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October 06, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-06

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Tinn

MlCMGAN DAIT

-Food Output Increases With Fewer Workers,

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Tuesday

(4)

. Frances Greer of the School
isic will present a public
at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Mendelssohn Theater.
s Greer will' open the pro-
with "Balmy Sweetness Ever
ig" by Boyce, "The Maid's
ition" by Leveridge; "Al de-
y Mozart and a group of
"Chansons de Belitis" by
sy.
program will be concluded
'I Am Like a Remnant of A
of Autumn," by Carpenter,
wade" by Nordoff, "Go 'Way
My Window" arranged by
"Gray Velvet" by Mopper,
Sleigh" by Kountz, and "Cin-
iciones Populares Argentinas
nastera."

UNITED NATIONS, N. Y, (w)-
The world is using more land, more
tractors and more fertilizers -to
produce more and more food with
less and less farm workers.
Its food production is growing'
faster than Its population, but
some countries are much better
supplied with food than others,I
and in many people are still un-
derfed.
This is the picture presented by
recent publication of the United
Nations and its specialized agency,
the Food and Agriculture Organi-
zation in Rome.
Secretary General Concludes
In his "Report on the World
Social Situation," UN Secretary
General Dag Hammarskjold con-
cludes that the world's farms and
fisheries can keep on producing
more and more. He says the best

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way to see that they do is by cut-
ting food prices and raising poor
people's income.
In its 1956 yearbook of food and
agriculture statistics, just issued,
the FAO shows that the propor-
tion of the world's population liv-
ing off agriculture slipped from 63
per cent before World War II
(1937) to 39 per cent afterward
(1950). The whole population grew
from 2,136,000,000 to 2,504,000,000,
the agricultural population only
from 1,346,000,000 to 1,477,000,000.
Meanwhile, however, the number
of tractors used in agriculture rose
from 2,590,000 (1938-39 crop year)
to 6.656,000 (1949-52) and since
has risen to 9,157,000 (1955).
More Tractors Needed
With more tractors, farmers
could work more land. Bydrain-
age, clearing, irrigation and culti-
vation, more land was brought
into production. The FAO now
estimates that land that is arable
or in tree crops totals 3,383,900,000
acres. Last year its estimate was
3,339,440,000 acres.
Fertilizers made the land more
productive. Between 1938 and 1956,
the world (outside the Soviet
Union) boosted its consumption of
commercial nitrogenous fertilizers
from two and one-half million to
6,300,000 metric tons; of commer-
cial phosphoric acid from 3,600,000
to 7,300,000 metric tons, and of
commercial potash fertilizers from
2,600,000 to 6,100,000 metric tons.
More land plus higher produc-
tivity meant much more produc-
tion. Hammarskjold's report esti-
mates that of the increase in grain
output between 1948-50 and 1952-
54, about two-thirds was due to
enlarged.acreage in grain and the
rest to higher yields per acre. The
world area in grain outside the
Soviet Union grew during that
time from 103.1 per cent to 108.3
per cent of prewar 1934-38, while
the yield per acre grew from 105.9
to 108.5 per cent of the prewar
level.
Production Inrceases
Overall world food production
grew from 110 (1948-1949) to 126
(1955-56) per cent of prewar.
But population grew too-some
places faster than food produc-
tion. So even in 1955-56, per capita
food production was only 92 per
cent of prewar in the Far East
(excluding China), 93 per cent in
Oceania and 94 per cent in Latin
America. It was 106 per cent of
prewar in the Near -East and Af-
rica, 109 per cent in Western Eu-
rope and 121 per cent in North
America.
In the world as a whole, per cap-
ita food output rose from 96 per
cent of prewar in the 1948-49
period to 104 per cent of prewar
in the 1955-56, crop year.
Population, Too
Hammarskjold says world popu-
lation is going up about one and
one-half per cent a year and world
food production about two and
one-half per cent a year.
However, he notes that there
are vast differences among coun-
tries and regions. In the Far East,
agricultural production is rising
two per cent a year and popula-
tion only one and one-fourth per
cent. In Latin America, on the
other hand, population is rising
faster than food production-2.4
per cent against 2.2 per cent.
The accompanying presents fig-
ures from 38 countries and terri-
tories showing that in the postwar
era, the supply of calorie (heat)

food value per person per day falls
short of estimated requirements in
16 of these areas.
Supplies Must Increase
To feed the world's population
at current consumption levels 25
years from now, Hammarskjold
says, the world's grain supplies
must go up 43 per cent; for better,
feetin gin impoverished regions,
the Far East's grain supplies must
go up 80 per cent .and Latin
America's 45 per cent.
"Technical obstacles to a further
expansion of output! and to higher
efficiency in farms and fisheries
production are not insuperable,"
he says, but such expansion must
be planned and promoted "if satis-
actory food standards are to be
reached in future years."
Hammraskjold adds, however,
that unless there is "a steadily ex-
panding effective demand for
food," unwieldy surpluses may en-
danger world markets, trade in
food. stagnate and production be
cut back in the most productive
countries.
"The main emphasis for the im-
mediate years ahead must be on
ways to raise this demand," he
concludes.

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lop 11IFqRV go T4, .
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calories above normal a Cogmft'fes t oV A miinimum dai4y calorie I:uirezenfs
-aC'l 0 equals .00 " ar jCountries below minimum daily calorie requirements 0
caloriesbelow normal w -h/ PLP'
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'NANNANA

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PERCENTAGE Of TOTAL POPULATION
ENGAGED IN AGRICULTURE
aM/OT LATIN AS/A AFRIC,4
MERI/C AA'rER/IC A (FrcrNn4
PERCENTAGE INCREASE OR DECLINE IN CER
+ .YIELDS PER ACRE IN PAST 20 YEAR-

Greene's Ideas on Achieving Cleanliness:

NUMBER 2 IN A SERIES

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TOTE 'EM

Fashion decrees an elongated figure... beautifully.
carried out in this wool jersey sheath . ,. . featuring
the newest fashion of a11, the shirred stovepipe neck.
Sizes 5-15 $17.95

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TO GREENE'S

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217 South Main.

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9 Nickels Arcade

The Algonqu ans may have pounded their clothes
on rocks to get 'em clean - but you can picture
hammering away at your best cashmeres
on the banks of the Huron? Lucky you-you don't
have to! Totem poles may ward offf evil spirits-
but Greene's special care is the best way
to ward off the evil of slovenliness. Everything-
from cashmeres to coats, blue cords
to dinner jackets - is gently, thoroughly

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BUY .
UN
VARSITY

-Nizoo*lw

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"Microcleaned" in Greene's own plant.

The South U. Store even features'Self-service now
o help late sleepers get to class on time.
Rely upon Greene's for complete assistance

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in the cleaning, shirt- ard
rough-dry-laundry department.

4

TICKET
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No one cleans

Like good old Greene's

Daily pick up at quads and dorms.
Sororities and fraternities call.

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