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December 12, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICGAN DAILY Tx

OBLEM, GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT:
s Emphasizes Ghanean Education

Recommend

Townes Cites Salary Problem in Biol

thr nIa
resident Joe
d while vis-
. of Ghana
Ltional poll-
nation.)
CNER
lost crucial
anean gov-
me time, it
ment," Joe
i as he dis-
to the Af-
Ghanean
saying its

Of

s;

ti

Im proved
Dfru Use
By CONNIE MAHONSKE
Better pharmacy and prescrip-
tion services for patients in small-
er hospitals is the 'goal of the
pharmacy college researchers in-
vestigating pharmaceutical serv-
ices in Michigan hospitals of less
than 100 beds.
The study was made possible
through a state legislative grant.
Because of the survey's complexity
and definite worth, this grant was
extended into the second year. A
preliminary study including the
data gathered thus far will be re-
leased in the December issue of
the American Professional Phar-
macist.
The purpose of the study is to
'"accorhplish something tangible
to imirove pharmaceutical serv-
ices in small hospitals, especially'
those which at this time do not
employ a professional pharma-
cist" according to Prof. Alex Ber-
man, of the pharmacy college,
who is directing the survey.
that a professional pharmacist,
"In many small h o s p i t al s,
nurses and members of the medi-
cal staff are performing the func-
tions of a pharmacist. We feel'
even in a small hospital, by super-
vising, the purchasing, dispensing,
labeling and other elements: be-
sides the actual compounding,
could save the hospitals a consid-
erable amount of money.
.A full-time pharmacist would
also release the nursing and medi-
cal staff enabling them to spend
all their time in their specialized
fields."
'uThe survey last year was mainly,
quantitative, gathering data om
that general theories . could be
formulated which this year will,
be tested in actual "workshop"
conditions
For example; Given: A hospi-
tal of 50 beds. Would a profession-
al pharmacist on a full or part
time' basis be economical? or
would' it be better to make an ar-
rangement with a local retail
pharmacist?
Besides the comparative analy-
sis, panel discussions will be held
including both pharmacists and
hospital administrators. Another
objective is to compile a procedur-
al manual for the community
pharmacist in order to help him
in his approach and organization.'

Henry K. Townes, University
entomology research associate,
said efforts to entic.e students into
biological sciences without "laying
the cards on the table" would be
injurious to them.
Biological fields iack profession-.
al prestige and public support as
compared to engineering and oth-
er physical sciences, Townes indi-
cated. However, he added that the
Russian threat might improve the
situation.
Townes suggested that proposals
of glamorizing the field have been
made, and that to carry these out
would be a disservice to prospec-
tive students.
Many Interested
"There are more people inter-
ested' in biological studies than
there are salaries to support
them," he explained.
"Therefore," he continued, "I
don't think we should entice im-
mature students into the biologi-
cal sciences without laying the
P'ottery Exhib it
To Be Given
yKipneshige
Toyo Kaneshige, whose pottery
skill has drawn acclaim from the
Japanese government, will offer a
demonstration of his techniques
at 1:15 p.m. today in the main
foyer of the Architecture building.
Examples of his work will also
be displayed.
Kaneshige's specialty is Bizen
ware, an ancient style of pottery
using unglazed earthen ware fired
at great temperatures. Due to a
high iron content, the finished
pieces are reddish-brown in color.
In recognition of his talents, the
government of Japan has regis-
tered Kaneshige as a "national
treasure," an honor usually ac-
corded such things as great art
works, and very rarely to'a person,
according to Dr. John W. Hall
chairman of the Japanese studies
center.

cards on the table salary-wise.
Let's not try to fool our young-
sters."
"At the same time. if a student
enjoys working in the field," he
noted, "then he should not be dis-
couraged.
IMajor Source .
As to the comparative salary.
lag between biological and physi-
cal sciences, Townes said that in
biological areas, public employ-
ment is the major source of jobs.
"There are relatively few job
openings in industry," he said. Be-
cause of the lack of competition
between private industry, and pub-

lic service, salaries tend to
er than in those areas whe
lie salaries must match
levels, Towne explained-
;"Salaries have been cons
lower and generally have
en into''consideration tb
amount of preparation ne
work in these fields," he
With regard'to future p
the entomologist said that
aehievements have made
more aware of the educatio
we might do. "Their sputn:
awakened people to the fi
progress in science depend
continued effort," he adde

IIILLEL FOUNDATION
Sat., Dece.1 4 .9-12:30 P.]
AUSIC REFRESHMENTS
Members $1 .00 Non-Members $1.50
1429 HILL STREET--

r-
o-

HIGHER EDUCATION FACILITIES - An undergraduate is shown at work in a laboratory in the

Lts

University College of Ghana.,

of the edu-
of the gov-
re was too
higher' edu-
of the low-
rnment has
nds on resi-
there aren't
idary school
n."
rate
n is still in
ion schools,
ent is con-
chooling fa-
Talk

cilities. In many cases, where the
villagers are particularly enthusi-
astic, they have constructed their
own schools from local materials.
Collins said that from 1951 to
1956, the number of students in
primary schools has trebled.
- He continued with statistics,
noting, "About three hundred fif-
ty thousand children attend pri-
mary schools for five or six years,
where they are taught the vernac-
ular, some English, and basic 'tool
subjects.' e'
Number Pared
By the college level this num-
ber is pared to less than one per
cent3' He added that enthusiasms
vary from comnunity to commu-
nity. The rivalry is high between
neighboring villages as to who
will have the better. school, and
this crieates the familiar problem
of duplication. Adjacent schools
are built with ludicrous results-
"Education is directed toward
an Africanization of public life.
This is the ultimate goal of the
government," Collins said, adding
that many of the administrative
and professional positions are still'
held by foreigners. "This is espe-
cially true in the areas of technol-
ogy.
Teaching Encouraged
Teaching is encouraged by the
government and the teacher is one
of the highest paid professionals,
with a commensurate social sta-

