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January 09, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-09

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THE MCMGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, JAWUARY

--Daily-David Arnold
LAVING MOTHER - The taunts ,of Sara's drunken mother,
played by Lorraine Small, anger the priest, portrayed by Philip
Berns, who is considering a request to perform the marriage.
The Tinkers Wedding" will be presented tomorrow in the Lydia
.endelssohn Theatre.
peech Department To Give
)ne-Act Plays on Weekend

Willow Run
Plant Town
Reprived
Willow Village, a product of
World War II, built to house pro-
duction workers at the Willow Run
bomber plant, has been given a
new lease on life.
Condemned to be razed twice
before, the Ypsilanti Township
Board Tuesday extended the dead-
line for demolition of the Village
to Oct. 31, 1960.
The Board acted on a recom-
mendation by Trustee Paul E.
Clark after reaching an agree-
ment with the Willow Woods De-
velopment Co. The development
company is undertaking a project
to redevelop the area:
With over 1,200 families living
in Willow Village, more than 100
families have moved into, or have
received permits to move into,
new housing in the Ypsilanti town-
ship area.
The dormitory-styled buildings
of the Village were purchased by
Ypsilanti township three years ago
from the federal government. State
law required that they be torn
down by June 30,1958.
Last year, the State Legislature
extended the deadline for razing
the former governmental housing
projects for two years, until June
30, 1960.
When the land is finally cleared,
it is expected that 40 acres of the
Village will be made available for
low-cost rental housing. Township
discussion on this project has been
deferred until next Wednesday.
Many of the families moving out
of Willow-"Village are purchasing
low-cost "221" homes in the town-
ship area.
G&S Society
To Orga nize
Gilbert & Sullivan Society will
hold an organizational meeting
at 7:30 p.m. tonight at the Mich-
igan League.
The group will plan the activi-
ties for the coming semester, in
partidular the production . of the
Gilbert & Sullivan operetta, H.-
M.S. Pinafore."
Sign-ups for auditions for chor-
us, leads, production, stage-crew
and orchestra will take place at
this final meeting of the semester.

-Daily-Eric Arnold
GUEST SOLOIST-James F. Burke, guest coinetist with the
University Symphony Band, glances over some music with director
Prof. William D. Revelli. Burke, solo cornetist with the Goldman
Band of New York City, will appear in the mid-winter Symphony
Band Concert tobe held at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
Included in the selections will be Burke's own composition, "Magic
Trumpet."

Symphony Band To Play Jones Finds

"The Tinkers Wedding" by J.
M. Synge, "Overlaid" by ,Robert-
son Davies, and "The Shewing-Up
of Blonco Ponset" by George Ber-
nard Shaw will be presented by
the speech department at 8 p.m.
tomorrow and Saturday in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
This Laboratory Bill of three
one-act plays is being acted, di-
rected, designed and costumed by
students in theatre courses at the
University. Admission will be fifty
cents.
"The Tinkers Wedding" is a
light folk comedy of the Irish
Theater The Tinkers themselves
are a gypsy-like people Who still
exist in the western part of Ire-
land.
The marriage of a Tinker wom-
an, Sarah Casey, played by Sara
Fruchtbaum, '58, is the basis of
the plot. Her problems concern a
Pals Grant
4Made to U
Presentation of a quarterly in-
' stallment of a $4,968 research
grant from the United Cerebral
Palsy Research and Educational
Foundation, Inc., was made to the
University yesterday.
Dr. Emmet R. Costich, president
of the Washtenaw County affiliate
of United Cerebral Palsy, pre-
sented the check for $1,240 to Dr.
A. C. Furstenberg dean of the
University Medical School.
.,The foundation was organized
in 1949 and this grant is part of
the overall research program for
which nearly $3 million has been
allocated.
,1Certain drugs have been found
to produce muscle relaxants by
acting upon the brain and spinal
cord. Dr. Edward Domino, profes-
sor of. pharmacology, is studying
these reactions.
Group To Give
Goethe Play
'The German Reading Group
will give their first public reading
at 7:30 'p.m. tomorrow in the West
Conference Room of the Rackham
Building.
The Group, composed of mem-
bers of 'the German depatment,
will read "Torquato Tasso" by
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.
The classical drama published
ix .-1790 and presented in 1807 at
Weimar contains five acts in blank
verse, and treats the problem of
the artist in society.
German Instructors Ingo ,Seid-
ler, Mary Chrichton, Frederic Tu-
bac, Frank Lambasa and Teach-
ing Fellow Edelgard DuBruck will
read the parts in the critical
drama.
WUOM Heads
Survey Ratmg
Radio station WUOM of the
University took first place in the
survey by the National Association
of Educational Broadcasters.
The 19 University broadcasts
covered such fields as American
History, International Affairs,
Literature and the Arts. Music,
Sociology, Gerontology and Medi-
cine were other subjects included
in the more than 200 individual
programs.
The University of Illinois was
awarded second place, with Lowell
Institute in Boston third. Michi-
gan State University and The
University of Wisconsin placed
fourth and fifth, respectively.

