMille
Campbell University professor of
chemical engineering, one of eight
such honorary professorships pro-
vided by the Board of.Regents for
distinguished faculty members.
Dean Brown, born in New York,
attended Erasmus High School in
Brooklyn and earned a bachelot'
of science degree in chemistry'
from New York University. In
1942, while. teaching at the Uni-
versity he recevied a master of
sciencE degree and in 1924, the
degree of doctor of philosophy.°,
He was a m- .ber of the Ameri-
can Chemical Society, the Ameri-
can Society of Testing Materials,
the American Petroleum Institute,
the Engineers Council for Pro-
fessional Development, and Phi
Beta'Kappa.
Among the honors which Dean,
Brown received were the Hanlon
Award of the National Gas Asso-
ciation in 1940 and the William
H. Walker Award of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineer-
ing in 1939.
He was instrumental in the
establishment of the first nuclear
,reactor in Michigan and in. the'
extensive physical expansion of
the College of Engineering, as well
as the institution of educational
programs designed to give en-
gineering students a greater un-.
derstanding of thebasic sciences.
In 194, Dean Brown was named
to 'deliver the Henry Russell Lec-
ture at the University..

He is survived by his wife
Dorothy Martin, and three sons:
George M. Brown, professor of
engineering at Northwestern, Jud-
son G. Brown, and David M.
Brown. Eleven grandchildren, a
brother and a sister also survive.
Contributions may, be made to
a fund designed to provide a
George Granger Brown Memorial
in the new YM-YWCA Building,
and may be brought to the office
of the Acting Dean'of Engineering,
West Engineering Building. A re-
cord of contributors names will be
given to Dean Brown's family.
Y's Increse
M"fembership
Through Drive
The Young Democrats at the
University are in the midst of
their most successful membership
-drive in many years, accordingto
Dave Soet, '57, club vice president.
+ "If the 'present trend is any in-
dication," Soet said, "our club can
anticipate a membership of one
hundred or more. This would
make this year's YD club larger
than any previous YD group at.
the University.
He also said that the group will.
operate within the new college
board organized by the state
young democratic central commit-
tee. This new design, Soet adds a,
is planned to bring the college
groups into closer working organi-
Zation.
Non-Residents
Must Pay Fee
Non-residenb students enrolling
in the University's extension serv-
ice courses will be charged $15 a
credit. hour, according to a new
policy.
Detailed announcements will be
available at the Extension Sernice
Center, 1610 Washtenaw Ave., at
registration.

U' Activates
A utomobile
Regulations
Effective ., this morning, only
those students who- are more than
21 years old; married, or residents
of Ann Arbor will be permitted
to drive cars without restrictions.
All others must conform to the
stringent regulations set dowmt in
the University's administrative
code of automobile regulations.
There are three possible rea-
sons for applying for a special
driving permit. These are: for
commuting, for business reasons
and because of health or disabil-
ity.
Commuting Students
In the first category are those
students who live more than one
and A half miles from campus,
with inadequate bus facilities'
These permits may be used for
shuttling to and from classes, and
not for social use. They also may
not be used on any except the
most direct route to campus.
An applicant for'a business per-
mit must be accompanied by a
letter from the prospective em-
ployer, stating that a car is ne-
cessary to the job. The car then
cannot be used for any except
business ,reasons, including com-
bining a business and social trip.
The third alternative, a health
or disability permit, must carry
with it a written statement from
the Director of University Health
Service. There is no social restric-
tion on such a permit.
Cars Must, Be Registered
All cars, whether operated with-
out restriction or used according
to permit regulations, must be
registered with the University,
and a fee must be paid.
For students under 21 who wish.
to use their cars as transportation
between the University and their
home, the University operates a
special "storage" service. J.
Small'.Homes
'Most Needed'
For Oldsters

ENGINEERING DEAN-George Granger Brown, head of the col-
lege of Engineering since 1951 and faculty member for 37 years,,
died last month in Ann Arbor.

DIAL
)2-3136

DOORS OPEN
AT 12:45

GET4TT 11

DIAL
NO 2-2513

Regents I
Philip Ye
A&D Dea
Philip N. Youtz of N'
was appointed Dean of
lege of Architecture an
by the Regents in July.
Dean Youtz, an archi
ceeded Dean Wells I. Be
August 1. Dean Bepnet
after 20 years' service a;
Dean Youtz, 62 years
ceived'his Bachelor of. Ai
from Amherst College an
ter of Arts in, 1919 from
College. He did graduate
architecture at Columbia
sity.
From 1946 until- his
ment Dean Youtz was a p
architect in New York
taught architecture and
phy at Columbia Univer
served as curator of a b
the Pennsylvania Museun
in Philadelphia.
During World War :
Youtz was chief of the V
duction Board's Consume
in Washington, and later
of technical research
Smaller War Plants Cor
His invention of the Yo
method of raising concre
of multi-story buildings it
by hydraulic jacks is now
spread use in the constru
dustry.

