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December 07, 1957 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1957-12-07

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P1r AMOO ttia3atl~
Sixty-Eighth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

Dangerous Gap In Our System

"When Opinions Are Free
Truth Will Prevail"

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions. of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

TURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1957

NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN WEICHER

NIC Resolution
On Membership Discussed

First Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 17 to January 28, 1958
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the-first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with _the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

acv

THE NATIONAL Inter-Fraternity Confer-
ence's recent resolution approving the right
of the fraternities to practice membership' se-
lection certainly deserves a great deal of'
thought and consideration on the part of the
local fraternity system. The three-point state-
ment resolved that the choosing of one's own
friends and associates is "a social right which
cannot be confused with civil rights and, there-
fore, is not subject or amenable to edicts, regu-
lations, laws, and legislative fiats abridging
that social right."
The Conference reinforced its initial state-
ment by saying "each college fraternity is a
social organization, voluntary in membership,
and is entitled to exercise its fundamental
American right to choose members in accord-
ance with its own standards." The annual con-
ference, attended by alumni officers from each
of the member national fraternities, also de-
fined the national fraternity's jurisdiction in
relation to its constituent:chapters. The fra-
ternity's national convention, the statement
continued, establishes the standards to which
the local chapters must conform though it is
true the local chapters send the voting repre-
sentatives to these conventions.
The NIC's purpose in issuing such a resolu-
tion is not readily discernable. It could mean,
in the words of Inter-Fraternity Council Pres-
ident Rob Trost, just a "clarification of the fra-
ternity system's beliefs concerning member-
ship." More important and probably closer to
the real underlying purpose, it could possibly
be the NIC's first step in a mote definite pro-
gram to eliminate, curtail or protest many col-
lege's efforts to combat fraternity bias. Being
the first written statement .of the NIC concern-
ing this issue, it is certainly a startling reso-
lution to approve at a time of concerted efforts
by universities and colleges to eliminate restric-
tive clauses. Few but the seven committee mem-
bers who drafted the resolution knew that it
would be presented before the NIC for a vote.
IF THE NIC should decide to conduct such
a drive, it would be in direct opposition to

the fraternities throughout the country who
are presently, under various pressures, elimin-
ating their discriminatory clauses. In effect,
fraternities have been given written affirma-
tion that their national organizations favor
membership discrimination or selection, what-
ever you wish to call it. No stipulation was
made as to the criteria fraternity men should
use in their choice of individuals.
The NIC was careful not to include the de-
ciding words "on the basis of race, creed, or
color," in their resolution. Mal Cumming, IFC
executive vice-president and observer at the
Conference, admitted that the resolution could,
be interpreted to mean the exclusion of an in-
dividual for these reasons.
It is very doubtful the University will express
any alarm over the resolution. No mention was
made in it that would conflict with the 1949
ruling denying recognition to any group or or-
ganization having a restrictive clause. But, the
resolution is contrary to the University's de-
sire to eliminate discriminatory clauses through
"educational means."
PERHAPS AN interesting fact to consider
would be the delegates who cast the decid-
ing ballots. Alumni national officers of each
fraternity drafted and passed the resolution.
College and university inter-fraternity coun-
cils'sent delegates but they did not have the
opportunity to vote. Yet it is these individuals
and the undergraduate students they repre-
sent with which the resolution is concerned.
Undergraduate fraternities do have the right
to vote for their national representatives but
it is usually left up to the delegates as to how
they will vote on important NIC matters.
But undergraduate fraternities were not in-
formed of the NIC proposal. This was evi-
denced by the fact that undergraduate frater-
nity'members knew nothing about the NIC res-
olution until it was officially announced that
it -had been passed. Perhaps individual local
fraternity houses would show a different view
of the NIC's resolution if given an opportunity
to cast their votes directly.
-BARTON HUTHWAITE

Time of Class
at'
at!
at
MONDAY at :
at
at
at
at

0

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Time of Examination
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 24
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Monday, January 27
Monday, January 27
Saturday, January 18
Tuesday, January 21
Tuesday, January 21
Saturday, January 25
Saturday, January 18
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 24
Saturday, January 25
Thursday, January 23

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TUESDAY

at
at
at
at
at
at
at,

a
1.,

(Herblock Is on Vacation)

