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December 14, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-14

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I

14, 1957

T RE MICHIGAN DAILY

14, 1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UCLA,

USC,

California

Leave

PCC

Action Ends

Lon Period
Of Feuding
Stanford May Also
Lpave 'Conference
LOS ANGELES (P)-Three big
powers of the Pacific Coast Con-
ference-University of California,
UCLA and University of Southern
California - yesterday decided to
pull out of the 42-year-old league.
The. USC board of trustees set
the Trojans' withdrawal date as
}~ on or after July 1, 1958.
The board of. regents for the
4 California universities at Berkeley
and Los Angeles voted to end their
membership June 30, 1959.
Climax
The action climaxed a year and
a half of bitterness within the
conference which began in the
summer of 1956 when heavy pen-
alties were imposed on USC,
UCLA, California and Washington
for excessive aid to athletes.
The governing bodies of the
three schools said they would ful-
fill their obligations to the con-
ference until they leave.
Many observers feel that Stan-
ford also will withdraw and that
the PCC will be wrecked.
The bitterness of Cal, UCLA and
USC against the PCC had inten-
sified since the conference turned
a cold shoulder .last June to a
five-point athletic policy program
adopted by the California regents
and a similar eight-point program
set up by USC.
Pact in Doubt
The immediate status of the
Rose Bowl pact between the PCC
and the Big Ten was unknown.
The conference's troubles be-
came public scandal when the pen-
alties were slapped on UCLA, USC,
Cal and -Washington.-
UCLA was put on probation for
three years, USC and Washington
for two years and Cal for one'year.
They were fined a total of more
than , $250,000. UCLA, USC and
Washington were denied the right
to represent the conference in the
New. Year's Day Rose Bowl game
during their probation. Nearly 100
football players lost a year of
eligibility. The conference later
relented and allowed players who
had been freshmen in 1955 to play
five games in their senior year.

GAME ON HOME COURT:
Washington Opposes
Michigan Five Tonight

STAN SMITH
... only returnee

Big Ten
Increases
Grid Games
. CHICAGO (IP) - The Big Ten
last night approved ',a proposal
that conference football teams be
permitted to play 10 games, start-
ing with the 1959 season.
In other action, conference fac-
ulty representatives and athletic
directors rejected Iowa's attempt
to relax the controversial finan-
cial aid program for athletes.
The proposal to increase the
number of football games any con-
ferenceteam can play is subject
to approval by faculty directors
of thenindividual schools.
If no school objects to the plan
within the next 60 days, it will
stand. If one or more schools do
object within that period, then the
matter will be suspended until the
March conference meeting.
At the same time, the policy-
making faculty representatives
tackled another touchy proposal.
It was a suggestion by the Uni-
versity of Illinois to put a curb
on so-called "stock-piling" of ath-,
letes by keeping them in school
five years instead of the custom-
ary four.4

By HAL APPLEBAUM
Remembering last year's upset
defeat the Wolverine's of Michi-
gan will meet the Bear's of Wash-
ington of St. Louis tonight in Yost
Field House at 8 p.m.
Last year in St. Louis the Wol-
verines blew a fifteen point half-
time lead and succumbed to the
Bears 72-69 in overtime. The vic-
tory was Washington's first over
Michigan in five contests and it
also marked the first time that a
Washington team beat a repre-
sentative of the Big Ten.
Coach Bill Perigo commented
on that game by saying, "We 'just
fell apart in the second half. We
played a poor game. It was a dis-
appointing evening, very similar to
the one in Pittsburgh last week."
Four Starters Graduated
Four of last year's starters have
graduated and Washington Coach
Blair Gullion is relying on sopho-
mores and last year's reserves.
Stan Smith 5'10" guard is the only
returning starter. Joining him in
the starting line up are seniors
Harvey Maack, 5'11" guard and
Don Garrett, 6'1" forward, sop zo-
mores Harold Patton, 6'1" forward
and Jim Hascall, 6'6" center.
So far this season the Bears
have compiled a two win and two
loss record. They have beaten Ari-
zona and Missouri College of
Mines while losing to Wisconsin
and Texas Western.
Washington plays, a deliberate
ball control offense and as a re-
sult the scores of most of their
games are low. The most points
they have scored in one game
Beliveau Idled
Indefinitely
MONTREAL (A)-Jean Beliveau,
the Montreal Canadiens star cen-
ter, will be out of action indef-
initely because of a rib injury,
club officials announced yesterday.
Unofficial speculation was that
Beliveau will be out a minimum of
two Weeks.
Beliveau was injured late in
Thursday night's National Hockey
League game with the New York
Rangers, won 3-2 by Montreal.
this season was 63 against Mis-

