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September 16, 1957 - Image 39

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

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16, 1957

. THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAI

16, 1957 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

la tm e n Perform well,
!jose Title by One Point

CORNER OF HOOVER AND STATE:
Athletic Administration Guides Michigan Sports

NY>--

By DAVE LYON
Thaiks largely to the return of
three men to second-semester
competition, Michigan's 1956-57
wrestling season turned out much
better than the team's uninspiring
early-season performance would
have indicated. .
The twin problems of ineligi-
bility of lettermen and inexperi-
ence of their replacements plagued
Coach Cliff Keen during the first
half of the season. In their first
dual meets, the matmen showed a
mediocre 1-4 record.
They dropped their opening
meet to star-studded Pittsburgh,
25-3, trounced Indiana, 19-9, then
were beaten for the second time in
30 years by a Northwestern, team,
22-10.
Lose to PurfIue, Illinois
Soon after the Wolverine grap-
plers suffered successive defeats
at the hands of Purdue and Illi-
nois during the lull between semes-
ters, Mike Rodriguez, 1956 Big
Ten 157-1b. titlist, Max Pearson,
former Conference 130-1b. cham-
pion and veteran heavyweight
Steve Zervas regained eligibility.
Although there were doubts that
the three men could regain their
previous effectiveness on the mat
because of the long layofT, the re-
turn of this trio marked a turning
point in Michigan, wrestling for-
tunes.
In the next meet, the bolstered
Wolverines overcame previously
undefeated Iowa, 14-12, and they
began to be considered contenders
for the Big Ten title they had
won in 1956.
Michigan State was also rated
highly in Conference mat circles,
and with good reason, for the
Spartans edged the Maize and
Blue grapplers, 16-15.
Whip Ohio State
Michigan rebounded with a 16-
11 decision over Ohio State, and
closed out its dual meet season by
scaring top-rated Minnesota, but
the Gophers pulled out a 16-14
decision.
Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa and
Michigan State were considered
the. top contenders for the Con-
ference team title, but when the
meet took place, only two teams
were ever in the running.
By a margin of a single point,
Michigan was deprived of its third
title in a row by a Minnesota
squad excelling in depth.
Minnesota's team depth and the

way the Gophers used it to advan-
tage can be illustrated by the fact
that they outscored Michigan, 21-
,7, in second-place points. The
Wolverines, on the other hand,
bested Minnesota, 20-10, in first-
place scoring, and 19-16 in miscel-
laneous points, tying the winners,
8-8, in third- and fourth-place
meet points.
Even so, Michigan's team effort,
especially' the performances of
Pearson, Rodriguez, 167-pounder
Jack Marchello, 177-pounder Karl
Lutomski, and 123-pounder Dan
Deppe caused Keen to observe,
"This was one of the greatest per-
formances by a bunch of boys I've
ever seen in my 33 years of coach-
ing wrestling."
Pearson, who won the Confer-
ence 130-lb. championship in 1955,
displayed his old form during the
Big Ten meet and regained his
Beightdivision title by rallying to
beat Indiana's Joe Shook, 7-5.
Rodriguez, 1956 157-lb. champ,,
literally pinned his way to another
crown. Three of his four victorious
matches during the tournament
were decided by falls. The last one
was applied on Minnesota's Ron
Baker in 2:07 of the first period.
Marchello Makes Finals,
Marchello, 1956 177-lb. Big Ten
titleholder and mainstay of the
team during its leaner days of the
1956-57 season, battled his way to
a meeting with Northwestern's
Ken Kraft with the 167-lb. cham-
pionship at stake.
Undefeated Kraft won a close
7-4 decision to take home the
Wildcats' lone individual crown.
Lutomski, who was no ball of
fire during the dual-meet season,
and whom hardly' anybody was
picking to finish high in the 177-
lb. division, won all but one of his
tournament matches to place
third. Diligent Deppe won a cor-
responding place in his weight
class.
According to Keen, Lutomski
"typified the fine spirit, the won-
ddrful desire" displayed by the
team all season long.
So it was not too surprising
v hen Michigan finished first in
team points among Big Ten
schools at the NCAA champion-
ship meet.
Even though Keen remarked
that the tournament was "not a
team event for us, but a chance

