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September 16, 1957 - Image 51

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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-jz" . . -C

ige 10-The Michigan Daily Magazine

Monda

lM MMn.

ON UNIVERSAL PROBLEMS:
Writer Paul Darcy Boles
(Continued from Page 8) r r

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understanding is enough a part
of Carp Rambo, that, if he has no
control over his destiny, he is able
to act positively within its limi-
tations and likewise do his share
to help people in his life come to
grips with their lots.
BOLES writes sensually; it is a
visually rich prose, and the
author needs few words to evoke
a scene and make its moments
meaningful. It is a style that fits
in effectively with the versatile
technique he employs.
The first book was a third-per-
son narrative, while Carp Rambo's
story is told as Carp himself would
have told it. Boles infuses Carp's
narrative with the lore of our
southern United States.
"Glenport, Illinois" is the most
ambitious of the four novels, in
terms of the book's physical scope.
The author traces a boy's growth
to manhood, but does so through
the use of a different narrative
technique.
We see Tone Grayleaf first,
through the eyes of his father,
because the boy is too young to
grasp the sensations of their mi-
gration to Glenport, and the new-
ness is almost the same for the
older man. Then, as the boy
grows,wensee the world through
his eyes; but as his being effects
others, we see him as his friends
observe him.
We see him as would the mother
of his best friend; when he is
older, his wife's eyes, those of
someone come to Glenport from;
outside, are the focal points. It is
a more controlled technique than
the regular omniscient approach
and, in Boles' hands, it is used
most effectively.,
My only objection is a personal
one, that any omniscient view-
point forfeits a sense of individual
experience that a more unified
technique offers.
ELSEWHERE in his essay, the;
author contends writing is "at
one and the same time a personal
and a universal experience." This
can be read two ways.
It could be merely that the wri-4
NOrmi3P491
C- AR 0 G

A Look at the City
"'We Now Take You to Beautiful Ann Arbor
-Strap on Your Safety Belt!"

CARS, CARS, CARS-"In no other town in the country can you see so many dirty LincoIns and dirty Cadillacs, 1957 model. Everywhere
Lincoln treats it as a sort of family altar, keeping it washed, keeping it waxed and polished, and keeping the white-sidewall

JACKET DESIGN FROM 'DEADLINE'
.. , the editor must take a stand on segregation

r ' rr r rrr

The /fet 7oietwi
and epeqfj are a'ai/a6Ie

at poijcAep . . «

ter works alone, but that he
shares the fruits of that labor
with the world. The other mean-
ing is more in keeping with Mr.
Boles' creed: that the subject
matter is, at first, personal, but
eventually the writer must articu-
late about his involvement in the
world, of his obligation and his
glory as a man.
He tackles such a universal
problem in his fourth book.
"Deadline" is about the editor of
a southern newspaper who must
make his decision, as to his per-
sonal stand on the segregation is-
sue.
More than anything else, how-
ever, this book shows the author's
concern for man's involvement
with his fellow man, this time on
a much larger scale.
Where Tagli was mostly iso-
lated, and Carp Rambo's involve-
ments were solely persoral; and
Tone Grayleaf, except in his pri-
vate life, was not crucially in-
volved in society; George Case,
the hero of "Deadline," is respon-
sible to his world for many things.
THE STORY encompasses sever-
al days in George Case's life.
He has not taken a stand on seg-

regation, although the Supreme
Court decision had a 1r e a d y
aroused the South.
In a few days, the publishers
would be back from Chicago
where they have received orders
from their board of directors, a
group of men too far away from
the crisis to fully understand. He
must seek out people who can
help him understand, such as his
friend Louis, a successful free-
lance writer, and the poet Garon
Loring.
A drinking bout with Louis puts
George in contact with more peo-
ple who are interested in his de-
cision, while a visit to Garon's
farm, confronts him with the
poet's personal difficulties which
likewise serve to guide his deci-
sion.
No one can call Paul Darcy
Boles a literary figure; however,
that frees him from the harbin-
gers of notoriety. He need never
have his picture taken in the lap
of a movie star, nor assume any
other ridiculous pose. .
He is merely a good writer who,
with each book, makes a more vi-
tal contribution to his field. In
time, he will get the belated rec-
ognition he deserves.
m-MMMMMU

