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September 16, 1957 - Image 50

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Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16
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age 2-The Michigan Daily Magazine

The Michigan Daily Magazine

Monday, Sept
BILLY GRAHAM, CRUSADE
No Fire and Brimstone, Just Sincerity and Publicity

Vol. IV, No. I

Monday, September 16, 1957

CONTENTS

Day School Opens September 24
Night School September 25
Professional training for businesspositions, at a saving of time and
money. Choose one of these practical courses.

A LOOKAT-THEClTY.................. By Malcolm Cowley
MEYER LEVIN'S "COMPULSION" ........ By Tammy Morrison
THOSE BOOMING MOTELS ................ By Michael Kraft
BUS TERMINAL BLUES................... By Michael Kraft
CUBA'S YOUNG INTELLECTUALS ......... By David A. Munro
PAUL DARCY BOLES .....................By Burton Beerman
ART SCHOOL'S McCLURE ............ By Lane Vanderslice
BILLY GRAHAM, CRUSADER ................By Richard Taub
DORMS WILL BE DORMS ....................By David KesseI

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Secretarial
Accounting
Stenographic
Bookkeeping

Speedwriting
Stenograph
Business Machines

FREE PLACEMENT SERVICE. We are receiving many position offers
for each graduate.
AN OFFICE POSITION offers- a good salary, opportunities for advance-
ment, regular hours, paid vacations, and pleasant surroundings.
EARLY REGISTRATION is advisable, especially if you are interested in
part-time work or a choice of rooming places.
PRE-MILITARY OFFICE TRAINING'for young men who are subject to
military service.
Ask for FREE LITERATURE
LEARN MORE about the opportunities which await you, and how you
can save time by preparing here for a job with a future, Phone, visit our
office, or mail a card today.
Hamilton Business College
Founded 1915 State and William Sts. Ph. NO 8-7831

TAMMY MORRISON, Magazine Editor
RICHARD BLOSS, Magazine Photographer
PHOTO CREDITS-Unless specified, photos are Daily Photos by Richard Bloss. Page 5: Photos
Courtesy The Michigan Architect and Engineer. Page 6: Daily Photos by Sam Ching. Page
7: Photos Courtesy the author, David A. Munro. Page 8: Photo by Bill Diehl, Jr. Page 9:
Daily Photo by Norm Jacobs. Page .10: Photo Courtesy the Macmillan Co.
WANTED!
1000 HEADS
be they square, flat or rounded
far that crew-cut
1 at
The Dascola Barbers
715 P k ( ) pe E i Near Michigan Theatre

I

u

i

THE MUS C CENTI
Just West of Hill Auditorium
is the only placein town where ,
ALL the following.
1. RECORDS - Classical - Popular - Jazz - Folk.
2 Separate Departments - Tremendous Stocks - E
You Choose - Booths for Listening.
2. HI FI RECORD PLAYERS - Pilot, Magnavox, Colur
3. HI FI COMPONENTS - Fisher, Pilot, Scott, ManyI
Prices.
4. TELEVISION - Magnavox, RCA, Philco.
5. RADIOS - Magnavox, RCA, Zenith, Telefunken, &
6. DIAMOND NEEDLES,'$9.95 up -- SAPPHIRES, $
Most Complete Stock in Town - Installed Free).
7. TAPE RECORDERS - Stereo & Conventional - For(
tic - All Prices.
8. MODERN SERVICE DEPARTMENT for Television-
9. PARTS for Radio & Television.
10. EXPERIENCED Sales Personnel in All Departments.
You are always welcome at
3THEtT SIC ENTI
300 South Thayer St. -Just West of H