Copyright. 1957. The Pulitzer Publishing Co.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

* Classes beginning on the
preceding hour.

half hour will be scheduled at the

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Complacency Irks Congress
By DREW PEARSON

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

TODAY AND TOMORROW:
why Muddle Through?
By WALTER LIPPMANN '

I

THE BRIEFING of the Congressional leaders
at the White House, on Tuesday fore-
shadows, indeed it seems to make-certain, a
great party struggle on the issues of the coun-
try's response to the Soviet challenge. The
Democrats, however divided they may _be on
the problem of segregation, will be very much
united in their criticism of the Eisenhower ad-
ministration for falling behind in the race of
armaments.
They will insist that the Administration was
well informed and clearly warned by its own
intelligence services that the Russians were
forging ahead, that, nevertheless, ihe Adminis-
tration suppressed and ignored these warnings,
and that even after the Sputniks and all, that
they signify, there has been no sense of ur-
gency, no bold and resourceful planning to deal
with the situation.
No -doubt, there will oe substantial majori-
ties in Congress for specific requests for more
money. But there is no prospect at this time
that there will-be the kind of non-partisan
unity in the next Congress which there was,
let us say, after Pearl Harbor. Why -not? The
country finds itself in a very serious situation,
one which, if it is not righted, can have fear-
ful consequences. Why, then, is there no good
prospect that the Congress will close its ranks,
and rally to the President's standard?
THE ANSWER, I am afraid, is that the Presi-
- dent has raised no standard to which the
country can rally. After Pearl Harbor, it was
clear to everyone that the country must unite
in order to win the war which had so nearly
been lost, and that this meant raising and
equipping great military forces. But as to Sput-
nik, there is no such clarity about our objec-
tives and our duty.
For, as the scientists have been telling us,
we have fallen behind in the race of armaments
bedause we have fallen behind in our technolo-
gical capacity as it relates to the instruments
of power. This is a default that cannot be cor-
o~1w ici40gan ai1y
Editorial. Staff
PETER ECKSTEIN. Editor
JAMES ELSMAN, JR. VERNON NAHRGANG
Editorial Director City Editor
DONNA HANSON................. Personnel Director
TAMMY MORRISON................Magazine Editor
EDWARD GERULDSEN .. Associate Editorial Director
WILLIAM HANEY ..... .... Features Editor
ROSE PERLBERG...................Activities Editor
CAROL PRINS........ Associate Personnel Director
JAMES BAAD ..........,............... Sports Editor
BRUCE BENNETT............Associate Sports Editor
JOHN HILLYER............ Associate Sports Editor
CHARLES CUTISS------- . _hiefP Phora'nhe

rected quickly. Moreover, though it cannot be
corrected without the expenditure of much
more money and much more effort, no one
inside or outside the Administration is as yet
able to define adequately a concrete program.
A concrete program equal to the emergency
in which we live can be worked out only after
the real situation is known and realized by the
-country, and then only after there has been a
searching public debate. We shall know what
to do only as and when we have explored the
causes of our great default and have discussed
the many remedies which are proposed. This is
a time when our salvation is most likely to lie
not in trying to ignore the two party system,
but in looking to it - its leaders being respon-
sible men -- as the only effective means by
which the real situation can be brought home
to the people, and the critical issues thorough-
ly discussed.
This is a time in our history when a loyal
opposition is an indispensible organ of good
government.
Why, one may ask, is it a time when the role
of the opposition is so big and so important?
The answer is that the Administration cannot
be counted upon to furnish the leadership
which* our situation demands. There are two
reasons for this. The one is that the great de-
fault took place because they ignored their own
intelligence. Human nature being what it is,
it is easier to acknowledge the real situation
under the pressure of an opposition than it is
to confess it voluntarily. The second reason is
that the President is in no condition to exert
the enormous energies which the situation calls
for, and to endure the fearful strains of carry-
ing out great programs.
LET US REMEMBER the situation in which
we find ourselves. We have lost, or we are
almost certain to lose in the near future, that
command of the air on which our world posi-
tion has rested. For many reasons, which seens
to me good reasons, I do not think this means
that we shall be attacked and devastated. But
I believe it does mean that until and unless we
are able to right the balance of power which is
now against us, our influence will decline, our
alliances will become enfeebled, our positions
abroad will tend to disintegrate.
The men among us who will know how to
deal with this grim probability are those who
know, not herely say but know in their bones,
that there is no cheap and easy way out.
1957 New York Herald Tribune Inc.
New Books at the Library
Cagle, Malcolm W.-The Sea War in Korea;
Annapolis, U.S. Naval Institute, 1957.
Costain. Thomas B.-Below the Salt: N.Y..