Treatments and Hair Preparations

Choose fro o

By MALCOLM COWLEY
ANN ARBOR, Mich., is a city of
sixty thousand people with
beautiful elm - shaded streets
through which automobiles go rac-
ing bumper to bumper and fender
to crumpled fender. The name
commemorates a wild-grape arbor
on the banks of the Huron River,
much loved by early settlers,
which is now the site of the city
dump.
The Motor Metropolis is only
forty miles away, and executives
of Ford and General Motors now
come to Ann Arbor to live in the
purer air, perfumed with lilacs,
roses, and ethyl gasoline. There
is also a university that is large
even by Midwestern standards.
For eight and a half months of
the year, excluding weekends,
there are as. many students in Ann
Arbor as there are people of all
ages in Danbury. Many of the
graduate'students are married,
and they have more children than
attend the Brookfield school.
There is a Faculty Directory that
also includes administrative per-
sonnel. It has six thousand names
in it, about equal to the 1950 pop-
ulation of New Milford. The stu-
dents have - cars, the professors
have cars, and the motor execu-
tives have three or four cars per
fol' each of their half-grown chil-
family, including Thunderbirds
dren.
Cars are relatively cheap in
Michigan, 'where almost every-
thing else is dear. Gas costs as
Malcolm Co ley, famed
American literary critic, wrote
"We Now Take You to Beau-
tiful Ann Arbor - Strap on j
Your Safety Belt!" for a home-
town publication, The Senti-
nel, during his stay at the Uni-
versity last year as a visiting
professor of English. He has
graciously given The Daily the
Privilege of reprinting his im -
pressions of Ann Arbor.!

much as it does in Wyoming, gro-
ceries are high, liquor is taxed, re-
taxed, and taxed again, and rents
are roughly equivalent to those in
Fairbanks, Alaska; but cars are
practically given away for green
trading stamps. Well, let's be ac-
curate. The list price of new cars
is about $75 less than it is in Con-
necticut, but dealers are prepared
to shade the price if buyers seem
reluctant. Used cars can be bought
on Livernois Avenue in Detroit for
$5 down and $5 a week. Even fam-
ilies living on relief or old-age
pensions wouldn't think of doing
without a car.
WHILE looking for a place to
park in downtown Ann Arbor,
I made some observations on the
motor-car situation, or plight.
There was plenty of time to make
them because my favorite park-
ing lot was being graded and it
took me an hour to find another
with a vacant place. Here are a
few notes that I thought might
interest readers of the Sentinel.
In no other town in the coun-
try can you see so many dirty
Lincolns and dirty Cadillacs, 1957
model. Everywhere else the owner
of a Cadillac or Lincoln treats it
as a sort of family altar, keeping
it washed, keeping it waxed and
polished, and keeping the white-
sidewall tires as clean as his cus-
tom-made shirt. Here the 1957
Lincolns (mostly flesh-colored or
shocking pink) and the 1957 Cad-
illacs (mostly bright yellow con-
vertibles) are covered with grease
and mud or dust, depending on
the season. The explanation seems
to be that they are owned by mo-
tor-company executives who ex-
pect to trade them in, come Octo-
ber, for 1958 models, and mean-
while treat them like jalopies. In-
cidentally the children take bet-
ter care of their all-white or all-
black Thunderbirds.
In no other state'in the Union
are there so many cars with
rusted-out fenders, frayed at the
bottom like old overalls. A pro-
bable explanation is that Michi-
gan has lots of wet snow and uses

lots of salt on the highways to get
rid of it. Michigan cars that are
more than four years old look like
Spanish dowagers trailing the
ends of a lace mantilla as they
pick their painful way to a grave-
yard.
WHAT kind of cars do faculty
members drive? I made my ob-
servations in the university park-
ing lots as I drove around vainly
trying to get into them. The ad-
ministrative staff of the univer-
sity - as distinguished from pro-
fessors -- drives shiny new cars,
mostly station wagons or four-
door sedans in the medium
chrome range. But the professors
drive relics of the flush days after
World War II - Kaisers, Henry
J's, Willys Aero Larks, one-
breasted Studebakers, or, if they
feel dashingly modern, 1953 sen-
sible Plymouths, the model that
didn't sell because it was lacking
in steatopygia - I mean the pos-
terior overhapg that is regarded

terior overhapg that is regarded sometimes on bright Sunday aft-

as a mark of beauty among Hot-
tentot women and American mo-
tor cars. There are also a good
many Volkswagens (black) and a
few Renaults, purchased by pro-
fessors who have given Fulbright
Lectures in Europe and came
home carrying a briefcase in one
hand and a sort of motorized xel-
ocipede in the other.
As for the students, they drive
either truly ancient jalopies or
else gleamin gnew Mercurys and
Buicks that put the professors to
shame. And how they do drive, on
these narrow streets and roads!
The Michigan speed limit is 65
miles per hour, but nobody pays
much attention to it. When a car
stops suddenly for a red light,
the car behind bumps into it, and
sometimes the two cars behind
that one, with a noise like suc-
cessive thunderclaps.
A busy road runs a hundred
yards from our back window, and
sometimes on bright Sunday aft-

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