drunken mother, a reprobate priest
and a reluctantpartner.
"Overlaid" Called Best
In a unique twist of plot, the
marriage ultimately depends on a
tin can. Richard Flasher, '59, will
portray the husband-to-be.'
"Overlaid" has been termed one
of the best Canadian one-act
plays. It has been done on the
stage and as a CBC production on
the air.
The play centers around Pop, as
portrayed by James Young, Grad.,
who claims to be the bohemian
set of Smith Township all yin one
man. Ethel, his daughter, played
by Connie Kessler, '58, and George
Bailey, played by Richard Schiller,
'59, are the other main characters.
To Present Shaw
Shaw's play, "Shewing-Up of
Blanco Posnet," is a satire on the
ridiculous use of law in the early
West. The play is set in a saloo
and features a large cast, unusual
in a one-act play.
The plot concerns the capture
and trial of a horse thief. Feemy
Evans, played by Stephanie Fan-
tle, '60, and Blanco Posnet, Herb
Kline, '58, are the main charac-
ters.'

Greatest Aid
In Teachers
Good teachers are the most im-
portant assets to modern educa-
tion, a University education spe-
cialist said recently.
Prof. Phillip S. Jones of, the
mathematics department said the
need in mathematics is for
"enough good teachers-men and
women who teach arithmetic and
mathematics for meaning and un-
derstanding."
Good teaching of mathematics
requires that the teacher have "an
understanding which extends be-
yond that which must be imparted*
to his students," Prof. Jones em-
phasized.
Need Planning Time
A successful teacher must do
more than "turn the crank" to
get the answers, the University
educator observed. He must also
know how the "machine" oper-
ates.
Time and planning are required
for successful teaching, the teach-
er must gather educational ma-
terials after planning their use,
he said.
Materials for an arithmetic
teacher might include beads, toy
money, or bottletops. Prof. Jones
noted the importance of teaching
within the context of the child's
daily life but added arithmetic
should also be taught as an ab-
stract-logical-thing.
Praises Elementary Teachers
If the teacher can combine the
practical and abstract concepts of
mathematics, the student "will see
that the power of mathematics
lies in its abstraction and gen-
erality which makes it possible to
apply one rule to many different
problems."
Commenting that "elementary
teachers are one of the hardest
working and most dedicated
groups we have," the University
educator said that the elementary
teacher must "know English, social
studies, play the piano, sing,
work with arts and crafts and
direct the playground"
Prof. Jones also said elementary
teachers need more instruction in
fundamental ideas of arithmetic.
Many Not Informed
"In secondary mathematics,"
Prof. Jones observed, "the big
problem is that even teachers who
would be considered well-trained
by many criteria" are not inform-
ed about some important topics
"in modern mathematics."
Topics such as sets, symbolic
logic, axiomatics, finite geometries,
calculus, and analytic geometry
are now being advocated for high
school math courses.
He noted that many schools are
now considering special classes for
superior or gifted students.