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you can get

By RICHARD TAUB -
Daily Staff Writer
LLY Graham! That name in-
spires for many a vision of one
of those renowned fire and brim-
stone evangelists of another day,
one of those legendary men of the
soap-box who were able to work
themselves and their audiences
into a frenzy, and by so doing ac-
complish the work they set out to.
Graham, however, doesn't fit
into this picture at al.
Certainly he gesticulates amply.
At times while he was in New
York's Madison Square Garden,
he almost-shouted. His voice was
forceful, on the excited side of
rhetorical, ..but never frenzied.
There were never uncontrolled
-shouts to heaven.
Instead he delivers with a voice.
moderated by deep sincerity, a
force carefully controlled.
And yet Billy Graham - this
is no news - is successful. Madi-
son Square Garden was packed for
his appearance, fuller than it has
been for the Rangers in a hockey
game or the Knicks in a basket-
ball contest, fuller than it has
been in recent years for Ringling
Brothers, Barnum and Bailey Cir-
cus.
Every seat in the house was
taken and people were standing,
too! If-Graham used mob psychol-
ogy, as many critics of evangelists
maintain, it is of a rare and subtle
kind.
HE WAS effective. That night
about 1500 people decided, at
least tentatively, to make the "De-
cision for Christ." They came
from everywhere in the Garden-
from the ground floor to the third
balcony.
Young and old, crippled and
strong, white and colored and or-
iental, poor, middle class and ap-
parently wealthy walked across
the floor of the hall to the edge
of Billy Graham's pulpit. And
they made the walk despite the
20,000 pairs of eyes aimed curious-
ly at them.
For many of the people Graham
was a special hero. They had come
to his services night after night,
again and again, and wanted still
more. When Graham spoke, Tne
Garden was still. Twenty-two
thousand people were silent.
And they listened hard for ea'-
ery word and were eager to re-
spond whenever possible. Excited
"aughter greeted his feeblest joke
(which was rathc: feeble.)
At the beginning of the pro-
gram he commented that some
woman had written in praising
George Beverly Shea (he sings
hymns for the group) and sug-
gested that he should sing with
the Metropolitan. I
The crowd eagerly applauded.
"And he does do a fine job," Gra-
ham said. And the crowd ap-
plauded. "And so does our pian-
ist," Graham said. And again the
crowd eagerly applauded. "And
our organist," Graham said. And
this time there were even a few
rather guarded whistles.
GRAHAM talked down to his
audience. "How many of~ you
people have been here before?"
A great many hands raised,
"There's a Baptist convention in
New York. Howsmany of you
people are Baptists? Raise your
hands." A great many hands went
up. "There certainly are a lot of
Baptists here tonight. How many
of you people are something else?"
A great deal of excited laughter
and more hands.
He sounded -ike somebody ad-
dressing a Sunday school class -
lower grades.
"Do you folks know what's go-
ing to happen later this month?"
(silence) "That's right. We're
holding our closing rally at Yan-
what? Some people don't believe
kee Stadium. And do you know

that New York with all of its
people can fill Yankee Stadium
for a religious program. But we
think it can. I want all of you to
be there for that closing service
and tell your friends and relatives

AFTnER THE choir of more than
a thousand people, all volun-
teers, sang a hymn led by Shea,J
Graham began to preach.
.The world is wicked," he said.
Just read a newspaper and you
can see the world is rotten. It has
always been rotten, because man3
is naturally sinful.j
H " figures were simple ones.
The soul was like air. Christ
was for us as sap is to the petals
of a flower. The sap brings life to
the flower, and Christ brings new
life .to our soul. Environmental
change can't solve our problems.
"My watch is running slow. If I
take it off this arm and put it on
my other arm, will it start run-
ning right?" No, it will not. It's
the inside, the workings that are
all wrong, and it's the same thing
with the soul. Axid the oaiy way
the soul can be cured is through
the Lord Jesus.
His vocabulary was limited.
Then he asked the people to
come down, to stand befors hiis
pulpit if they wished to make- the
"Decision for Christ." He empha-
sized that it wouldn't be he who
was making them come down, but
rather the Lord. It was the Lord
talking in their ears.
He admitted that for some it
would be a long walk, but "He
walked a mighty long way for
you."
THERE would be other battles
ahead. The neighbors might
talk, it might affect somebody
businesswise, and relatives might
exert pressure. This walk was
nothing by comparison. But the
people who decided for Christ
should get used to sacrifice.
The 1000-voice choir began to
sing quietly and slightly off key,
as Billy gently exhorted people to
come down. "I know you're fight-
ing with yourselfes right now," he
said softly, "But you'll decide
right. Some people have even
walked outthe door and decided
to come back."
And then the people started to
come. At first only a trickle - one
from the back, two from the right,
then five or six from the back.
And that trickle became a flood
as people endlessly poured from
the doors and stood with heads
bowed at the pulpit.
A GREAT many of these people
weren't converts at all. Many
came down already carrying Bi-
bles and hymnbooks in their arms.
Some had crosses- about their
necks. Some came from the group
attending the Baptist convention.
These people apparently felt like
Nicodemus; they had never really
been reborn to the Lord Jesus.

Herein lies part of the secret to
Graham's success. Many of the
people who "make the decision for
Christ"are church goers, and may
even have considered themselves
religious.
But Graham is able to paint
graphic pictures of how good it
feels and what it's like to receive
Christ into one's heart.

JUDGING by the crowd who
made the decision, his picture
of contentment, of surrender of
the soul to the Lord Jesus Christ,
appeals not to just a few isolated
individuals or special cases.
No, Billy Graham doesn't ap-
pear to be a fire and brimstone

1

evani
only
Bu
pears
ana
andt
simpl
satisf
ham
his v+

WELCOM 'E

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r i

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