WASHINGTON - As they left
the White House, congression-
al leaders made no secret of their
dissatisfaction 'with Eisenhower
Administration complacency to-
ward Russia's missile-satellite vic-
tories. However, they kept secret
the reasons why they felt the
President and his Cabinet were
not doing enough about the
danger.
This column is now able to re-
port the highlights of the dis-
cussion which led to their alarm:
Secretary of State Dulles was
the first to touch off congression-
al concern by giving a complacent,
unworried account of Russian
progress. Dulles sounded as if he
considered the United States
ahead of Russia. He completely
disregarded Russian Weapons,
talked about political systems and
religious strengths instead.
"Because of our own great spir-
itual strength," he told the skepti-
cal solons, "we will triumph in
the end."
* * *
"THERE IS no reason to think
the Russians are irresistible," said
the Secretary of State. "Their
great weakness is denial of free-
dom to theindividual. This has
brought about an unbalanced,
warped - society. The struggle for
power that we recently witnessed
Inside the Kremlin is a sign of
this weakness. They have aban-
doned their five-year 'plan, a sign
of their inability to supply their
own people with consumer goods.
"All the escapees who come out
of Russia," continued Mr. Dulles,
"give us proof that the system is
not satisfying the people."

Dulles went on to emphasize
Russian weakness as shown by the
ousting of Marshal Zhukov. He
also emphasized the strength of
the American industrial machine
compared to Russia's.
"We are turning out six million
automobiles a year," Dulles said.
"Russia is making only 100,000.
This was too much for Arkan-
sas' Sen. William Fulbright, potent
member of the Foreign Relations
Committee.
"Mr. Secretary," he said, "unless
you come up here with some sense
of urgency, you can never get your
program through Congress.
"You cite the fact that Marshal
Zhukov has been fired as a sign
of Russian weakness. On the con-
trary, that means they are so con-
fident of their position they don't
hesitate to fire their top military
man.
"You point out that Russia
makes only 100,000 automobiles
while we make six million," con-
tinued the Senator from Arkansas,
who is a Rhodes Scholar and
former president of the University
of Arkansas. "Maybe they don't
need six million automobiles a year
in Russia.
"Maybe they are better off with
only 100,000 automobiles a year.
Maybe our children would be bet-
ter off with less automobiles, and
studying jn school the way the
Russian children are studying."
* * *
The President opened up the
briefing with a little speech in
which he said he wanted to be
present because he considered it
important.

As he walked into the meeting,
he seemed genuinely pleased by a
burst of spontaneous applause
from his bipartisan guests who
had not seen him since his cere-
bral attack.
"My doctor tells me I'm okay
and I feel all right," he remarked.
"But I hope you will not mind if
I do not do too much talking to-
day. I find I still have a little dif-
ficulty when I try to talk at any
length.
After attending , for about an
hour and a half, the President got
up and excused himself.
,~ * .* *
LATER, he did come back as
Secretary of Defense Neil McEl-
roy took up the defense budget.
At this point the missile-satellite
lag came in for some of the rough-
est cross-examination of all, to be
described in an early column.
Note 1 - Adlai. Stevenson re-
mained silent during the half-day
session. At the close, Eisenhower
asked whether Stevenson had any
comments. He replied with a brief
statement, the essence of which
was that he had nothing to say.
Eisenhower was extremely courte-
ous toward him throughout the
meeting.
Note 2 - Congressional leaders
missed their lunch. At one point,
they were asked whether they
wanted to go down to the White
House basement, for a cafeteria
lunch, but Speaker Sam Rayburn
said he wanted to finish up the,
briefing "today" and leave town,
so the meeting went through un-
til 2 p.m. without a break.
(Copyright 1957 by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