"Because challenging and con-
troversial, themes are avoided in
most TV programming, our view-
ing fare tends to be reduced to
colorless, innocuous pap," Prof.
Edgar Willis of the speech depart-
ment claims.
With few exceptions, he noted,
"the bland leads the bland in an
endless parade across our TV
screens."
Prof. Willis, writing in the
Michigan Business Review, called
it unfortunate that "advertisers
sensitivity regarding program con-
tent does not apply equally to the
commercials they condone."
He noted that the requirement
that equal time be given to oppos-
ing points of view coupled with
advertiser's fear of controversy
"tends to diminish the kind of
attention to public issues that
democracy needs."
Suggesting that United States
TV might follow the lead of the
Coming Next WeekI
Jan. 16, 17, 18
One of the most hilarious,
loved, and successful musical
comedies of our time.

a-

I

kill

British in eliminating "absurd a:
sometimes damaging restriction
imposed by advertisers, he said
England, advertisers are offer
programs on a "take-it-or-leav
it" basis.
\ a Dial NO 2-2513
Hilarity
That
Refreshes !
COME ONE
COME ALL
COME OFTEN

Speech Teacher Condemn
'Bland' TV Programming

I

TO PERFORM HERE:

ITA:

'NA

University Musical Society
To Present Vienna Boys Choir

The Vienna Choir Boys wills
make their 14th appearance in
Ann Arbor when they perform at
2:30 p.m. Sunday in Hill Auditor-
ium.
The three-part concert is being
sponsored by the University Musi-
cal Society as part of the Extra
Concert Series.%
The youngsters, under the direc-
tion of S. Hurok, will present a
program consisting of religious
songs, a one-act comic opera andj
a series of folk songs. The opera,
"The Village Barber," by Johann
Schenk, will be done in costume.-
The choir is made up of 22 boys
from eight to 14 years old, chosen
from among the 100 youths at
the Konvikt School, where the'
group originates. Two other choirs
are also on tour during the year,
and the boys are alternated be-
tween them.

A prospective Choir Boy spends
two years training, after which he
joins one of the choir groups. He
remains a choir boy until his
voice changes, but continues at-
tending the school and, if he wish-
es, receives a musical education.
Civic Theatre
To DMusical
"Guys and Dolls," Broadway
musical comedy hit five years ago,
will be presented Jan.<16, 17 and
18 at the Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre by the Ann Arbor Civic The-
atre.
Ted Heusel will direct the cast
of 35 in this New York Drama
Critics' Award-winning play.
"Guys and Dolls" with music by
Frank Loesser is based on a story
and characters by Damon Runyon.
Tickets will be sold next week
at the Lydia Mendelssohh Theatre
box office. Seats will be $1.50 for
the Jan. 16 performance and $1.75
for the other shows.

based on a story and
characters by Damon Runyon
Book by: Jo Swerling and
Abe Burrows
Music and Lyrics by:
Frank Loesser
presented by,
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
Ted Heusel, Director
in
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Opens
t0A.M. Mon., Jan. 13
Get tickets early for this sure hit!

Groucho Marx:
"One of the fun-
niest pictures
I've ever seen!"
JOSE GRECO
TICKETS ON SALE
1 TO 5 P.M: DAiLY

4,

-4

I

Starts
TODAY

, &
Just like a tri
to Japan!

