100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jnderdeveloped Countries

attempts by

m..
irly

nomics
ots of
Icoun-l
o very
of in-
)Lack:

if new com-
easing total
mmuriity.
.so be caused
the absence
note savings,
ause
investment.
y wide cause
Tres nrticu

/'

-Daily-David Arnold

UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIST-Hans W. Singer of the secre-
tariat of the United Nations explained the roots of inflation in
underdeveloped countries to the Economics Club Monday.
developed countries' export pro- meet inflation In industrialized
ducts have a strong inflationary countries, particularly in Europe,
impact. are making it difficult for under-.
The economist added during a developed nations to solve their
question period that attempts to own inflationary problems;.

Police Ease
Pulp Books
Censor Ban
Remember the times when stu-
dents haunted bookstalls to pur-
chase censored books, such as "Ten
North Frederick Street?"
But the nations paperback book
business is no longer seriously
threatened by police censorship
pressures, according to Frederick
H. Wagman, director of libraries.
Instead problems of maintaing
good sources of material and de-
veloping systems of distribution
must be met by the industry.
Oppose Pornography
"Book publishers are as opposed
to pornography and obscenity as
any troubled parent, but they have
recognized that hysterical and ill
considered censorship would un-
dermine not only the freedom to
publish but the basic freedom to
read of every citizen," Wagman
said.
Wagman cited a number of re-
cent, precedent-establishing court
decisions concerning censorship
which support the views of the
book publishers.
These decisions grant that 1) a
book may not be prohibited gener-
ally because it is unsuitable for
children; 2) police have no author-
ity to ban a book on grounds of
obscenity-they may make arrests
so the question of obscenity may
be determined after a trial, as
required by law; 3) publications
must be judged as a whole and not
by isolated passages for obscenity;
4) treatment of sex and sex rela-
tionships is not in itself obscene;
and 5) police may not ban all
books and magazine on a list of
disapproved publications issued by
a church-supported organization.
Notes Factors
Wagman noted four new factors
which make the future of paper-
backs look brighter.
He notes that American authors
are emphasized to a greater extent
and the supply of titles available
for reprinting is considerable larg-
er. Also, non-fiction reading is
increasing, broadening not only
the number of titles for republica-
tion but als the market.
Increasing the number of sales
are highly attractive formats,
Wagman continued. Despite the
weakness of distribution, Wagman
sees the present system reaching
a higher proportion of the total
population.
Attributes Use
He attributes the use of paper-
backs by schools and colleges as an
adjunct to the textbook and re-
serve reading books in the library
as a hopeful development.
"The paper-bound book business
is not In danger of outside police
censorship pressures. Nor is it
likely to succumb to internal cen-
sorship-the adapting of contro-
versial /books to the demaiids or
standards of the mass audience,"
Wagman said.

Corwin's 'Rivalry' To Re-enact
Great Lincoln-Douglas Debate

The historic Liricoln-Douglas de-
bate wil be depicted in the pre-
Broadway production of Norman
Corwin's "The Rivalry" at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditorium,
The author, Corwin, will diregt
this two-act play of the century-
old .slavery debate between the
Great Emancipator, Lincoln, and
his rival for the Presidency, Doug-
las, in the third production in the
current Lecture Course.
-Raymond Massey will be seen as
Abraham Lincoln with Martin
Gabel as his rival, Stephen A.
Douglas. Agnes Moorehead will
portray Adele Douglas.
Known for his portrayal of Lin-
coln, Massey was seen in Ann

Arbor four years ago in "John
Brown's Body.": He has also ap-
peared on stage and screen in
Sherwood's "Abe Lincoln in Illi-
nois.,,
Martin Gabel was seen on
Broadway last year, co-starring:
with Jayne Mansfield in "WillSuc-
cess Spoil Rek Hunter?" He also
produced the drama "Hidden
River."
Miss Moorehead has been seen
in Ann Arbor in the performances
of "Sorry, Wrong Number' and
"Don Juan in Hell." Her most re-
cent movie role was in "Raintree
County."
Tickets for this production are
available at the Hill Auditorium
Box Office.

IN A
NEW P1,AV...

TOMORROW -8:4
Pre-Broadway Enga
L Powerful Theatre S
pAUL GREGORY

RAYMOND MASSEY
. as Lincoln

4..H NORMAN CORWIF
"EXCITING THEATRE"

AGNES MOOREHEAD
. . as Mrs. Douglas

M Af.iO
. . . Sea.

maintain
SUMMER OF 1959:
eveloped
y out this European
s," Singer
vestment. articpants To Be Selected

SRIVALRY' CAPTURES AUDIENCE" .. .
San Diego Tri
TICKETS - $2.50-$2.00-$1.00
Box Office Open 10 A.M.-5 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Subscribe to
ThMihgnDaily

I1

>--=

i t.

too big

>ressures. Viol
. up and down
! price of und

Edgar K. Orr, director of the
Eore Orr International Service organi-
oe- zation, is currently attempting to
and' organize a group of University stu-
nd dents for a trip to Europe in 198.
An organizational meeting was
ent held at -8 p.m. yesterday in Rm. 3A
in of the Michigan Union for inter-
er- ested students.
One of the unusual features of
the trip is an orientation period
from January to June during
which students will attend weekly
discussion sections on the back-
e ground of the countries to be
visited.
Last spring, a meeting was ar-
ranged by Orr to see how the cam-
pus would react to such an idea.
ge- "Tour members,' Orr said, "will

'/J

live where there will be a close
association with youth of many
countries'."
The selection of the twenty stu-
dents to go: on this trip, Oarr ex-
plained, will be made on the basis
of the student's "personal interests,
ability to get along with others
and record in school and extra-
curricular activities."
The countries visited will include
France, Italy, Austria, Switzerland,
Germany, Holland and England.
Speech Group
to Hear Talk
n Education
Prof. Hsrld M. Dorr of the poli-
tical science department will ad-
dress the speech assembly at 4
p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Prof. N. Edd Miller, of the speech
department, will introduce Prof.
Dorr, whose topic will be "State-
wide Education."
Sponsored by the Department of
Speech, the lecture is open to the
general public without charge.

