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November 05, 1957 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

olds First Meeting

V .

Two States
To Choose

College Roundup

Organization N<

-,Daily-Toby Chapman
MODERN JAZZ-The South Quad Trio provided entertainment
for the new Modern Jazz.Society at their Sunday night meeting.
Terry Harrington, a visitor from Detroit, supplied -the saxophone
for the group.

Governiors
Two gubernatorial elections to-
day are the only highlights in an
otherwise dull fall election period
across the nation.
In what is traditionally the.
most "off" of off years - the one
following a presidential election--
campaigns for tAhe top executive
posts in Virginia and New Jersey
have drawn national attention.
In New Jersey, Robert B. Mey-
ner, the state's first Democratic
Governor in 14 years is running
for election against Republican
candidate Malcolm S. Forbes. The
GOP is going all out to win, send-
ing Vice-President Richard Nixon,
Secretary of Labor James P.
Mitchell and Secretary of the In-
terior Fred Seaton to-, campaign'
for its candidate. - f
Despite President Dwight D.
Eisenhower's 756,000 plurality in
the state in 1956 and the 2-1 Re-
publican majority in registration,
Meyner is odds-on favorite to win.
If he should win in this normally
Republican state his reported de-
'ire for the Presidency. would be
enhanced.
In Virginia the major issue is
not politics but integration-how
to prevent it. Both candidates fa-
vor segregation. The Democrat, J.
Lindsay Almond, takes the strong-
er position by supporting "massive
resistance" through a series of;
state laws.
Taking a more moderate view is
his opponent, State Senator Ted
Dalton who favors complfing with
the law but retaining segregation
in fact.
The contest may give some.in-
dication of the South's \political
reaction to the President's use of
troops in Little Rock.
In New York City two princi-
pal contenders are vying for
mayor. Robert F. Wagner, Jr., in-
cumbent and candidate of the
Democrats and Liberals is being
opposed by Robert K. Christen-
berry, hotel executive and candi-
date of the Republicans. Political
observers pick Wagner by a large
majority.

'oledo to hear ar-
order to feel jazz

Jazz Discussions
ssions on the difference
East Coast and West
azz, classical music and
)r future topics were' con-
the anti-jazz fans voiced
inions. "It's noise," or, "I
hought about jazz; this
1 give .me an opportunity
f I could ever appreciate
ading planning body vol-
i to work on these sug-

Group Hears'
Poll Results,
The Literary College Steering
Committee yesterday heard re-
ports of a program poll concern-
ing faculty sentiment on a junior
year abroad.
According to Leslie Dietz, '58,
chairman of the committee, fac-
ulty members interviewed were
generally enthusiastic.
The reports, which will continue
at the next meeting, will be used
to help-choose a school in Europe
at which the University might in-
stitute its junior year program.,a
Miss Dietz announced to the
Steering Committee that the
Honors Council nad requested
their attendance at a meeting to
sample student opinion on the.
Honors Program.

Unlimited class cutting and an-
other proposal to abandon restric-
tions before a holiday recess, have
been approved by faculy mem-
bers at Trinity College.
Students, however, are respon-
sible :at all times for assigned
work.
Tightening other a c a d e m i c
rules, the faculty voted to put on
probation any student who has
not receivedg passing. grades in
four courses with grades of at
least seventy in two of these
courses.
Fraternities were also affected
in the scholarship changes. A pro-
posal passed; by the Inter-Frater-
nity Council states that no man
shall pledge a fraternity unless he
has received a 70 average at the
So n cl u s i o n of the' previous
semester.
Until a satisfactory honors sys-
tem can be worked out, cheating
in classes can be eliminated by,
following four rules, van Roy
Kottman of Iowa State College,
said.
The regulations specify the use
of alternate tests for alternate
rows. One or more .monitors in
the room at all times during the
test - . . to actually patrol the
room and not read a newspaper.
In addition, old exams should
be available to all students in
classes so that they will have
equal .opportunity to study them.
Finally to have the tests reviewed,
before, a department committee
where the questions are judged
for their coverage of ,the prin-
ciples involved and not mere
trivia.
Kottman urged that all organ-
ized residences keep an up-to-date
file on former exams.
Hale To Talk
On Space Law
Andrew G. Haley, president of
the International Astronautical
Society, will speak at 8 p.m. to-
night in the Architecture Audi-
torium on the "Law of the Age of
Space."
The lecture is sponsored by the
Law School, the Student Bar As-
sociation, and the Engineering Re-
search Institute. Also appearing
will be Welf Heinrich, Prince of
Hanover.
Haley, a Washington, D. C. at-
torney and former head of the
world's largest rocket company,
will present charts and graphs
relative to space law, as well as a
selection of pictures of the Rus-
sian space satellite.

Georgian towers, i vertical en-
tries andma fireplace in every suite
will no longer characterize houses t
built on the bank of the Charlesl
River, Harvard University offi-
cials admitted.
It would cost $25,000 per bed
to duplicate existing residence
halls. However, the traditional
"collegiate way of living" may be
preserved with new planning
ideas and stil keep the cost down
to about $14,285,
Features of new houses will in-
corporate a study-bedroom for
each student where "he can shut
the door and be alone." These
rooms will be arraiged in groups.
of three with a common living
room on the floor above that is
reached by a private staircase.
To off balance the attraction of
the older houses, one group has
suggested" that more and smaller
dining rooms be built for the
residents.
"ji kIl Ifll![b

(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is availalbe to of-
ficiallyrecognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
Deutscher Verein, meeting, Nov. 5,1
7:30 p.m. Room 3-G Union. Movie and
discussion by Prof. Reinhart of German
dramatist Gerhart Hauptmann. Free to
members.
Rifle Club, practice, Nov. 5, 6:30-9:00
p~m., Rifle Range.
* * *
Physics Club, me gting, Nov. 6. 7:30
p.m., 2038 Randall Laboratory. Speak-
er: Dr. DeRocco, "Certain Features of
Macromolecules."
* '* *
Debate Team, general meeting, Nov.
5, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 2040 Frieze Bldg. All
welcome.
Hillel Foundation, Elementary Yid-
dish Classes, Nov. 5, 8:00 p.m., Hillel.
* .* *
Russian Circle, meeting, Nov. 5, 8:00-

NOW

IThe
Three
Feces

i 10:00

"This new campus club is com-
posed of actual jazz musicians
themselves, student disc jockeys
and amateur music appreciators
who show by their acting partici-
pation that they want to study
jazz, find out what it means -
and is," commented Hoffa.

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jEpiscopal Student Fco
fast at Canterbury Hou
7:00 a.m. celebration of
ion at church, Nov. 6, 2
Episcopal Student I
formal tea for studer
Nov. 5, 4:00-6:00 p.m.,
Senior Society, bu
Nov. 5, 8:00 p.m.. Cave
ping discussion.
Lutheran Student As
p.m., 'Lutheran Student
er: Dr. Muecke, "The1
Classical Cultures on
ment."
Ballet Club. advanced
beginners, 8:15 p.m.,
Gym, Dance Studio.

Hillel, UJA
6, 4:30 p.m.,

f- This is
the ten-fot pot
the Army
wouldn't
toucn
this
hilarious
story
with..,
G - - e
/rE R

I@'

C/A
I"
"'HIGHEST RATING! A NEW STAR

eptain's n

NO ONE SEATED DURING THE-SENSATIONAE."

r..NeXt AttrCion...
"THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTREI
.:ad00000 0 sm :. :: .x" :: s":>;::c {; .:>: ' 'c .:.......

AM

TONIGHT
and Wed.

f1

DIAL

JOANNE
WOODWARD
iSTEREOPHONIC SOND

1

"A NOTEWORTHY EXAMPLE OF HOW A
OUGHT TO BE PUT TOGETHER!" -New
I OF
'>APL Vii
Sophia LOREN " Vittorio De SICA
Silvana MAGNANO