souri Mines. The defense has been
stingy, limiting their four oppo-
nents to average of 48 points per
game. The most scored against
them was 53 also by Missouri
Mines.
Tough Opponent
Wolverine Coach Bill Perigo
stated, "Washington is a tough
opponent. They beat us once and
it could happenagain. A ball con-
trol team might hamper our run
and shoot offense.
"We are still experimenting with
our lineup, but we will probably
go with the lineup we used against
South Dakota State on Wednes-
day," he concluded. That is M. C.
Burton and Randy Tarrier at for-
wards, Pete Tillotson at center,
Bill Wright and George Lee at the
guards."
The Wolverines will be seeking
to extend their home court win
streak to seven. This includes four
games last year as well as this
year's victories over Nebraska and
South Dakota State.
Track Squad
Holds- Time
Trials Today
By BOB ROMANOFF
Michigan's track team will hold
time trials, today, in Yost Field-
house at 2 p.m., which will be open
to the public free of charge.
Assistant Coach Elmer Swanson
defines time trials as, "a fancy
name for formal workouts." De-
spite this fact they are valuable
because they will give the coaches
and fans a chance to rate the
progress of this year's team.
Odd Distances
No field events will be held. Of-
interest however, are the races
that will be run at odd distances
not run in formal meets, such as
660 yds., and 1000 yds.
This year's squad will sorely
miss Dave Owen, Big Ten and
NCAA shot put champion; Liard
Sloan, Canadian Olympian quar-
termiler; Bob Rudesill, quarter
miler; Dick Flodin, sprinter;
Chuck Morton, distance runner;
and Ron Kramer, and Ken Bot-
toms, weight man, all lost through
graduation.
Brighter Side
On the brighter side, however,
is the return of Jim Pace, Big Ten
60-yd. indoor dash titlist and Fin-
nish Olympian Eeles Landstrom,
Big Ten pole vault champion. Both
should highlight the trials.
In addition, nine of the 21 soph-
omores stand out. They are sprint-
er Freeman Watkins and Pete
Parker; Quint Sterling' in the
quarter-mile; Pete Stanger' and
Ron Trowbridge, hurdlers; 4Earl
Deardorff and Cam Gray, distance
men; Don Deskins, shot putter,
and Jerry Bushong, discus.

LINEUPS
MICHIGAN P WASHINGTON
Tamrer F Garrett
Burton F Patton
Tillotson C Hascall
Lee G Smith
Wright G' Maack
SUPREME:
Varsity
Tankers
'Take Mee-t
By CARL RISEMAN
Michigan's varsity swimmers
trounced the freshmen last night
at the Varsity Exhibition Pool,
103-71.
Only in the first race of the
evening were the freshmen close
as their two entries took a second
and a third to give them ten
points, enough for a tie with the
varsity after one race.
But starting with the 220-yd.
freestyle, the first of many indi-
vidual events, the varsity quickly
began to pull away.
Hanley Winner
Dick Hanley, swimming in his
only race of the evening, churned
the distance in 2:06.2, which is
regarded as a very fast time for
this early in the season.k
In the 50-yd. freestyle, the
freshmen racked up their only tri-
umph by gaining a first, fourth
and fifth place. Frank Legacki was
the winner.
Tony Tashnick displayed fine
formh by taking two firsts for the
varsity. He defeated Hopkins in
the 200-yd. individual medley in
a very close race. He later won
the 200-yd. butterfly.
Fries Wins Grind
A " last minute sprint by Pete
Fries was enough to gain an edge
over fast closing Carl Wooley in
the 440-yd. freestyle. Fries,
Wooley and freshman Tom Bucy
had been bunched up for most of
the 17 laps of the grueling race,
but Fries pulled away at the fin-,
ish. His time of 4:52.2 was hisj
best time in the event.
Other winners were Al Matin in
the 200-yd. breaststroke, Lee Cor-
by in the 100-yd. freestyle, Don
Adamski in the 200-yd. back-
stroke, and Dick Kimball in the
diving competition.
COLLEGE SCORES
Mississippi St. 66, Miami 63
Pitt 68, Geo. Washington 59
Xavier (Ohio 70, Marshall 68

San Francisco
Title Chances
Look Brigpht
Only one game remains on the
schedule for all the teams in the
Western Division in the NFL, but
it may make or break a season.
For the three contenders for the
crown, San Francisco, Detroit and
Baltimore, all tied with 7-4 rec-
ords, the game this Sunday is a
must.
The other teams, the Chicago
Bears, Los Angeles and Green Bay,
have had disappointing seasons. A
win would be welcomed.
San Francisco has the best
chance for the title. No injuries to
key players, and the weakest op-
position of the three in Green Bay
should spell the difference. Detroit
meets the Bears, while Baltimore
meets Los Angeles.
In the Eastern Division, cham-
pion Cleveland meets second-place
New York. Washington ends its
season against Pittsburgh Sunday.
The Cards meet Philadelphia to-
day in the Saturday television
game.