Child Stud y
To, Be Held,

"Integration vs. Segregation," a
program on the gifted child, will be
presented at 7:30 p.m. today in the
cafeteria of the School of Educa-
tion.
IThe panel, sponsored by the Stu-
dent National Education Associa-
tion, will be comprised of men who
are interested and involved in the
work for the education of the
gifted
Movie To Feature.
Facts on Satellite
The movie lecture "Challenge of
Outer Space," featuring the Ger-
man scientist Dr. von Braun, will
be shown at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Friday at the Rackham Lecture
hall.
The movie will show how a
satellite is put in an orbit and how
a space platform could be con-
structed.

U

PIANIST
Friday, November 15, at 8:3
HiLL AUDITORIUM

PROGRAM

*the
1 atte
Scier

nd
ne

nt the University
ion of American
the congress
Nov. 18 to Nov.
m financed as a
American Coun-
Icieties.
turn by way of

Talk

D, rToTalk
On Climates
Of The Earth'
A preview of the earth's future
climatic conditions will be pre-
sented today by. Prof. Erling Dorf
of Princeton University at the An-
nual Ermine Cowles Case Memorial
Lecture at 8 p.m. in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Prof. Dorf will speak on the topic
of "The Earth's Changing Cli-
mates." Illustrating his talk with
colored slides, he will describe
methods for learning about cli-
mates of the past and shifting cli-
matic zones in each successive geo-
logic epoch since the Eocene.
At the meeting the annual Case
Student Award will be granted to
a graduate student enrolled in
earth -sciences at the University
for outstanding scholarship and
attainment.
A graduate of the University of
Chicago, Prof. Dorf has been with
Princeton's geology department
since 1926. He has served as an
authority on Paleobotany for the
National Research Council for 22
years and was its chairman from
1941 to 1946.

RUDOLF SERKIN
"The greatest living pianist,
equalled by no other bianist and
no other interpretive musician."
(New York Herald Tribune)

I.

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue ...... . ...........B
Sonata in DMajor,'K.311 ..................Moz
Sonata in FrMinor, Op. 57.................Beethov
Variations and Fugue on a
Theme of Handel, Op. 24...........Brai
Tickets-3.50, 3.00, 2.50, 2.00, 1.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIET
Burton Memorial Tower

AAAmb
e
1 0 0 ,,, "

n Worthy
-American
he second
bment lec-
Rackham

rNOW ! II ~~
.i GET MORE 01
GO OUT T
DAYIiEN_
IN _ __ ___ _THE ACTR
I W T~'w A "PLAY"I

DIAL
NO 2-2513

BUT OF LIFE-
O A MOVIE.

7

peak on "Rising
t it Expects of
r spent six weeks
'hina, for which
,ean passport. He
Aaovered the Ban-
of Asian and Af-

ESS HAD
IN MINb.

V

A GLEE CLU8 g(I(ARSAL
WITHOUT A LUCKY BREAK? JAJ~MA

I-

Results

night, Tonight, Tonight
Bob Elliot Jazz Quartet

MUSIC MAJORS!Know how to change
a glee club from a loud crowd to a
lyrical miracle? Simple: just promise
'em a Lucky break! A Lucky's a light
smoke-the right smoke--for anyone.
It's all cigarette-all fine tobacco!
And that naturally light, wonderfully
good-tasting tobacco is toasted to taste
even better. Hold your rehearsal with-
out a Lucky break, and you'll get
nothing but Choir Ire! Chorus: Light
up a light smoke... a Lucky Strike!

F

:*

ying Every Wednesday

*"

RICAN LEGION
NO 8-6141
MEMBERS and GUESTS

saw

urs. m N
The World's Mightiest Masterpiece
Of Temptation and Terror!

WHAT, ! D. 0. T f
JOHN BREVELLE, Bug Drug
OKLAHOMA A. Q.

WHAT DOES A GEOLOGIST COLLECT#
MEREDITH SCRELLPFEFFER. Strata Data
U. OF WISCONSIN

WHAT IS A BURGLAR ALARM?
I 'f.
PAYMOND COmEAU. JR.. Crime Chime
HOLY CROSS

C ItG A R E T T E S
WHAT IS VERY SMALL TYPED

Dial
02-3136

KARL ANTYLA,
U. OF DETROIT

Squint Print

WHAT IS A SUMM RISHMAt

-~,. . ,.PRINT BY

WHAT IS BOVINE SMALL TALK

n

Don't just stand there...
STICKLE! MAKE $25

I '

I

Sticklers are simple riddles with two-word rhyming
answers. Both words must have the same number of

~u;[u~a'm liii

I

I

I I

V1 I1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan