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October 11, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)R YE,

tBROAD:

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1(

J.S., Jessel Says

Steering Committee
Investigates Six Plans

using

nthe!
, Is-

Talk Given
By Hubbard

11

ity in the
his book
acle, his
>pearance

'TV may be a
mechanism bt
a step forwar

the,

aIr

. 11

8
ai

' " .

in is,

f night life
e the death
ns. "If kids
s they can't
s, or any-

-Daily-Norman Jacobs
MASTER COMEDIAN-Before his appearance in Hill Auditorium
yesterday, George Jessel commented that although TV is an
advance in mechanism it is not a step forward in civilization. It
results in less adult conversation and the death of the theatre in
the United States.

think kids' even play in
tore. Instead of playing
id healthy snow, moth-
y might catch cold and
stay in and watch TV,"
nedian finds that the,
of TV shows has
do with the public. "An
tf told 'to get a show
public will enjoy but
that will please the
or get fired."
summer stock does
heatre, the master of
Adcock
ive Tale
ink E. Adc.ock will de-
second of the current
homas Spencer Jerome
iRoman Political Ideas
ce at 9 a.'m. today in
gell Hall.
ject of Prof. Adcock's
,be the "Growthof the
ed by jnany in the field
forerfnost living inter-
Roman history, Prof.
died at King's College,
and in Berlin and
the seventh annual
erome lectures on ,an-
ry. The lectures will
livered at the Ameri-
ny in Rome.
yanization
Notices
is columnn for announce-
etings is available to .of-
nized and registered stu-
atinns only. For the cur-
er organizations should
later than October 11.)
r a *

word-weaving' and ad-libbing
said. He compares it'to the minor
leagues in baseball - if it goes
out there will be nothing to bring
up new talent.
Toastmaster General
Named "Toastmaster General
of the United'.States" by former
President Harry S. Truman, Jes-
sel's theatrical career began. at
the age' of nine in the Imperial
Theatre in New York. He ap-
peared with Walter Winchell and
Eddie Cantor during his first
years, singing and telling jokes.
During his almost half cen-
tury in the entertainment world,
Jessel has appeared in every me-
dia of entertainment except bur-
lesque and the circus.
His only other appearance at
the -University was during his
vaudeville days in 1914.,
Collects Religious Books

which transpires in your mind
exists. I don't condemn or chal-
lenge anyone for their beliefs.
"I am Jewish and my daughter
is half Jewish and half Gentile. If
she believes in the divinity of
Christ I wouldn't want to take
that away from her, srhe said.
Represents Israel
Jesse] is currently making
speeches as arepresentative of
the State of Israel to sell bonds.
He also makes speeches' for the
benefit of the City of Hope Hos-
pital in California.
He plans to return to the Holy
Land early next summer where he
is working to rewrite the Israeli
national anthem. After return-
ing to the United States, he will
finish his novel, "Empty Side of
the Bed."
PoetryGroup
flolds Contest
The National Poetry Associa-
tion announces its annual com-
petition open to students, teach-
ers and librarians.
Any t.eacher, librarian or stu-
dent attending either junior or
senior college, ,is eligible to sub-
mit verse. Although there is no
limitation as to form or theme,
shorter works are preferred by the
judges because of space limita-
tions.
The closing date, for the sub-
mission of poetry by students is
November fifth, for teachers and;
librarians, January first.

(Continued from Page 1)
Students live with German fam-
ilies and receive a Continental
breakfast and dinner in the home.
Lunches are usually purchased out.
Smith College offers the junior
year program at the University
of Paris, the University of Flor-
ence, and the University of Madrid
for language majors, and at the
University of Geneva for students
in economics, government, history
and sociology.
Language proficiency is neces-
sary. Tuition and room and board
total $1900 for the year, but travel
is extra.
Sweet Briar College, the Univer-
sity -of Maryland, and Rosary Col-
lege all offer programs similar to
Smith's. Rosary's program costs
$1300 for tuition and room 'and
board, exclusive of travel fees.
Filled Need
Hamilton College set up its for-
eign study program in 1956 for
guidance "rather, than see many
candidates go abroad unsponsored
and be subject 'to ineffectual su-
pervision and limited variety of
courses ..."
Its catalog explains, "The Ha-
milton Junior-Year has attempted
to solve the questions of guidance,
examinations, linguistic problems,
transfer of credits, etc."
For the year's study at the Uni-
versity of Paris it has set.up what
the brochure calls "distinctive
features." These include direction
of the group in France by members
of the college French department,
who help maintain "close contact.
with the College."
Enrollment Limited
The enrollment is limited to
those who will "profit most" from
the program, teachers-to-be and
future government career men.
The preliminary session of in
tensive language drill, initiation
to the French educational system
and to French life is held at Biar-
ritz for six weeks 'previous to en-
rollnient at the University of Paris.
The course carries six hours'credit.
At least 12 hours credit must be
carried each semester. These must
include three hours each semester
of each of the following: French
grammar and language, phonetics,
French history and civilization,
and French literature.
Use French Grading
Examinations are given at the
en& of the preliminary session,
and at the close of each semester,
with short exams during the year.
Grading is done in the French
system, with points being given in
each course from :0 to 20, and
these grades are in turn changed
into the Hamilton equivalent.
Costs, including the trip 'to,
France, tuition, room and board,,
amount to $2200 for the year.
Travel arrangements are made by
the college.
Investigate Plans
Under p r e s e nt University of
Michigan policy, students cannot

Fraternity
Suspended

study abroad and receive credit
here unless they are on one of the
six approved programs.
With an increasing num r of
students wishing to spend their
junior year in Europe, the steering
committee is looking into two
possible plans which the Univer-
sity might establish.
One would be a program where
students would study at a univer-
sity in England, thus eliminating
the language requirement.
The other plan would be a fac-
ulty exchange program with Euro-
pean universities, whereby Uni-
versity professors would teach and
set up courses at European schools.

