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November 14, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

/ THE MCWIGAN DAILY

Confident of Future-Dorr

ing enrollments, 2) Increasing
:e costs and 3) 'Educational values
:e and objectives.;
1- Increasing Costs
al Commenting on the increased
costs of education, Dorr said it has
A. been dramatized "by the benign
a, attitude of the state legislature."
Dorr said that he can well ap-
preciate the hardships incurred
by the students in financing their
education as he is the chairman
of the committee on University
fees.
. The problem of re-evaluating
our educational values and objec-
tives has led to "long and violent
controversies" concerning high
school curriculums, Dean Dorr
said.
He continued by saying that the
major point of contention has been
the "lack of emphasis on mathe-
matics and the sciences."
Turining to the problem of in-
creasing enrollments, Dean Dorr
cited statistical evidence to illus-
trate his point that "if the Uni-
versity continues to carry its share
of the educational burden in Mich-
igan, it will have an enrollment of
between 40,000 or 50,000 students.
Enrollment Preparations
And I am certain we will con-
tinue to carry our share even in
- light of the recent suggestions to
limit enrollments."
d Recalling preparations being
r taken on campus to meet the re-
e quirements of increased enroll-
n ment, Dean Dorr pointed to the
e new Undergraduate Library, Mary
- Markley Dormitory, the rehabili-

tation of space and facilities, the
Frieze Building and the constant
study of the curricula.'
Dean Dorr expressed the opinion
that the University cannot meet
its educational objectives if it is
to remain entirely in Ann Arbor.
Examples Cited
He referred to a speech made
about five years ago by President
Harlan Hatcher in which he ex-
pressed the idea that the Univer-
sity was an organization which
permeated the entirety of Michi-
gan and only its head was in Ann
Arbor.
Examples of the .University's ex-
pansion cited by Dean Dorr were
the new Flint College and Dear-
born Center.> These educational
milestones .are, according to Dean
Dorr, a continuation of the "idea
of decentralized seat of learning
which was fostered through the
extension service."
CafllTryouts,
For Speech
The Senior Board announced at
its last meeting that tryouts for
the - February, '58, class speaker
will be held Dec. 2-6.
Persons who are interested in
representing the Graduating Class
as a speaker should send a note or
letter to the Senior office; the
speaker must be a member''of the
February class.

New Bureau
To Provide
Programs
By LANE VANDERSLICE,
Providing all of Michigan and
part of Ohio with University stu-
dent speakers and talent is the
new goal of the Stadent Speakers
Bureau.
According to Barry Shapiro, '59,
in charge of the Union's part of
the program, its purpose will be to
provide University speakers and
talent to any high school, alumni
group, or other organization that
requests the service.
The Union' is working in con-
junction with the University pub-
lic relations department.
Information Sent Out
Letters are being sent out now
to all the high schools in Michigan
explaining the service and giving
the high schools an opportunity
to request the service.
"The service is planned primari-
ly for next semester because most
high schools have already set their
assembly programs for this se-
mester," Shapiro said.
He emphasized that any re-
quests received for this semester
will be filled.
Need More Students
The expansion of the bureau
means that more students will be
needed to fill the engagements.
Shapiro urged that any student
interested in speaking or perform-
ing may come from 2 to 5 p.m.
any weekday and sign up in the
Union student offices.
"We feel that the main advan-
tage, to University students is the'
experience that can be gained."
He pointed out that the University
provides all transportation; and
that students' signed up for the
program need not accept speak-
ing engagements if it is inconven-
tent for them to do so.
An average program prepared
for a high school includes two or
three speakers discussing aspects
of college life and one or two en-
tertainers.
According to Shapiro, 15 to 20
students also will take- a week's
bus trip through the:'Upper Pen-
insula, speaking to various schools
and clubs.

TOMORROW NIGHT:
Serkin Featured at Hill
In Extra Concert Series

(4

Scalpred!
Two 'Colgate University stu-
dents who had their heads
shaved in Syracuse Sunday
night had their revenge when
they scalped a Syracuse Uni-
versity marching band member
in Hamilton Monday night, ac-
cording to the Syracuse Daily
Orange.
The two, who were Phi Delta
Thetas at Colgate, had been
kidnapped by the members of
rival fraternities. ,

Rudolph Serkin, pianist, will
present the third concert of the
Extra Concert Series at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
Included in his program will be
"Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue"
by Bach, "Sonata in D Major,
K.311" by Mozart, "Sonata in F
Major, Opus 57" by Beethoven,

Esia
Start

Festival in Washington. He made'
his public debut when Toscanini
invited him to be his soloist with
the New York Philharmonic Sym-
phony Orchestra.
In summers Serkin teaches at
the Marlboro School of Music in
Vermont. Since 1950 he has joined
cellist Pablo Casals for the yearly
Casals Festivals in the French
Pyrenees.
Serkin was brought up in Vien-
na where he studied piano with
Prof. Richard Robert and Arnold
Schoenberg. He made his debut
at the age of 12 with with the.Vi-
enna Symphony, but his concert
career did not start until his mid-
teens.
T2,V Talk Set
On Marxism
A re-evaluation of the place Of
Marxian thinking in modern so-
ciety will be offered on "d~enies,"
a special series of the University's
"Television Hour" at 10 a.m. Sun-
day over WWJ-TV, Detroit.
Prof. James Meisel of the politi-
cal science department, Prof. Alan
Seager of the English department,
and Prof. Morris Janowitz of the
sociology department will discuss
Karl'Marx, the German journalist
and political thinker.
SOn "Mansions of Man,"the sec-
ond half hour, will be a visit to
the great Gothic cathedrals at
Chartres and Amiens.

