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September 16, 1957 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1957

Reidnc OPINIONS VARY: h eals-
"Frs BOZAK Speakers Fraternities' Traditions Rs Halls
it's AUDIO SUPPLY" Twrn Of 1Year-Long E

- Scenes
mitemen

By DAVID TARR
An increase in room and board
rates, a food riot and planning for
the doubling-up of men's rooms
this fall were top news in the Uni-
versity's Residence Hall system last
year.
For the third consecutive year,
dormitory rates went up - $12.50
per semester for the coming year.
The Board of Governors said the
additional money is needed:
1) To increase the salary budget'
for regular Residence Hall em-
ployees.
2) To enlarge the dormitory food
budget.
3) To increase the hourly pay of

-Daily-Richard Bloss
STUDENTS AT WORK--Already in use, the new Activities
Building provides offices for 80 student organizations.
Activities Bldg. Read
For Firs t Year's Usag e

(Continued from Page 1)

Here Ellen Austin not only keeps
track of who is where and doing
what in the building, but also
handles such miscellany as stu-
dent bike licenses, which are ap-
plied for at her desk.
The basement of the building
contains such extras as a work-
shop, where organizations can put
together their displays for various
campus events, a sewing room and
a "kitchen" for employes and staff
of the building.
In addition, a ticket office is lo-
cated in the basement. Here stu-
dents may purchase tickets for
campus events such as the Lecture
series and May Festival.
Four years were required to
complete the SAB. The building
was begun in late 1953 when a
group of 13 student leaders got
together. This committee started
considering what students' needs
would be in such a building.
Led by Harry Lunn, '54, former
Daily managing editor, and Bob
Neary, '54, former Student Legis-
lature president, the group sent
out questionnaires to student or-
ganizations, asking them about
space requirements.

When these needs had been as-
certained, the groups prepared a
written plan for the University
Regents in 1954.
After the Regents accepted this
plan, detailed work with the archi-
tects was necessary to carry out
the project. This was completed
by February, 1957, and the build-
ing was opened.
The SAB's modern architecture
includes a number of unusual
features, such as the aluminum
louvers on the windows, which Te-
duce sunlight entering the build-
ing, often a problem with build-
ings consisting of a great percent-
age of glass.
The aluminum canopy is also
unique on the University campus.
Blank 'Walls have been placed
facing toward the north on the
end of each wing, thus allowing
for future expansion into a pos-
sibly U-shaped -building, when and
if the need develops for still more
room.
Pending that expansion, how-
ever, plans are being carried out to
landscape the area north of the
building, between it and the Stu-
dent Publications Building. This
landscaping is being completed as
a gift of the Class of 1957.

students employed by the Resi-
dence Halls.
Rates Up
The increase will bring the rate
for a double room to $795 for the
academic year.
Additional bad news for students
in Residences Halls came with an-
nouncement that some men's
rooms will be doubled-up for the
1957-58 year.
Women, who have been dou-
bling-up since the, 1952-53 year,
will have to handle even more
students next year, it was also an-
nounced. The doubling-up of men
is the first since the bulge of
veterans in the late 1940's.
University officials emphasized
the crowding of men will be only
for next year. They said the im-
mediate pressure will be relieved
with the completion of a new
women's dormitory in the fall of
1958.
Section Reclaimed
Completion of that building will
enable the men to reclaim part of
one quadrangle that was converted
for use by women' during an ex-
treme housing shortage several
.years ago.
The men's system will have to
house approximately 400 addi-
tional students, according to Uni-
versity officials. The increase in
the women's system is expected to
be around 200.
Completion of the new dormitory
is not expected to relieve the pres-
sure on the women's system very
much.
The other event, one that shot
the University into headlines
around the country, came in De-
cember when several hundred resi-
dents of two men's dormitories de-
cided the food wasn't as good as it
should be and indicated their dis-
pleasure by staging a demonstra-
tion.
Participation Small
It was relatively smail, probably
not exteeding 500 participants at
any given time, in light of reports
of several thousand rioters, and
caused no physical damage. Most
of the reported "rioters" were stu-
dents milling around watching.
Newspapers across the country,

however, carried wild reports
about dishes being smashed and
food being thrown against the
walls in a spectacular demonstra-
tion.
Food quality improvd some
after the demonstration but a sub-
stantial change was precluded by
a static food budget.
The Residence Hall s y s t e n
houses approximately 6,500 stu-
dents in buildings around the cam-
pus. ,
All freshmen are required to live
in the dormitories and can remain
during all of their 'undergraduate
years. Only graduate students on
dormitory staff and medical stu-
dents can live in dormitories, how-
ever.
Life Reflected
The system reflects, in most
ways, the life of the entire Univer-
sity. As one administrator said,
"Everything that is happening at
the University is reflected in, the
Residence Halls."
Size of women's halls range from
118 to more than 500. This will go
up to.1,200 with the completion of
the new dormitory in 1958.
Most of the women are housed -
in a group of buildings on what is
known as the "Hill." In this group
Stockwell Hall houses 500, Couzens
550, Alice Lloyd 500, and Mosher-
Jordan, 500.
Elsewhere around campus wom-
en's housing includes Victor ,
Vaughn, with a capacity of slightly
under 200, Betsy Barbour and
Helen Newberry each holding ap-
proximately 120, Martha Cook, 150.
Barbour and Cook are for upper-
classwomen.
Men are housed in three build-
ings: East, West and South Quad-
rangles. South houses 1,200 resi-
dents, West 1,000 and East 1,100,
of which 200 are women.
Women are also' housed in sev-
eral co - operatives and League
Houses around campus, all under
100 in capacity.
DORMS:
IHC Leads
Quadrtangle
Houses'
(Continued from Page 1)
exists to give the men of the Resi-
dence Halls service, coordination
and representation.
Services Listed
Service in the form-of programs:
athletic, social, cultural and educa-
tional; coordination between resi-
dents, Houses and Quadrangles;
and representation to the Univer-
sity administration, other campus
student governments, the faculty,
the community and the camas at
large.
This year thprganization estab-
lished several studies that will
culminate next year. It continued,
in cooperation with the Inter-fra-
ternity Council, the rushing study
program.
It played an important part in
the planning of a new dormitory
for North Campus and conducted
a study of the food problem as
revealed in a December protest
demonstration.
The newly-elected president of
IHC said next year "will show how
much IHC can do to help the
House and the man." What efforts
will be made has already been indi-
cated.
Government Stronger
The organitation will attempt to
build a stronger Residence Hall
student-governmental system by
interpreting the philosophy for
House governments.
On a more tangible level, IHC
will continue to develop its orienta-

tion program, with the Houses to
assist them in acquainting new
students with the University.,
Guest speaker programs for the
Houses will be pushed and a plan
for inter-House debating teams,
approved by IHC this year, will be
put into operation. An IHC news-.
paper is being developed and is
expected to be published in. the
fall.
IHC, in cooperation with the stu-
dent government of independent
women, Assembly Dormitory Coun-
cil, is planning a singing event,
similar to a popular singing com-
petition of affiliated houses.
Houses to Combine
Men's and women's Houses will
combine in groups of 20 and more
for the competition. There will also
be smaller ensembles, according to
present plans. The sing will prob-
ably, be in the fall.
In small, smoke-filled rooms
there will be study and discussion
by special committees of areas
vital to the future of Residence
Halls.
The rushing study will continue.
Another group will probe the
Michigan House Plan, the philo-
sophical basis around which Resi-
dence Halls are planned and oper-

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