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October 17, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-17

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ILX

ert Cites Group Starts

Young Democrats.

p t

ational Week

"t

urg will be the key-
for International
Ding to Robert Ar-
airman of the Inter-
'dinating Committee.

nday,

ed poet wrote the pre-
The Family 'of Man," a
shed- by the Museum of
rt in New York, which
ed as the theme for In-
I Week.
ature World's Fair
tured during the week,
from Nov. 4 to 9, will
beakers, discussions, and
s Fair."
)fs between American
gn students are being
r Nov. 5 to Niov. 9. The
3willtake the form of
irs, deserts or dinners.
to Arnove; all foreign
dents have been invited
;he disc'ussions given by
f the Assembly Associa-,
nhellenic Council.
.ans for men's discus-
s have not-yet been set
[ouse Council or Inter-
Council.
Roosevelt to Speak
ernational Coordinating'
also is attemptirg to
r speakers "to the Tni-
afternoon programs in,
according to Arnove.
ousy announced, Mrs.
oosevelt will speak at1
lay, Nov. 8 in Hill Audi-
press conference is
receding the speech.
on will host the Inter-
Students Association's

"World's Fair" Friday evening. A
variety show and cultural displays
will be presented by all the na-
tionality groups attending the
University.
Ball to Close Week
The Monte Carlo Ball will wind
up International Week on a light
note. To be held Saturday, Nov. 9,
the dance will feature a cabaret-
atmosphere of gambling and en-
tertainment. Red Johnston and
his band will provide the music.
The idea of having an Interna-
tional Week was conceived .last
year, according to Arnove, by the
International Coordinating Com-
mittee.
The aim of International Week
is to increase student awareness
of the University's international
role, and provide a basis for
further projects in the interna-
tional field.'
* *f
GIles To,:Give
Contcert Today,

Roman Era
Of Turmoil
By LEWIS COBURN
Roman politics in the senatorial
period lacked the. "pleasing sym-
metry of government and opposi-
tion' in the modern sense, Prof.
P*rank Adcock observed in the
fifth of this year's Thomas Spen-
cer Jerome lectures yesterday.
He noted that there was no true
"anti-senate" party in Rome dur-
ing the period, although at times
the senate's authority was chal-
lenged by small power coalitions
which obtained popular support.
Prof. Adcock said, speaking of
"The Age of Revolution," that Ti-
berius Gracchus opposed the pow-
er of the senate by proposing cer-
tain "agrarian reform" measures.
Tells of Tiberius
The senate emerged triumphant
from this early challenge. Prof.
Adcock noted, "Tiberius was killed
by aristocratic die-hards." How-
ever, the land reform was not an-
nulled, he said. .
Later, Gaius Gracchus chal-
lenged the senate, and Prof. Ad-
cock observed that the "senate
was overridden" for two years.
Prof. Adcock explained that
when popular support was with-
drawn, Gaius fell, but the British
scholar added . that senatorial
authority had been "shaken."

Sidney Giles, assistant Univ
sity carillonneur, will give a ca
Ion concert at 7:15 p.m. today fr
Burtori Tower.
.iles is giving the concerts wi
University carillonneur Perci
Price is on a tour of Europe.
Included in. tonight's progr
will be compositions by W. La
rence Curry, Kamiel Lefevere s
George Clement. Special arr~ni
ments for the carillon will inch
selections by Peter Benoit, J.'
Bach, Leo Delibes, and "Frf
Schubert.