I

l

WILBUR JUST WOKE UP TO
HE FACT THAT HEM (N CLASS

KEEP ALERT FOR A
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Don't let 'that "drowsy feel.
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. .. or when you're "hitting
the books". Take a NoDoz
Awakener! In a'few minutes,
you'll be your normal best...
wide awake . , , alert! Yout
doctor will tell you-NoDoz
Awakeners are safe as coffee.
Keep a pack handy!
15 TABLETS, 3ae
35 tablets #I #
in handy tin
69c

McDonald Inured in Wolverine Win;
Icers Slated for Second Game Tonight

(Continued from Page 1)

there is a good possibility that the
injury might only be a serious
sprain. McDonald spent last night
in the Grand Forks General hos-
pital but there is a chance that he
'may be back in action again to-
night.
It was not until 6:28 in the open-
ing period when the Wolverines
finally managed to get the puck
out of their own zone for the first
time, and they made it a success-
tul start. Right wing, Bob White,
skated around and behind the
Sioux defense and centered the
puck for Gary Starr who blazed it
past Sioux goalie, Bob Peters, to
* give Michigan a 1-0 lead.
Exactly six minutes later, War-
ren Wills scored the goal that
actually proved to be the decisive
marker. Gary Unsworth, shot the
puck to wing Gary Mattson, who
then dropped it for Wills, and the
sophomore defense man scored on
a slap shot from the blue line.
Rough Game
Throughout the entire game, the
play was exceedingly rough and
somewhat ragged. But compen-
sating for this was the standout
play of the Michigan defense corps
and particularly Childs, who made

21 saves in the game, 12 of them
in the initial period.
Last year's WIHL second high-,
est scorer, Jim Ridley, got his first'
goal of the conference season at
17:02 to put the Sioux back in the
game.
But 90 seconds later, Don Mc-
Intosh, getting an assist from
Starr and the second assist of the.
STATISTICS
FIRST P ER I 0 D: Scoring,
Michigan -- Starr (White) 6:28;
Wills (Mattson, U n s w o r t h)
12:24; North Dakota - Ridley
(Poole) 17:02; Michigan - Mc-
Intosh (White, Starr) 18:34.
Penalties: Michigan-Switzer
(broken stick) :18; Michigan -
Mattson (high sticking) 3:53;
North Dakota - Willems (high
sticking) 3:53; North Dakota-
Willems (slashing) 17:41; Mich-
igan-Hudson (hooking) 18:54.
SECOND PERIOD: No sgor-
ing.
Penalties: Michigan-Hayton
(freezing puck) 13:24; Michi-
gan - Hayton (misconduct)
13:24.
THIRD PERIOD: No scoring.
Penalties: Michigan - Wills
(freezing puck) 3:13.

night for White, blasted the puck
into the nets for a 3-1 lead, and
a sufficient margin for the rest
of the contest.
McDonald was not the only in-
jury for Michigan last night. Delky
Dozzi as shaken up in the second
period and had to be taken out of
the game. But he will definitely
play tonight,

r U

U

Going to
WILLOW RUN?
Take a
Yellow & Checker Cab!!
Call NO 3-4244
Make reservations early!
*

C.OLLEGE GRADUATES
' (Salary $4,802 to start)
STATE GOVERNMENT OFFERS COMPREHENSIVE
TRAINING; PROGRAMS IN:
*ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYSIS
*EMPLOYMENT COUNSELING
*PERSONNEL
*ECONOMIC RESEARCH
*HIGHWAY PLANNING
BANK EXAMINING
PROPERTY APPRAISING
INSURANCE EXAMINING
INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT
*GEOLOGY
*WATER CONSERVATION
*GAME BIOLOGY
*FISH AREA BIOLOGY
*FISHERIES BIOLOGY
*LAND APPRAISING
*PAROLE AND PROBATION (Male only)
*PRISON COUNSELING (Male only)

I

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