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November 10, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

County Juvenile Home Officials Quit Jobs

Supervisors of the County Juve-
nile Home, Elwyn C. Tennant and
his wife Beatrice, resigned Friday.
The supervisors had been ac-
cused of allegedly countermanding
orders of Jacob E. Terpstra, super-
intendent of the home. A series of'
tiffs and "personality conflicts"
were fanned into the open three
imonths ago, according to Probate
Judge John W. Conlin. ,
Hired last June, the Tennants
were on six months probationary
employment. During this time,

Judge Conlin said the home was
kept in the best condition it has
been in since it opened in March,
1956.
Judge Conlin and Juvenile Divi-
sion Director Frank J. Hodges
"strongly recommended to the
Tennants that they resign." Com-
plaints from juveniles that the
Tennants were too strict" were
also blamed.
The complaints of the juveniles
were discounted, however, until

hearings were held. The Tennants
agreed to such hearings, but Judge
Conlin said hearings would not
alter the personality conflicts be-
tween the couple and Terpstra.
The Tennants were reported to
have left the city Friday with two
weeks advanced pay and a "very
good" letter of recommendation.
They filled the vacancy leftl
after Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rubin-
stein resigned as supervisor and
matron of the home.

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"THE BC
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1958
"PONT
BONNtl

Collins Shop

STATE
and
LIBERTY

-Daily--Fred Shippey
UNITY SERVICE--Sigma Alpha Mu pledges construct a sandbox for the Ann Arbor Co-operative
y. Eighty University fraternity, pledges volunteered their services for six community projects yes-
morni1g. The program is under the sponsorship of the Junior Inter-Fraternity Council. Other ,
included pulling stumps, painting, and rakin g legaves.
dges Assist With Community Programs

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B

ARTON HUTHWAITE
ng a sandbox can be quite
rience.
Alpha Mu fraternity
liscovered this fact yester-
'ning. Manning saws and
s, seven willing 'pledges
the assistance of the Ann
o-operative Nursery.
were but ope of the six
y pledgeclassespartici-
n the Junior Inter-Fra-
Council's community serv-
ram yesterday.

Faced with the task ofbuilding.
two sandboxes and a' blackboard,
the men pooled their knowledge of
play* equipment construction to,
accomplish the task set before
them.
One pledge, pencil in ear, set.
aside his saw for a moment. "I
never thought I'd see a sandbox
again, let alone help build one,"
Henry Sandweiss, '60, smiled.
Another pledge, trying in vain
to remove some putty sticking to
ates Reveal

eft

OPEN HOUSES:
SGC Candid

election Platforms,Views

his hands, took a different view
of the problem at hand. "This is
good experiente. I might go into
the sandbox business some day,"
Harry Newman, '61, laughed.
Clean Woodwork, Paint
The six pledges doWned coffee
and donuts after their task was
accomplished. Newman was still
having trouble with the putty but
managed to drink several cups.
Sigma Phi Epsilon pledges spent
their morning at the Ann Arbor
'Thrift Shop cleaning woodwork
and painting. The money derived
from the project will be turned
over to worthy charitable organi-,
zations.
Zeta Psi pledges drove out to
clean a 40 acre plot of land for the
Pittsfield School System. Stumps
were pulled up and fences pulled
down by the volunteer pledges.
Help Community Relations
The JIFC community service
projects are designed to improve
community ,relations, fraternity
public relations director :Hank
Kerr, '59, said. "A service award
is presented to the Pledge class
which participates in the most
services to the community, the
campus and its fraternity, he
added.
Future JIFC community service
projects include the stuffing of
40,,000 envelopes with Christmas
Seals for the Washtenaw County
Tuberculosis Association.
The material will be distributed
by the JIF to each of the 42 fra.
ternity pledge classes early this
week.

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Fabric Soft-Glb-+

Color: white, orange, black,

;at naIQy Adyertise
NOVEMBER\
HARPERS BAZAA

(Continued from Page 1)
some new kind of incentive, in
order to decrease its turnover and
to encourage top people to work
for it. The opportunity to become
Berlin Begims
Reconstruetion
Of Synagogue-
BERLIN MA) -- West Germany
erases another scar of the Nazi era
todayi
On the site of a Berlin synagogue
destroyed by Hitler's storm troop-
ers on "Crystal Night" 19 years
ago, the new Germany will begin
construction of a new Jewish com-
munity center.
The synagogue was one of hun-
dreds put to the torch on Crystal
Night, Nov. 10, 1938,, as,. storm
troopers ragedthrough scores of
German cities. The night got its
name because of the great quanti-
ties of glass underfoot from ruined
synagogues and wrecked Jewish
shops.
On Berlin's Fasanenstrasse that
night, jeering Nazis held back
firefighters -as Germany's largest
synagogue became a twisted,
blacked shell.
Today, West German officials
will lay there the cornerstone of
a building dedicated to Germany's
once-persecuted Jews.

a member of SGC would serve this
purpose.
Against Direct System
Council president Joe Collins,
358, came out against Jo Hardee's
suggested direct system. He said
such a move was unfeasible and
uneffective.
He does not want to see the
Council expanded either. He said
the present size is just right for
a group which had to work to-
gether to accomplish things.
He also said, that with member-
ship at its present size, each pei-
son fills the full responsibility
of his taks, and therefore acts in
a 'most mature manner.
However, Collins said that he
would like to see an investigation
into the possibility of adding a
foreign student and a graduate
student to the Council.
Not Properly Represented
He. said that neither Iof these
groups is properly represented and
could bring a great deal to the
Council.
- Some people said that the size
is not the problem of representa-
tion, but rather the -people who
are elected.
Bert Getz, '59BAd., who is also
Inter-Fraternity Council secretary,
said that affiliated people should
be well represented on SOC. This
is one area, he explained, that has
not been well represented in the
past.
"It's through my duty to the
affiliated system that I'm run-
ning," he said. He is not in favor
of expanding the Council.

_/
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the university inter-arts magazine

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