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September 16, 1957 - Image 27

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

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I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA (1W

]ANSWER TO INTERNATIONAL INTEGRATION:
Co-Op Residents Have Equal Share in Responsibilities, E

* SSuAr, L1AAv
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By ROBERTA SOFFIN
The answer to international in-
tegration in the University hous-
ing system has already been found
by the Inter-Cooperative Council.
In these co-op living units, stu-
dents of widely diversified back-
grounds live together, reaping the
benefits of their cultural ex-
change.
There are three men's, four wo-
men's, and one married couples'
co-ops, owned by the I.C.C. The
Co-ops are set tip and run en-
tirely by students who live or eat,
in the houses.
Each house is literally "turned

over" to its residents, who share
the responsibilities of food pur-
chasing and preparation and the
upkeep of the house, including
cleaning and repairs.
Co-ops operate under the Roch-
dale principles of cooperative liv-
ing: There is no discrimination of
membership because of race, col-
or,' religion, or political belief;
every member has one vote and
shares equally in all decisions;
duties and responsibilities are
equally shared by all members.
William Armstrong, Grad., pres-
ident of I.C.C., explains that the
working schedule demands four

to six hours per week from each
student. "Work holidays" are held
each semester, when a few extra
hours aredevoted to major or mi-
nor repairs to the house.
Students with any proficiency
in carpentry, plumbing, cooking,
dietetics, electrical servicing, book-
keeping, or administration are a
great asset to the house, he said.
Co-opers treasure their individ-
ualism. Armstrong remarks that
co-ops inflict no group pressure on
the student to conform.
One of the most distinct advan-
tages of co-op living as Armstrong
sees it is the close contact and

friendly relations that inevitably
form among students with varied
cultural backgrounds. Foreign
students compose approximately
one third of the co-op member-
ship.
With so many roomers and
boarders, there are bound to be
some who shirk their duties. In
such a case, the Student is fined.
Luther Buchele, executive secre-
tary of I.C.C., admits that the "co-
operative" spirit sometimes fal-
ters, but the important thing is
the experience gained in working
out your own problems.

Each house has some sort of
governing body, but members find,
says Armstrong, that they must
take the initiative themselves to
organize any projects.
Women's co-operatives include
Muriel Lester, A. K. Stevens, Har-
old Osterweil House, and Mark
VIII Co-op. Freshman women may
not live .in these independent co-
ops.
Men may choose among John
Nakamura, Robert Owen or Michi-
gan Co-ops. Louis Brandeis House
is an apartment co-op for mar-

Tied students, housing seven fan
ilies.
in the women's co-ops, how
directors, whom the women heb
select, and students find a warm
personal relationship. Althoug
these co-ops are under the regulh
tions of the Women's Judiciary,
more lenient, less rigid enforce
ment of rules is possible becaus
of the small size of the units. Hen
again, members are more inde
pendent and less subject to a bu
reaucratic existence.
In the future, Armstrong hope
to see the I.C.C. houses becom
more integrated into campus life

MAKING PLANS for the second co-ed production of Soph Show,
Amy Morrow, Nancy Moore, Alan Nachman, Harvey Katz, Toby
Stern and Irwin Gage are eager to start work on "Girl Crazy."
Sophomore Class Sets
Falf Musical Comedy

i
_

By ROBERTA SOFFIN

e

Encouraged by the success of
last year's Soph Show, the Sopho-
more class will continue the new
co-ed production . this year with
"Girl Crazy" a musical comedy by
George and Ira Gershwin.
"Good News", put on last fall,
was the first sophomore class pro-
duction that combined the talents
of both men and women class
members.
Created to rouse class spirit, the
project encourages co-educational
cooperation and offers students a
background of experience in hold-
ing responsible positions, say gen-
eral co-chairmen Adrienne Rich-
ards and Lawrence Velvel.
Features Familiar Songs
"Girl Crazy", adapted from a
book by Guy- Balton and ,John
McGowan, will feature such fa-
miliar songs as "I've Got Rhythm"
"Biding My Time," "Embraceable
You," "But Not for Me," "Sam-
son and Delilah," and "Barbary.
Coast."
Revolving around a young man
who is sent West: because his
father wants to cure him of liquor
and women, the show is set in
Custerville, where there haven't
been any women for 30 years.
The young man proceeds to bring
the East to the West and makes his
dude ranch into a night club.
There are male-and- female come-
dy leads for prospective tryouts.
The show will also feature a full
orchestra.
Professional Direction
The. crew will be working under
direction of Ted Heusel, director of
the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre, who
assisted last year's group.
Show planning began last spring
after the central committee, head-
ed by co-chairmen Miss Richards
md Mr. Velvel, were chosen. Work-
ing with them are Marcia Keller
and Alan Nachman, who handle

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publicity. Direction will be handled
by Toby Stern and Bob Shaye.
Amy Morrow and Teague Jack-
son are chairmen of productions,
while Nancy Moore and Dave
Metzher head programs. Kathy
Deutsch and Miles Dylan are
dance chairmen, and Joan Koent-
zer and Irwin Gage ar music chair-
men.
Treasurers are Barbara Rosbe
and Keith Kussmaul, while Duffy
Engle and Jerry Weber are secre-
taries. Costume chairmen are Lois
Wurster and Martin Newman. Car-
ol Shapiro and Terry Thure will be
in charge of make-up.
Sub-committee chairmen include
Judy Gross and Dave Palm on
posters and Carol Buckner and
Ted Cohn on stunts. The stage
crew will be under the direction of
Hal Randelman and Lynn
Schoonmaker will be in charge of
props. Judy Caplan will handle
contacts.

i

Mass Meeting
The Central Committee has
scheduled a mass meeting for all
those who wish to try out for the
show or any of the various com-
mittees for 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 24, in the League.
During orientation week, stunts
for this meeting will be presented
on the Diagonal and at Water-
man Gym on League night. As in
other years, the show will be spon-
'sored by the League.
Eager to continue their plans
this fall, the Central Committee
promises "fun and experience for
all who participate. Whether in the
spotlight or working the spotlight,
there is an opportumity for every-
one to help make the show a suc-
cess," Miss Richards commented.
Three years ago, the sophomore
women presented Soph Cabaret,
a carnival affair at the League.
Soph Scandals, the next year, was
a gay musical staged again by
only sophomore women.

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As you walk across the Diag

have coffee in the Union .. .

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cttend your first fall

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sit in on a bridge hand at the League...

you find the campus is sparkling with
excitement-as old friends and new
greet the beginning of a fall semester.
So many things to do, so many places to go! You'll
want to be sure you have the right clothes for every

octivity.

Goodyear's extends a warm and friendly welcome to
you with new fall fashions for your casual campus look.
We have the nationally famous brand names you know
and trust. Be sure to come in soon to 124 S. Main Street.
We will be happy to be your fashion, home-away-from-

mixer .0.

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home.

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GOODYEAR'S . . . Serving stdents with pleasure since 1888.

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Old Friends To

Greet

You:

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"For BOZAK Speakers
it's AUDIO SUPPLY"

AUDIO SUPPLY Laboratories
214 South State (opposite Bob Marshall's Book Shop)
Normandy 2-7767
WELCOME TO THE CLASS OF 1961
AND ALL FORMER STUDENTS
VISIT US FOR ALL YOURj
NEEDED ACCESSORIES
* DRESSER SCARFS
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B BLANKETS
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We Also Have Wonderful Gift Items

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