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September 16, 1957 - Image 28

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

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T

y

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1957

.... ...

4 Sip of Coke in Cafe Atmosphere

FROM CAMPUS FEUDS TO CALM FESTIVITY:

I

J-Hop Claims Title- to Oldest Organized 'U' Social Event

I

By ELEANOR GOLDBERG
Following 'a new tradition set
last year, J-Hop will again elimi-
nate the "dead week" during spring
registration.
The class of '59 this year pre-
sents the eighty - first annual
dance.
Formerly the event, which in-
cludes the year's latest permis-
sions (or women and a lifting of
the driving ban, was held be-
tween semesters. Because of a cal-
endar change eliminating the in-
ter-sernester period and sorority
rushing, the date has been changed
to Feb. 4.
Dance in Planning
The central cdmmittee, headed
by James Champion, has already
started to make plans for the big
event. Working with Champion
are Robert Arnove, who heads the
band committee, and Thomas
Creed, in charge of booths. Robert
Stahl heads btlilding and grounds.
Other committee chairmen are
Sally Kleinstecker, decorations;
Jo Anne Beecher, finance; Lysbit
Hoffman, programs, patrons and
favors; Dan Jaffe publicity; Mich-
ael Adel, special events; and Lyn-
da Genthe, tickets.
Festivities preceeding the formal
dance Tuesday night will begin

-- , 1

*

TO RELAX-Friday night in the Union's Little Club with informal dancing and refreshments.
t"

2hEan6IRUren Shop

presents

THE FINEST LINE

HUNDREDS OF COUPLES AT TEND THE ANNUAL J-HOP

Monday. Special late permissions
of 2:30 a.m. on Monday and 4 a.m.
Tuesday will be issued to coeds.

fir I

o f

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and Italy as well as domestic yarns. Also, pat-
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panies and a full line of knitting supplies.

At this time they may stay at
fraternity houses.
Former Side Events
Former events featured with J-
Hop have been ski trips, splash
parties, a fashion show and the
traditional fraternity parties and
breakfasts.
Last year's dance, entitled "La
Rue Basin" was framed about
New Orleans jazz night life. The
bands of Duke Ellington and Bud-
dy Morrow highlighted the affair.
J-Hop, reportedly the oldest so-
cial event on campus, has a long
and varied history of changes,
riots and campus feuds. Its ini-
tiating spark came in February,
1877, when a "merry score of cou-
ples swayed to the harmony of a
four-piece orchestra."
"Society Hop"
The party was dubbed "Society
Hop" four years later when the
Greek letter societies took it over.

Then it was given at a Main Street
emporium called "Hanks."
Even at this time; the dance was
surrounded by a weekend of fes-
tivities which included a comedy
club play, combined recitals by
University choral groups and fra-
ternity dances.
Two "ands were in store for
couples attending J-Hop in 1891 at
a new site, described as "an old
rink" downtown. In the following
years, prices rose to $1 per couple
at the dance, then held at a danc-
ing academy..
Once independents and four out-
cast fraternities had one dance in
Waterman Gym while nine others
fraternities held another in To-
ledo. Regents soon followed suit
and ruled the dance an all-cam-
pus affair to be sponsored with
equal representation for both af-
filiates and independents.
Coed Comes In
The turn of the century saw Uni-
versity coeds, who previously, had

not been considered good dates, in-
vited in great numbers to the
dance. Formerly, most partners
had been from the men's home
towns.
Spectators were banned from
the 1913 dance by J-Hop officials.
One group, described as "partly
riff-rgff and partly students,
stormed their way through the en-
trance and into the dance with the
aid of a gas pipe.
A fight ensued when a "heroic"
janitor fended them off with a pair
of Indian clubs and continued with
stones and fire extinguishers.
"Improper Tango"
The "last straw" came with the
observation that "several couples
at the Junior Hop had danced in
a manner that could hardly be
called proper." The tango was
therefore prohibited at all further
University dances.
Subsequently, there was no 1914
J-Hop.
Although recently J-Hops have
been very much calmer than be-
fore; the fun and festivities of the
past remain.
Positions for assistant publicity
and special events chairmen will
be open in the fall. Announcement
for interviews will be made some-
time during September in The
Daily.
This year's J-Hop will take place
Feb, 4, the Tuesday of Registra-
tion period. Classes begin two days
later.

.

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- --.

----

-_ ---- SIP I

..

There

are

those

who do it

,,

There are

those

who don't

Those

who

do - enjoy

campus

life

=the

most

(Ride

a

Bicycle,

Off

Course!)

I-

t

11

STU EN

SH

4

-.m -! -> -

I 1I

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