7 1

TO SHOW FILMS, SLIDES:

b_

Africa Talks To Begin TravelSeries

series

ted travel

If ,

U

talks by University faculty mem-
bers will begin Sunday and con-
tinue throughout the year, ac-
cording to James M. Davis, direc-
tor of the International Center.
Sponsored by the International
SCenter,the series will include dis-
cussions on the findings of special
kL BY JURY" research projects carried on in
- and other parts of the world. Faculty
meRCERERmbers will also include experi-
SORCRER"ences while on sabbatical leaves
and other foreign tours.
, "Report: Africa," three discus-
2 sions on Africa, will begin the
series. They will encompass vari-
NOVEMBER SPECIALS
S HOME JOURNAL L
months for $4.47 (reg. $6--2 yr.).
S DIGEST Q
months for $2 (reg. $3 yr.)
find $" Bill me Q
Student Periodical Agehcy, Box 2006 or phone
'61.
or gifts -- Xmas, etc.

ous aspects of present life on that
continent.
Davis emphasized that the talks
will not be lectures and the talks
are by "people who were actually
there."
"If everything works out all
right on this series, we will plan
more of them - probably in the
spring," Davis said.
Prof. Douglas D. Crary of the
geography department, will give
an account of his journey last fall
from Capetown, South Africa, to
Cairo, Egypt, entitled "African
View" at 7:30 pim. Sunday in
Auditorium A, Angell Hall. During
a sabbatical leave, Prof. Crary
studied the. organization of small
African villages.
Bretton tov Speak
"Emerging New Nations of West
Africa: Ghana and Nigeria," will
be discussed by Prof. Henry L.
Bretton of the political science de-
partment and Joe Collins, '58,
president of Student Government
Council, at 7:30 p.m, Nov. 17 in
Auditorium B, Angell Hall.
Prof. Bretton, on a grant from
Rackham School of Graduate
Studies, visited the Gold Coast of
Africa in 1956 to study political
affairs in Ghana. As one of three
United States representatives sent
by the. World University Service,
Collins traveled to Africa last
summer to attend a three-week
seminar in Accra, Ghana.
Visits South Africa
Having traveled to South Africa
several times since 1950, Prof.
Chester B. Slawson of the geology
department will talk on "The De-
velopment of Resources and
People in Africa" at 7:30 p.m.,
Nov. 24 in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.

* Prof, Slawson has served as a
consulting geologist to industrial
and governmental a'gencies for
many years and is particularly in-
terested in the mining of indus-
trial diamonds in Africa.
All programs are open to the
public without charge.

. . added enjoyment . . .
3rd IN OUR TRAVEL-EDVENTURE
"STRUGGLE IN THE NORTH

SERIES

JACK LEMMON'ERNE K"VACS
ATIRYN GRAN- ARTHUR S'COINNE
s.MICKEY RMONEY DA W

READ AND USE THE CLASSIFIE[

Fashions from Around the World

V
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.d %

SHIRTS

pretent s

International
Variety Show
Cultural Exhibits
Foreign Cuisine

Beautifully finished and indi-
vidually packaged in real dur-
able transparent, PLIOFILM.
Pliofilm (unlike cellophone) does not rip
or crock. Protects and glorifies your most
iniportant wordrobe. -

Bazaar
Dalnees
Songs

Ir .LI

C ,

INDIA STUDENT ASSN.
presents
r FROM BROADWAY RUN
FIRST TIME IN WESTERN HEMISPHERE
ROGER L. STIM~S
it the oppro.;w 5 THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
o d ;n c p*o- ,fri . -*#.
THE ANtRICAN NATIONAL THEATRE AND ACADEMy
SHAN TA RAO
KathakaliDancers and Musicians.
SCompany 'of 20
Produced by JOH COAST
.. ~s6rod~r "go!'%1"dintA2*$ Tov*od

WORLD'S FAIR
Friday, November 8th -8 to 12 P.M.
(Second and third Floors of Michigan Union)

LESS 10%
CASH AND CARRY

30eh

Id

___ ____ __

SPORT SHIRTS

Announcing the Opening

* Expertly laundered in luke warm
water and vegetable oil soap.
* Carefully steam pressed on our
special sport shirt equipment.
Steam pressing prevents fusing
and. shining of delicate material.

of the NEW

UNION GAME ROOM

* Packaged in clear
PLIOFILM.

transparent

r

45C--

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