DIAL
NO 2-3136

VISITING LIBRARIAN SAYS:
Asia Collections Need Improvement

By THOMAS TURNER'
American library collections on
Asia need considerable improve-
ment, head librarian J. D. Pear-
son of the School of Oriental and
African Studies of London Univer-
sity told The Daily yesterday.
The British librarian came to
this country in November to at-
tend a Library of Congress confer-
ence on Asian collections in tear
libraries. He is at present "spend-
ing a good deal of time looking at
the Far. Eastern Library" here at
the University, as part of a series
of visits to American universities
with large collections from the
Near and Far East.
"These areas are becoming more
and more important to America,"
Pearson pointed out, and it will
'be necessary to improve the flow
of publications from countries
there to the United States.
The problem as described by
Pearson has two aspects: finding
out what's being published, and
getting hold of it. The Asian coun-
tries should have national bibliog-
raphies of books they publish,
Pearson said.
While in Ann Arbor, Pearson
has been discussing "Possibilities
of, cooperation between British
and American librarians" with G.
Raymond Nunn of the Far Eastern
Library. Similar discussions have
taken place between Pearson and
the Near Eastern Library staff.
The University, Pearson com-
mented, is quite different from
London University.
This school, he said, is much
more similar to Cambridge Uni-
versity where he did his under-
graduate work. Students are much
the same everywhere, he com-
mented.
The visiting Britisher's impres-
sions of student life here are quite
vivid, he declared, describing a
visit to the Pretzel Bell and the
coming-of-age celebrations going
on there. One girl, Pearson said,_
"threw an egg against the ceiling,
an old American custom, no
doubt."
Pearson has also visited the Law
Library and the Undergraduate
Library. He described the latter
as "out of this world, an, expres-
sion I've picked up in this coun-
try," but called its audio room "a
great luxury, though perhaps
necessary.

--_----

DINING ROOM

From the Geisha Houses to the For-
bidden Pagoda, from hidden fishing
village to teeming Tokyo alleys in a
far-off exotic land.
in'_5apa4=
,,N>TECHNIRAATECHNICOLORO p
STARRING
TERESA WRIGHT- CAMERON MITCHELL
COSTARRIN4
JON PROVOST.ROGER NAKACAWAwITHRILP OBIR HNIKO NIYAKE

ePARTI ES,
F OOD AT

DINNERS
ITS BEST

WE WELCOME WEEKEND GUESTS -

Added

. Color Cartoon and Sports

I.C.C. Presents
TOM LEHR E R
and
JO MAPES
(in person)
Sat., Jan. 11 - 8:30 P.M.
Ann Arbor High Auditorium
Tickets $1.20, $1.80, $2.40
Available at
The Disc Shop & Liberty Music (State St.)

-Daily-Eric Arnold
ENGLISH LIBRARIAN-J. D. Pearson of London University was
invited to Washington to offer advice on Asian collections in
American libraries. He has visited the Ivy League schools and
upon leaving the University will go to the University of California,
which has a large Far Eastern library.

7

DANCE AT THE UNION
BLUE BOOK BLUES
MUSIC by
Jim Servis' Orchestra

TONIGHT and FRIDAY
7:00 and 9:20
"The Grapsof Wrath"
t
HENRY FONDA
JANE DARWELL
CHARLIE GRAPEWIN
JOH N CARRADINE
o*
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
"Anrocles and the. Lion"
ALAN YOUNG

11

.. trii1 11 }t Ilti ( j n jllt111rmm ,naimnnt tlt4{tt1

T
T

9-12
Sat., Jan. 11

$1.50 per couple
Union Ballroom

m Impl

'ON IG HT Week Nigh
hru Sat. at 7 and S
Dial NO 8-6416
OWN-
"ROLLICKING ENGLISH COMEDY!
Frank Launder and Sidney Gilliat have done it again
with 'The Green Man'. Crazy, incredible ...
flammable and fun!"-Bosley Crowther, N. Y. Times
"A MASTERPIECE OF COMEDY...a joy to
watch . .. Alastair Sim is one of the funniest men in
the public domain today, and this movie gives him
total freedom. Brilliant!"-wm. K. Zinser, Herald Tribune

Its
9

IN PERSON

JO SE
AN -pf w

On Stage
MONDAY,
JANUARY 13
at 8:30 P.M.

__ _ a F

I

"DESERVES OUR THANKS!" I

11

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