Y

"oo many triumphs
to remember ..
too many sins
to forget!

I ENGtS .

IS ONE UP!I

FUN AS

Mr' {

1 N!~OVAK
JEIF ChNLER
AGpM)OOuij

oO

Start the'New Semester
Right, with White

WH.SP

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SN EAK PREVIEW
Friday Night at 9 o'clock!

We cannot divulge
title... It is a comedy

TION IS. M,6111E

1 ;

Come at

7 or 9 P.M.

I

SH HIT!" N.Y. Daily News
W!' Cue Magazine
. . . additional . .
RTOON "TOBASCO ROAD"
T "HUNTERS OF THE SEA"

SATURDAY
CARY GRANT
DEBORAH KERR
in I
"AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER"
TONY RANDALL IS COMING,
In the Wacky, Rousing Laugh Treat
"WILL SUCCESS SPOIL 'ROCK HUNTER"

<< SIZES 3 to I1
Kf
Famous Ked features
Scientific last, shock proof arch-cushion,
cushiongd insoles, 2nd duo-life counters

Small, low-rent homes and
apartments are the most needed
type of housing for elderly per-
sons in America, according to Wil-
ma Donahue, chairman of the
University's Division of Gerontol-
ogy.
Of the 4 million people 65 or
over, 1.5 million are single' indi-
viduals who maintain their own
house, or apartment, and nearly
2.5 million are couples who main-
tain their own household, accord-
ing to census statistics.'
Mrs. Donahue notes that large
houses become increasingly diffi-
cult for elderly persons to operate,
yet nearly three-fifths of the el-
derly married couples live in
homes containing five rooms or
more. They must maintain these
houses larger than they need be-
cause ofeconomic necessity, sen-j
timnent, or inertia.
Lenders Reluctant
Most elderly people live in the
homes they acquired when much
younger because lenders have
been reluctant to make long term
loans to persons of advanced age.
The housing act passed by Con-
gress in 1956 has eased this situ-
ation somewhat by sponsoring
housing .developments for people
Over 65.
T he act allows sponsors of these
special housing projects to grant
rental subsidies to elderly tenants
if they desire. It has also made it
easier for elderly people to fi-
nance home purchases.,
Notes Improved Means
Mrs. Donahue also notes that
the Federal Housing Administra-
tion has provided improved means
for older persons who are already
home owners to "trade-in" their
homes' for smaller ones better
suited to their needs.
This means that many older
persons have been put in a better'
position to finance the purchase
of small homes for .their retire-
ment, she observes.'

a
i
.
R
..
.

Fraternity
Loses Righ
To Initiate
(Continued frotki Page

the

ANN ARBOR CLOTHING

your

or. The rule pertains o
ganizations which were
after the ruling.
Kennedy Shaw, sec1
for Phi Gamma Delta
Daily that until 1950
been a clause limiting
ship to caucasian, Christ
the constitution calls for
"compatible" to the ent
nity.
There are Jewish s'tut
orientals in the fraternil
Hbwever, in a letter,
Gam chapters, the offic
Amherst house explaine
Archons defined compa1
necessarily in terms ofi
merit.
Shaw explained that i
room concept" of choosi
had been transferred t
tire fraternity by the t
A Negro student pr
wouldn't be considered c
by a Phi Gamn at a
school, he said.
He also emphasized
convention would be
by undergraduates anid
action would be their d
Shaw also remarked.
herst College, as ma
Eastern schools, "there
responsible fraternity
ment." In fact, the mem
even eat at the house.
Local selection, wh
chapter chooses its me
its own standards, ma'
cussed at the conveni
Burt and Shaw said. I
cautioned, loss of co:
alumni support and the
moral implications of wh
right to limit a fraternil
bership must be carefu:
ined.
In 1946 the Amherst
Trustees resolved that
"no prohibition or restr
reason of race, color, or
fecting the selection, of:r
of its fraternities.
Last fall, the Admi
sent a letter to all its fr
asking them to re-affirm
ing. Phi Gan answeredIV
was a conflict between
rules and Phi Gam poll
AIR CONDITION
'the
BROWNJ

HICHMAN BROS. CLOTHING STORE

306 SOUTH STATE

As

,'

ire AnnA rbor

SUITS. .. . " " f " s s *f '." $39.95-$44.95
SPORT COATS ."."ss.f.s..."$24.95-$29.95
TOPCOATS w v " ".s. .+ " " " o .r. $3.95
ZIP COATS e. . . . . . . . . . . . . $.95

mnseosre.,
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