Ensians will be on sal
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
diagonal or at the engi
arch. Price during this ea
will be $6, according to Dor
son, '60, Promotion manage
All seniors are requester
turn their senior picture p
the photographer as soon
sible, according to Harriso:

:Gilbert & Sullivan Society's
"Trial By Jury" & "The Sorcer

TI(KETS ON SALE!I

$1.00 Nov. 21
$1.30 Nov. 22, 23

Adm.

GI"A AN
LOLLOBR IGIDA .Qt
Ends
rON IG HT. T A
IF NO R .D
V * .

RUDOLF SERKIN,
. to appear here

and "Variations and Fugue. on a
Theme of Handel, Opus 24" by
Brahms.
A native of Eger, Bohemia, Ser-
kin's first visit to the United
States was to play for a specially
invited audience at the Coolidge

0 Starts FRIDAY!

LE GE ROUNDUP

Betrayal That Ticks Like A Time Bomb
- THEN EXPLODES IN YOUR FACE)!

of hearings with the department
e heads.
This year the department heads
started budget planning by submit-
ting detailed information about
previous expenses and future plans.
The planning added up to four
thick notebooks.
The president then met with all
deans and heads of non-academic
departments. After two weeks of
hearings, filling every hour of the

day, the president made general
decisions about budget policy.
After these "policy assumptions"
were approved by the Board of
Regents, university budget officials
cut back the requests described in
the four' notebooks. After more
calculations to accurately estimate'
the university income, an $18,261,-
792 budget was submitted to the
governor. The budget included ap-
propriation requests for both the
Boulder and Denver campuses.

TON IGHT -8:30 P.M.
Pre-Broadway Engagement

'RPiiARDliDIHA.EMuM.z

V"

1,

or

se students
most able
paper sup-
y and ad-
t plan for
I graduates
ato college

u4i4S £erlkfi
PIANIST
Friday, November 15, at 8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM

:Y
y}
: }"
i1!
f }
h'{
" .
Wfi
: :$"
$ :
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: :

NOW!

DI
NO 8

y would
given to
oor stu-
oyer the
is not a

LOREN-DESTCA
CINEMASCOPE V
. .added enjoyment. .
ALL THE EXCITEMENT, COLOR AND GLAMOUR C
SCOTLAND'S CAPITAL DURING THE GALA
" FEST/yAL IN EDINBURGH"

PROGRAM

* * * -
new philosophy of budget
dng lay behind~ a University
lorado request for appropri-
from the state lekislature
tly.
vously the university presi-
nd other administrative offi-
estimated the amount to be
sted for each department.
a spring operation budget
lrawn up, after the legislature
cted on the university's re-
The budget was the result
Organization
Notices
e of this column for announce-
s of meetings is available to of-
y recognized and registered stu-
organizations oniy.)
CP, Executive Board meeting,
4, 8:00 p.m., SA$.
- - *
igan Forensic Forum, meeting,
4, 7:30, Ann Arbor Room, League,
r: Mr. Roger^Alien, "An Explan
and Demonstration of the Prin-
and Techniques of Oral Interpre-
r Board, January graduation an-
ement orders taken, Nov. 13-20,
q-5 p.m., SAB.
, Basic Judaism, Nov. 14, 7:30
flue!.
a Alpha Eta, meeting, Nov. 14,
im., Speech Clinic. Speaker: Dr.
a Phi, cabinet meeting Nov. 14,
n., Green Room, First Methodist
s.
opal Student Foundation, lunch-
Canterbury House following the
p.m. ceiebration of ;Holy Coin-
p at the churcth,Nov. 15, 218,N.
n . *
uate Student Council, meeting,
, 7:30 p.m., West Conference Run.,
'i.

RUDOLF SERKIN
"The greatest living pianist,
equalled by no other pianist and
no other interpretive musician."
(New York Herald Tribune)

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue,....... .........Bach
Sonata in D Major, K. 311 ................ . .Mozart
Sonata inF Minor, Op. 57 ................Beethoven
Variations and Fugue on a
Theme of Handel, Op. 24 .............Brahms
Tickets-3.50, 3.00, 2.50, 2.00, 1.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Memorial Tower

WM".. .O.,dby NORMAN CORWIN-a Pit Otry hW P.uxoxe.a3
"EXCITING THEATRE" ... Seattle Times
RIVALRY CAPTURES AUDIENCE"...
San Diego Tribune
TICKETS - $2.50-$2.00-$1.00
Box Office Open 10 A.M.-8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM

* Week Nights at 7 dnd 9 P.M.

0

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FOR YOUR

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MEDIUM THIN HEEL

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Tonight and Friday
7:00 and 9:45 P.M.
(color)
LAWRENCE OLIVIER
ROBERT NEWTON
*f
Sa turelay 7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 P.M.
"GASLIGHT
CHARLES BOYER

LL5

I III1

NLDING
R I DAY
GET MVORE OU
GO OUT TO
MAID Y
DAV
THE ACTRE
A "PLAY" If

CI4mMASCOP9 E
- SATURDAY-
ELVIS PRESLEY'
"'Jaihouse Rock"

I

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1

BEEP BEEP BEEP
DANCE DANCE DA
"Reach for the MoI

vndXhc

N CE

NO 2-25
T OF LIFE-.
A MOVIE.
E53 HAD
IN MINI

' y:

Dance to your favorite tune

in

MEETING

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11

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