fctioni
in of Smith'
"Science and
Fiction" at
in Rackham
was born in
an assistant
and English.
Soviet Rus-
ner of 1956.
Slavic Lan-

tus. "In fact," he added, 'the
leader of the opposition party in
parliament is a professor of ;so-
ciology."
He explained, compared to the
social sciences, technical training
is de-emphasized. This is a result
of the long British tutelage, when
all technology was in British
hands. A new technical college
has been started, with an all Brit-
ish faculty. Commenting further,
he said, "If Ghana is to develop
its resources, and increase its ag-
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLEWIN
(Continued from Page 4),
Interdepartmental Seminar on Ap-
plied Meteorology: Engineering. Mon.,.
Dec. 16, 4 p.m., Room 307, West Engi-
neering Bldg. R. E. Munn will speak
on "Criteria in Site Selection for Nu-
clear Reactors" - Chairman: Prof. Hen-
ry J. omberg. "
Doctoral Examination for William An-
drew Gould, Pharmaceutical Chemistry;
thesis: "The synthesis of 2-Azetidinones
(beta Lactams)," Fri., Dec. 13, 2525
Chemistry Bldg., at 2:00 p.m. Chairman
F. F. Blicke.
Doctoral Examination for Frederick
Gnichtel Hammitt, Nuclear Engineer-
ing; thesis: "Heat and Mass Transfer
in Closed, Vertical, Cylindrical Vessels
With Internal Heat Sources for Homo-
geneous Nuclear Reactors," Fri., Dec.
13, 3201 East Engineering Building, at
2:30 p.m. Chairman, H. A. ohigren.
Placement Notices
The following school systems willbe
at the Bureau of Appointments 'on
Tues., Dec. 17 to interview teachers for
Feb. and-'Sept. 1958.
Detroit, Michigan (Redford Union
Schools)E- lementary (Kindergarten,
2nid grade).
Fraser, Michigan -- Elementary (Kin-
dergarten, 1st grade); Speech .Correc-
tion; Special' Education (mentally re-
tarded).
Lansing, Michigan - For February-
Elementary, (all grades); For Septem-
ber All Fields.
For any additional information and
appointments contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489..

ricultural potential, science and
technology must be popularized."
The writing of the intelligentsia
is mostly of a political nature. The
future direction of the govern-
ment is the essential issue. This
includes such problems as what to
draw on from East and West, and
how to reconcile new influences
with the pattern of age-old tribal
traditions. Collins added, the is-
sues resulting. from political in-
dependence have caught fire
among the increasingly numerous
educated class.
"Education is faced with a tre-
mendous task. Many individuals
are willing to literally starve to
get an education, even if they
have to travel to London.
Forsake Education
Yet paradoxically,. these same
people will often return from an
English education and forsake all
to resume their old tribal patterns.
They will disappear from the out-
side world of foreign influence and
sink into the security of their
tribe. The problem is transition
from old to new, as in any homo-
geneous and traditional *society.
"Alongside the modern new uni-
versity exist primitive customs
which are, to us, murderous and
barbaric," he said.
He concluded that education,
from the primary, level, is the key
to "Africanization", adding that
there is danger in the creation of
an intellectual elite under the
present system.
Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized andaregistered stu-
dent organizations only.)
1959 J-Hop, mass committee meeting.
Dec. 12, 4:00 p.m., 3511 SAB.
* * *
Young Republicans, meeting, Dec. 12.
7:30 p.m., Rm. 3-A, Union. Election of
officers for 1958. Speaker: George Sal-
lade.
** *

Spec al

for student groups.
Also available for
Christmas parties, etc.

*

300 S. THAYER'
On U.M. Campus opposite Hill Auditorium
Air Conditioned

YR's To Meet

Dining Room Parties

The Young Republicans' Club
will meet at 7:30 tonight in Rm.
3A of the Union.
Rep. George Sallade (R-Ann
Arbor) will be the principal speak-
er, according to Frances Coulon,
'59Ed, chairman, and 'Claudia
Teatsorth, '59, treasurer.

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Are Ye}
Trotting forth
In Stout Coat
of Mall to Court
Yon Damsel Fair ?
--And do ye need
Your Trappings Tended?

1~~

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Sorry, We Don't
CLEAN ARMOR!
But if you do need your
Formal Wear Cleaned or Pressed,
look at these advantages:
t DAILY PICK-UP AND DELIVERY
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HUTZEL'S

January Graduation Announcements
available, Dec. 12, 13, 1-5 p.m., SAB.
Kappa Phi, Christmas Dessert, Dec. 12,
7:15 p.m., at the home of Mrs. Merrill
Abbey, 2016 Seneca.
Christian Science Organization, week-
ly testimonial meeting, Dec. 12, '7:30
p.m., Upper Room, Lane Hall.
Study group on Relativistic Quantum
Theory meeting, Dec. 12, 5:00 p.m., 3212
Angell Hall. Professor Rainich to dis-
cuss Maxwell's and Dirac Equations.

t
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SANTA SAYS...
"Make Thiss Christmas"a
ENSIAN Christmas"
Be sure you purchase your '58 Ensian
TODAY AND TOMORROW
between 9 A.M. and 4 P.M.

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