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December 17, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HIGH SCHOOL STUDY:
Survey Shows No Lack
In Math, Science Fields
By, SUSAN HOLTZER
science and more mathema
There is no lack of mathematics the superior and gifted chil
and science courses being offered "There is, of course, a n
in Michigan high schools, accord- move further in this dire
ing to a special study made for Leach continued, "especiall
U n i v e r s i t y President Harlan accelerated programs when
Hatcher by the Bureau of School perior and gifted childre:
Services. have greater opportunities c
The report states that, on the ing work of an advanced l
contrary, the subjects that seem so that they can enter c
to be slighted are: 1) art; 2) or- with advanced standing.
chestra and string work; 3) boys' "This is being done mor
vocal work; 4) foreign language; more by the larger high s(
5) a diversified program of social So far, very few small high s
science, and 6) physical education' are moving in this directio
Of the state's 800 secondary Leach warned p a r t i c u
schools, the 668 accredited by the against basing conclusions c
University were covered by the u o
survey. Data was g a t h e r e d ceding years, saying "progrf
through examination of class schools change as rapidly
schedules regularly .sent by the men's fashions."
high schools to the Bureau.
In the mathematics and science sDurin hble sto re intem
fields, over 90 per cent of the curate data," Leach conl
schools offer the f o 11 o w i n g
courses: algebra, plane geometry, stave a wORLD of F
biology, chemistry and physics.0
Over 50 per cent offer interme- Travel with f
diate or advanced algebra and s
general science, and one-third Unbelievable Low

IL

-Daily-Harold Gassenhetmer
NEAR EAST DEPARTMENT GROWS-Assoc. Prof. George E. Mendenhall, 6f the Near East studies
department, discusses a series of plaster casts of various Assyrian reliefs from the period 850 B.C.
The class, "Historical Background of the Bible," is open to both graduate students and upperclassmen.
Departmet o Near Easter Studies
Die Pe
Shows Growth in Five-Year Period
By THOMAS HAYDEN~ partmental enrollment has dou- agreement over the basic reasons
Five years ago, the University's bled. involved.
Near Eastern studies department All of which leads to the ques- Grown Since War
included five instructors. tion: why has the department sud- The department has grown since
Today its staff roster has grown denly become one of the nation's the second world war "when the
to a total of 15 full-time professors busier centers of Near Eastern United States became aware that
and two part-time instructors. study. its knowledge of some parts of the
In the same period of time, de- Two experts are in general globe was totally inadequate," Prof.
George E. Cameron said,
Prof. George E. Mendenhall also
EmPoyient as Fair Guides ,agreed that interest in the Near
East has developed greatly since
Opened to University Students Wo'Waid States todais
more aware of other sections of
Employment as guides at the the globe," Prof. Mendenhall said,
United States' exhibit at the Brus- Employees will receive travel ex- "in contrast with its isolationist
sels World Fair next year has been penses, living accommodations, an attitude of the 1920's."
opened to qualified University stu- allowance of $5 per day for living Several factors, including oil in-
dents. expenses and a salary of $150 per vestments and international poli-
Qualifications for employment month+ tics, are also contributing to the
include United States citizenship. ._-._ growing interest, he added.
Applicants'msut also be'single, or 'U' Supports Interest
if married, both husband and wife Organization The University supports this
must be qualified for employment. . feeling through - its Near East
Prospective guides must have Notices studies program "in almost un-
two years of college training or the precedented fashion," Prof. Cam-
equivalent and be between the The Student automobile regulations eron observed. He is proud of the
ages of 19 and 25 years old. They will be lifted for Christmas vacation increase in number of teachers
must be able to furnish a doctor's from 5 p.m. Fri., Dec. 20, to 8 a.m., and the "excellent library hold-
certificate of excellent health and Mon., Jan. 6, 1958. ings."
meet standards of security. / Sigma Alpha Eta, Christmas Party, The upswing in Near Eastern
Must Speak French Dec. 17, 7:30, Union. interest has not been confined just
b. * * to the University, Prof. Menden-
Applicants must als be able to Balet class, modern jazz class, Dec. hall claimed. "Rather," he pointed
carry on conversation of moderate 17, 7:15 p.m., and 8:15 p.m., Barbour out, "it is being reflected around
complexity in French. Preference * * the country. More and more
will be given to those students who GULLR Ski Club, weekly meeting, Dec. schools have developed such de-
so have a soigknowledge of 18, 7:30 p.m., 3rd floor Union. Final partments.
Flemish, Spanish, German or Ital- plans for the vacation ski trip. "One of our main goals," Prof.
Vice-President for Student Af- Arab club, panel discussion, Dec. 17, Mendenhall said, "is to make sure
8:00 p.m., Rm.: 3529 SAB. Moderator: undergraduates become aware of
fairs James A. Lewis said Friday Mr. Ali A. Mahgoub, Pres. Arab Club. the Near Eastern contributions.

E

KENT W. LEACH
... bureau director

carry solid geometry and trigon-
ometry courses.
"Most of the accredited high
'schools in Michigan are attempt-
ing to organize their classes in
science and mathematics around
the abilities, needs and plans of
their pupils," Kent Leach, Direc-
tor of the Bureau, said. "There is
a sincere attempt to offer more

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