Botany 2
Chemistry 3, 5E, 15, 182
Economics 71, 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, .153
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31, 32
Geology 11
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 35
Physics 53
Psychology 190
Russian 1, 31
Sociology 1, 4, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
401S

Monday, January 20
Monday, January 27
Thursday, January 23
Saturday, January 25
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 28
Wednesday, January 22

Thursday, January 23 '7-10 p.m.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bus. Ad. 11, 12 Thursday; January 23 2-5

COLLEGE+
Ch.-Met. 1, Lee B and D
Ch.-Met. 11
C. E. 21, 151
C. E. 22
C. E. 133, 141
Drawing 1, 33
Drawing 2, 21
Drawing 11
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
English 11
I. E. 100, 120
M. E. 2
M. E. 132
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
401S

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OF ENGINEERING
Tuesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 28
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 21
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 28
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Friday, January 17
Friday, January 17
Thursday, January 23
Wednesday, January 22

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'V
"I
/

F

l

Thursday, January 23 7-10 p.m.

FACES DISCRIMINATION:

A'

Problems of American Indians

By MARGARET SCHULTZ
Daily Staff Writer
T HE AMERICAN INDIAN is
quickly vanishing into the con-
formities and conventionalities
which are the hallmarks of our
modern society.
This tendency to merge and mix
with the "white man," as he still
prefers to call us, is not an entirely
new trend. Five years ago the Bu-
reau of Indian Affairs initiated its
relocation program, which works
to resettle the Indian in 12 differ-
ent areas throughout the country.
Also, in the last decade our govern-
ment has begun to grant to the
Indian certain rights which he had
previously been denied.
Today he is able to throw off his
status as a ward of the government
at any time by merely giving up
his tribal membership. Few do,
however, for wardship serves the
Indian as a protective shield
against our white-dominated so-
ciety.
* * *
THERE ARE many Indians who
prefer wardship, for with it comes
a grant of land exempt from taxa-
tion. Though most Indians are
satisfied with this arrangement,
rime a raocentful nf the restric.-

cials. Such feelings of the Indian
concerning the Bureau of Indian
Affairs are easily understoood, and
one can appreciate his complaints
of government paternalism. Thus,
in many cases he wishes to retain
wardship, but cannot understand
why such status should also carry
with it curtailment of his freedoms.
Yet, even overlooking. federal
supervision of Indian financial af-
fairs, there are other grievances
the Indian holds against our gov-
ernment.
His latest concern isthe actions
of the government and some state-
sponsored groups in encouraging
the sale of Indian land, to non-
whites. Also, there are several local
and private groups which are try-
ing to buy his rich oil finds from
him.
Land to the Indian has always
meant a great deal, and for many
it is about the only material bless-
ing they possess.
* * *
OFTEN the group that is apply-
ing pressure upon the Indian to
sell is one that openly practices
discrimination against him. Sev-
eral political pressure groups have
aligned themselves against the In-
dian ond have hn enessful in

tainly contrary to the idea of free
enterprise.
The Indian also sees a, major
fault in the relocation program. If
for some reason he is unable to
make the adjustment in the city,
he has not financial guarantee for
returning to the reservation, The
government gives him a one-way
trip. About 25 per cent of those
resettled are unable to make the
adjustment. _
Then there are feelings of bitter-
ness against the government be-
cause of discriminatory clauses in
various state constitutions. In five
an Indian may not marry a white.
In several states he is still denied
water rights.
Not spelled out in so many let-
ters, but just as real to the In-
dian are the numerous discrimina-
tory practices that one finds in
some southwestern states. In many
places he finds the same problem
as does the Mexican - a double
standard in the wage scale. The
white often uses the cheap Indian
labor market to his own advan-
tage.
* * *
AS THE FIRST American citizen
looks toward the future, he won-

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND, THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W. E. between December 10
and 20 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit In any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
LDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINl

I

A

I

The Daily Official Bunetm is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing,before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.

cashier's representatives are present. The
fee for injection is $1.00.
TIAA - College Retirement Equities
Fund. Participants ifs the Teachers
Insurance and Annuity Association re-
tirement program who wish to change
their contributions to the College Re-
tirement Equities Fund, or to apply for
or discontinue participation in the

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