er-
'om
hile
val
,am

Honors Plan
In Lit School
(Continued from Page 1)
their performance in the literary
college has been excellent, that is,
about a 3.5 average.
Study Sophomore Year
The Council and a sub-com-
mittee set up by the council are'
now working on the program to be
offered students in the second
year.
We expect to offer students dur-
ing their sophomore year even
more challenging opportunities
than they are now getting," Prof.
Angell noted. These opportunities
may include tutorial work and
special courses for honors stu-
-dents, he continued.
Another problem now facing
the council is how to separate to
make the ,honors students. The
council would like to give the stu-
dents some prestige, Prof. Angell
said, but not go as far as making
them an "egg-head" group.
Suggests Reading toom
One suggestion which has been
brought up is that of establish-
ing a special reading room for.
honors students. Another is giving
them a distinctive title other than
"honors student." The council
will take up such questions at its
next meeting.
The present .honors program is
in effect at upper class levels in
most departments. Economics,
which is not primarily a fresh-
man course, ,has not set up an
honors section. The English de-
partment has for many years had
its own honors sections in the be-
gining courses.
Beginning foreign language
classes have not established hon-
ors sections since it was felt that
many students who do well in
their courses have trouble with
language courses. Thus the hon-
ors section will be established for
second semester courses only.
Departments will be urged to
suggest to students !that they en-
ter the honors sections if they
have shown the required excel-
lence in their first semester col-
lege work. Probably about one
quarter of the students in the col-
lege will thus take_ at least one
honors course, he noted.
Organization of special sections
is now difficult because so few are
in the program, Prof. Angell ex-
plained. When the honors pro--,
gram has developed toits fullest,
there .may be about 1,200 students
in the literary college program, he
noted.

University Young Democrats arev
planning to send a delegation to
the national YD convention in
Nevada next month, corresponding
secretary Ron Pivnick, '69L, said
yesterday.
Top Democratic leaders includ-
ing Michigan's Gov. G. Mennen
Williams, national chairman Paul
Butler and former President Harry
Truman are-expected to be at the
convention, Pivnick said,
The gathering will be held Nov.
7, 8 and 9 in Reno. The trip, which
Pivnick said is open to any stu-
dent, will cost about $114 round
trip.
What to, do with the Southern
element of the Democratic party
in light of the Little Rock incident
fitaian iMusic
To Be Heard
A string orchestra conducted by
Gilbert Ross- will present Italian
Music of the 17th and 18th cen-
turies at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Included in the program will be
selections by Corelli, Pergolesi, and
Vivaldi.
DIAL NO 8-6416
Week Nights at 7 & 9 P.M.
. ..NOW'..
"ZANY... HILARIOUS!"
--Herald Tribune
"FRESH . . . WITTY!"
-Sat. Review
. x'
-* .". ...{"::; .: .;. .:..-:
'
sarea fld . I~
written and oirected by PKSION S! T CS
*"uYt NIm"E M.a' MCl " A MINA NSEL4L
. . . Next . .
"FRUITS of
SUMMER"
eNam W

,t

Quads Pass
Hi-Fi Rules
Jack Hale, Senior Resident Di-
rector of the Men's Residence.
Halls, yesterday announced restric-
tions for hi-fidelity. phonograph
playing before Saturday football
games.,
Hale explained that the South
Quadrangle Council passed a reso-
lution prohibiting the broadcasting
of record music from the windows
of the quadrangle on Saturday'
mornings.
WestQuadrangle restrictions
are similar to those in South Quad
specifying that -the music note be
blaring from the windows.
DIAL NO 2-3136
. . NOW. ..
Heln Morgan-
her songs-
r, EM,

will be a major topic of discussion,
Pivnik said. Seminar groups with
other college students are planned.
Arrangements are being made by
Pivnik at NO 2-0968.

SUBSCRIPTION EDITOR
GARGOYLE
420 Maynard Street
Student Publications Building'

aw- Corruption Increased
nd -,-Toward the end of the revolu-
e tionaryage, Prof. Adcock noted,
Lide increased corruption was evi-
S. denced in Roman government. He
anz observed that by this time the
"live and let live" attitude of the
senatorial period had passed.
Prof. Adcock then described a
succession of Roman revolutions,
beginning with Sulla and ending
with- Octavius, during which
Rome passed"under the :rule of.
various dictators and two "trium-
virates.",
Julius Caesar, a member of the'
first triumvirate, later became
dictator of Rome. Prof. Adcock
said that the "murder of Caesar
created more problems than it
solved.",
Vhe close of the Octavian Era
brought with it "at the least, a
new deal," Prof. Adcock con-
cluded.
Concluding this year's lectures,
on Monday, Prof. Adcock. will
speak on "Augustus° Princeps,"
and on Tuesday "The Develop
, ment of the Principate."