"Discrimination in Housing"
was the general topic of a speech
given by De Hart Hubbard Wed-
nesday evening at the Friends'
Center.
Hubbard is Racial-Relations
Officer of the Federal Housing
Administration. He is a graduate
of the University and a formbr
member of the United States
Olympic team. .

IVA KITCHELI
Dance Comedienne
at
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEAT
Tuesday, Oct. 15, 8:30 P.M.
BOX OFFICE OPEN 10
Balcony 2.75, 2.20, 1.65 "Bea Lilie
Main Floor 2.75, 2.20 Anna Russell rolle
tax incl. gether."
-Washington

Alpha Chi, an unaffiliated Uni-
versity of .Detroit fraternity, was
suspended recently for failing to
observe university policies.
Rev. Celestin Steiner, U. of D.
president, expelled the 20-member
fraternity "for continuing and ser-
ious violation over a six-month
period of university policies."
A planned party at which alco-
holic beverages were to be served
brought on the suspension. U. of D.
forbids ' alcohol at any campus
party.

The speech was co-sponsored by
the local chapter of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People and the Uni-
versity NAACP group.
Hubbard related a number of
his experiences in his position
with the FHA; as well as explain-
ing many of the .federal laws
whichbarehintended to provide
equitable housing facilities for
minority groups.
He outlined the procedure for
minority groups wishing to get
FHA loans after' being refused by
local lending agencies, and also
discussed the FHA attitude to-
ward discrimination in housing.
Hubbard said that develop-
ments whose loans are insureq by
the federal government, or who
are receiving FHA funds must
rent their dwellings without re-
gard to race, religion or cultural
background. He cited Ann Arbor's
current redevelopment program
as a prime example of this.

A New Adventure in Religious Expression
SHIdLaL RELIGIOUS WORKSHOP
Friday, October 11th - 3:30

Citepsa quild
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 P.M.
"FULL' OF LIFE'
with
RICHARD CONTE
JUDY HOLLIDAY
also
"Segregation in Our Schools"
Saturday at 7 and 9 P.M.
Sunday at 8 P.M.
"GENTLEMEN'S
AGREEM ENT"
GREGORY PECK
DOROTHY McGUIRE
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Bil Street

Cantors

Readers

;.
.:..

.

=4

Since his appearance in ."Jazz
Singer" Jessel has been deeply
interested in religious books and
now has one of the largest collec-
tions of such books of any lay-
man in the country. "I have any-
thing that has ever been written
on religion that makes sense,' he
claims.
While appearing in the "Jazz
Singer," a religious play, I was
called upon to speak in temples:
and churches and became fascin-
ated by the subject," he explained.
Jessel has had no formal educa-
tion since he was eight years old
and no religious upbringing.
He has been studying religious
books since 1927 and has visited
the Holy Land five Aimes. "I have
been on every inch of soil that
has to' do with Christianity and
Judaism," he said.
Jessel believes that "only that

E LIG IBL E TO JOI N
DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nights
" *!*Members and Guests
FLOOR SHOW TONIGHT
Mary Lou
314 EAST LIBERTY
I ~Air. Conditioned

1

r,

III

. .

tI

pIzz

at its

Ane~t!

and Disciples Guild,
11, 7:00 p.m., Guild
mpson. Guildersat-
ly organize at Guild

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ENDING TQDAY
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1,

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SOP AI
XPp~

in STANLEY KRAMERS
MONUMENTAL FILMING OF
': IM EPAS~xoi
TECHNICOLOR' VISTAVISION'
Starts SATURDAY

Operations Research
is a challenging new field in which research ranges
over every known area of science, to produce answers
to immediate questions, solutions for long-range
problems. Technical Operations, Incorporated, of
Burlington, Massachusetts, now engaged in such re-
search in cooperation with the Continental Army
Command at Fort Monroe, Virginia, and at Monterey,
California, is looking for 'the right scientists and
engineers in all fields ...
andYOUas a TECHNICAL GRADUA TE
should know more about how tech/ops can offer you
.broadening contact with many varied scientific dis-
ciplines, good living conditions, salary policies that
mean growth and recognition, all usual benefits, and
creative freedom/to think, in a growing research and
development organization.
See Our Representatives:
IC. S. ANDERSON, at the Placement Office, College
of Engineering, 347 West Engineering Building, Oc-
tober 16 .. . at the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Building, October 17.

HOWARD HUGHES'
HN WAYNE JANET LEIGH
U. S. AIR FORCE
TECHNICOLOR
... Next Attraction ...
:10 to Yuma.'

4

... BETTER THAN ANYTHING
BEFORE!"-Crowther, N.Y. Times

HERO' IS TERRIFIC
SORT EVER DONEI

write to: K. S. ANDERSSON
Combat Operations Research Group
Continental Army Command
'Fort Monroe, Virginia

= w7 s ,)

~x./i 'p

. : .. . .. .. .

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