for the individual to do his best,"
the Maize and Illue picked up
enough team points to finish sixth
in the nation.
Pearson and Rodriguez both
grappled their way to the NCAA
finals in their divisions, only to
meet defeat. Penn State's Johnny
Johnston edged Pearson, 7-5, in
the 130-lb. match, and Oklahoma
A&M's Doug Blubaugh built up
a lead and held off Rodriguez' re-
peated bids for a 9-3 157-lb. vic-
tory.
Marchello Meets Powell
Marchello, competing at 167
pounds, ran into Iowa State's
Frank Powell in the quarterfinals,
and was eliminated, 7-2.
A long-range outlook at the
coming season's prospects tends
to be optimistic.
Only three members of last sea-
son'9 team are graduating. Deppe
and Rodriguez, together with 147-
pounder Lloyd Hamady, will be
sorely missed.
But the returning team mem-
bers have one year more experi-
ence behind them, which should
prove a valuable asset. Marchello
and Pearson head the list of re-
turnees.,
Sophomore material should be
plentiful, judging fi'om the per-
,formance of last year's freshman
team. Mike Hoyles, Jim McNaugh-
ton, Fred Collins, Bob Scott, Art
Carlson, Gus Miller, Jay McMahon
and Fred Olm distinguished them-
.selves last year, and should help
Keen fill in the holes at 123, 147,
and 157 pounds.

JACK MARCIIELLO
... 167-lb. senior

What makes Michigan's spor ts'
program operate as smoothly as a
well-oiled piece of machinery?
It goes under the official, busi-
ness-like heading of the athletic
administration, and although it
isn't a glamorous organization,
without it there would be no such
thing as the Michigan Wolverines.
regardless of the sport.
Many Elements
Housed in a bright two-year-old
building at the corner of Hoover
and State, the administration is
composed of many elements, not
least of which is the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Athletics.
The two most important func-
tions of the Board involve Michi-
gan's role in the Big Ten, and the
development of the athletic plant
that has fast become one of the
most extensive of any in the coun-
It is the Board that decides
try.
Michigan's vote in Western Con-
ference affairs. such as Rose-Bowl
policy, eligibility matters and
schedules.
Members of the Board include
Director of Athletics H. 0. "Fritz"
Crisler, 10 faculty and University
representatives, three alumni and
two students. This year the stu-
dents are John Herrnstein, star
fullbac, and Cy Hopkins, All-
American swimmer. Prof. Marcus
L. Plant is Michigan's Board repre-
sentative to the Big Ten.
Beehive'of Activity
A beehive of activity is an apt
description of the actual office
work that goes on during every
week of the year, and not just the
football season.
Each of the varsity coaches has
an office in the Building, where he

meetings with visiting coaches,
friends, etc.
Correspondence, which could be
a big headache for a college coach,
is no problem at all with the large
corps of efficient secretaries on
hand.
A person with literally a million
friends, especially right before a
sellout at the Stadium, is person-
able Ticket Manager Don Weir. A
fine solution to Weir's ticket prob-
lem would be to build 100,000 seats
on the 50-yd. line, for according

holds press interviews and private I to requests, that has still re-I

mained the most popular spot from
which to view the happenings of
the gridiron.
Keeping newspapers, radio sta-
tions, and magazines well informed
on prospects of the various Michi-
gan teams, including statistics, is
the gigantic job of Les Etter, the
University's Sports Publicity Di-
rector.
Handles Press Releases
All press releases for national
distribution concerning. Michigan
athletes and athletics emanate
from his office.

I , _ _ _ _ _ - _ _- _ _ _ -

the

It is also the responsibility
Etter to provide press box facilil
for all qualified reporters who t
sire their use.
Especially during the busy fa
ball season, Etter's job is ma
moth in allotting necessary spf
to the scores of journalists, pl
tographers, publicity men, broi
casters and transmitting mach
operators who demand it. T
problem has become imme:
with the coming of television
college football.

tradition

That is

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livew wfl~r% ." ". "" a "
So 0 a .%,
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a 0%4

MICHIGAN'

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r$

performance

KARL LUTOMSKI
. 177-lb. junior

LOWEST PRICES

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