Chem
Tonight at. 7 c
Friday at 7 a
I
IN C
Wi*
H UMPHRE
JOSEF
VAN JO
Saturday at 7
Sunday a
1N C
Wil
LAWRENC
JEAN SI
ARCHITECTURE
54 c

To Attend Convention,

FRIDAY, OCTOBER ]8@® 8:20 P.M.
CORNELL and PRASS Present
LARimEN AAA..
C. , and componr of
DANCERS SINGERS MUSICIANS
featuringY
a STheBICA ard'sreated°
osFlamenco Guitarist
'This human Vesuvius smoldered, flamed
and exploded her way through the most
exciting evening of dance that this city
has soon," H -New, Yorkr Herald Tribune.
} SEATS NOW ON SALE
al Grinnell's 9 Masonic Tmple
PRICESt Main Floor 3.30, 2.75; Balcony 2.75,2.20, 1.65 (tax i

4UTIN'
OLOR
ith
Y BOGART
ERRER
HNSON

-qdil..d--M
nd 9:10 P.M.

H E

Fre e+

:5-

and 9:45 P.M.
i 8P.M.
4 L ET"
OLOR
t h
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MMONS

(If Female)

$1.00 for one year (4 issiues)
ion to Gargoyle
t Haste to the above address

* ANN BLYTH
PAUL NEWMAN
..Added
Special to coincide with the
Royal visit to this country.
We pre'sent highlights in the
life of - -
"QUEEN
ELIZABETH II

r

Senator
BRICKER
icon. Ohio

U.S. Senator
A LERT GORE
"Democrat, Tenn.

MEMBERS CONGRESSIONAL
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMITTEE
in a Bipartisan Discussion,
"Can Atomic Energy
Be Controlled ?'
TUESDAY, \OCT. 22
8:30 P.M.
,
Tickets now on sale
$1.50-$1.00-50c

Mitchell Talks
On Hamilton
Prof. Broadus Mitchell of Rut-
gersState University today will
deliver the first -of two lectures
here commemorating the 200th
anniversaryof = Alexander.Hamil-
The lecture is, scheduled at 4:15
pm. in Auditorium A, Angell Hanl.
He will speak on "The-Alexander
Hamilton Nobody Knows.
Prof. Mitchell is a noted eco-.
nomic historian and has recently
had published the firstof a. two-,
volume series on Hamilton's life.
The lectures here are part of a
nation-wide observance of Hamil-
ton's bicentennial.
The second lecture will be given
Nov. 7 by Prof. Harold C. Syrett of
Columbia University. Prof. Cyrett
Is preparing for publication a new
and definite edition of Hamilton's
papers.

AUDITORIUM
ents

TODAY }. DIAL
through Saturday NO 2-251
A Double Rendezvous With Roman
Two Classics on One Program!
'tAOST REFRESHING EqcApADr R
ESDOW TARS
OROMlE EVER
aye' b (OWN ON I

' ' ";i
ra 'y.
; Ile
rrY..
v
r r

. of M. Lecture Course... HILL AUDITORIUM

GREGORY
PECK-
as the American newspaperman
AUDREY
HEPBURN
as the runaway princess

rt0 . '' YX
iO 66' a o e(Cwi

WI1LAM WYLER'S
PRODUCTION OF

EDDIE ALBERT

I

SHOWN DAILY AT
-2:45 6:40 10:00

l

i

AND *
COMBINING THE EXCITING TALENTS OF
PFT TR A CA TkfVAWD TADN rT %TryD c t

Weekdays ... 11 A.M. to 6:30 P.M.
Saturday... 11 A.M. to 12 midnight
Sunday .. 1 P.M. to 12 midnight

rv J AII YLaULL AWARD WhINNERSf
HUMPHREY BOGART
Academy Award winner for "The African Queen"
AUDREY HEPBURN
Academy Award winner for"Roman Holiday"
WILLIAM HOLDEN'
Academy Award winner for "Stalag 17"

e

r

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lights, alley, spotters, benches, air conditioning -
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