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September 16, 1957 - Image 17

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

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x6, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

18, 1957 THE MICHIGAN B ATTN

PAGE

ELEVISION STUDIOS: WCBN Has
Kinescope Production Highlights Work Radio Work

I

UNIVERSITY RADIO STATION:
WUOM Offers Daily Listening, Practical Experier
WUOM-FM, the University radio

By JOAN KAATZ
A remodeled funeral parlor 10-
cated at 310 Maynard serves' as
the coordinating point for many
University television shows as well
as speech department productions
and WPAG-TV broadcasts.
Primary function of this office
is the filming of kinescope pro-
ductions sent to stations through-
out the state and nation.
Both students and faculty mem-
bers participate in live produc-
tions of these shows, filmed and
recorded and sent to stations re-
questing them.
Eight Shows Produced
Eight live shows. are coopera-
tively produced by the speech de-
partment, WPAG-TV, and Uni-
versity Television offices weekly.,
Speech students often get first-
hand experience in these produc-.
tions.
Seven years ago the University
first embarked on a television ad-
venture when WWJ-TV in De-
troit approached University offi-
cials with an offer of time on the
air for a University program.
The first program was launched
on Nov. 5, 1950 and originated,
from the Detroit studios.
The purpose of the program
was to, bring college-type courses
into the homes of persons unable
to attend college but wishing to
continue their education.
Kinescopes Produced
Essentially, this same purpose
is carried over today in the Uni-
versity's production of kinescope
films.
Included in these films are such
programs as "American Political
Parties", "Frontiers of Health"
and "Understanding Numbers."
In'January, 1954, the University
television offices moved from An-
gell Hall to their newly remodeled
studios on Maynard Street.
With this move kinescope pro-
duction really got started and
grew until today approximately
35 films are produced over 20
commercial stations weekly.
University telecasts on WPAG-
TV began in October, 1953, and
are produced by the University of-
fice in cooperation with the
speech department and the com-
mercial station. These telecasts
cover a variety of program types
for the basic purposes of program-
ming research and student train-
ing.

For Quads
WCBN, the Campus Broadcast-
ing Network, is the student-oper-
ated radio station broadcasting
from the' three men's Residence
Halls, East Quadrangle, South
Quadrangle, and West Quadrangle.
Each quadrangle station has its
own student staff headed by a
station manager and other offi-
cials. A function of Inter-House
Council, each studio is financed by
its quadrangle council, network
advertising revenue, and station
dues.
The activities of the three sta-
tions are coordinated at the net-
work office located in Rm. 2538,
Student Activities Building.
WCBN is a wired-radio system
which broadcasts directly through
the building's electrical system
rather than through the air. Pro-
grams can be heard in all three
quadrangles and Martha Cook and
Victor Vaughn dormitories.
Two projects of network expan-
sion now underway are the instal-
lation of transmitters in the'Wom-
en's Residence Hall area and pos-
sible placement of a station in the
new residence hall on North Cam-
pus.
Each station as well as the net-
work office holds an open house at
the beginning of the school year
to which new students are cordi-
ally invited. Every student who
joins the group is given a brief
tryout period and then put to
work. Any type of talent from
news announcing to engineering
ability is used.
Broadcast time from 7 a.m. to
1 a.m. is divided equally between
the three stations and carried by
the entire network. The programs
are primarily musical shows with
some coverage of special events,
such as SGC elections and hockey
games. .
The network has recently added+
a news bureau which will reportI
campus and community news in
addition to news received from
the Associated Press and the+
United Press.<

station, broadcasts from the fifth
floor of the Administration Bldg.
for approximately 10 hours a day.
WUOM presentations, along with
programs from its relay station
WFUM in Flint, is heard all over
the state of Michigan. Broadcasts
are of interest tf housewives, busi-
nessmen, college students, and ele-
mentary school children.
The programs are primarily mu-
sical with some news and sport
coverage and dramatic shows. Dur-
ing the fall WUOM broadcasts
many of the University football
games.
Students Employed
University students are employed
by the station but they do not re-
ceive course credit for their work.
Qualified students with some ra-
dio experience are employed to
produce strictly professional shows.
The speech department prepares
many of the broadcasts at WUOM
as part of the classwork, but par-
ticipants are generally regarded as
professional actors and announc-
ers. Several station personnel are
University graduates.
One of the most important ac-
tivities of the station is the serv-
ice it provides to rural school
areas through its "Festival of
Song." Radio singing teacher Miss
Edythe Mae Albert brings vocal
music instruction to Michigan ele-
mentary schools by way of this
broadcast.
Every spring the entire radio
group tours the state to conduct
"live" song festivals in cooperation
with school superintendents of
various communities.
NAEB Member
As a member of the National As-
sociation of Education Broadcast-
ers, the University station broad-
casts many programs from other
educational institutions in the
country. In return, University pro-
grams are heard throughout the
nation.
The station broadcasts programs
directly through its ultra-high fre-
quency transmitter atop the Ad-

-Daily-Norman Jacobs
TELEVISION STUDIOS-Prof. Garnet Garrison, director, helps
a cameraman obtain better focus (top) on one of several studio
cameras, then (bottom) helps to send out some of 40 kinescope
films distributed by the University weekly.

Courses Offered
The speech department offers
some 12 courses dealing with vari-
ous television techniques as well
as one course on radio and TV
news in cooperation with the jour-
nalism department.
Qualified students enrolled in
these courses receive on-the-air
laboratory experienpe while work-
ing on WPAG-TV broadcasts.
Other participants on these
telecasts include faculty, student
Prints Loaned
To Students
University students may rent a
variety of prints for the decora-
tion of their rooms from the Art
Print Loan Association of the
University.
For the modest fee of only 50
cents each, students may rent any
of 1,000 pictures, ranging' in motif
from old masters to contemporary
artists, from realism to abstract
cubism.
Offices of the Print Association
are located in the Student Activ-
ities Bldg. Semi-annual displays
allow the student to see and choose
the prints he wants to rent.

specialists, and community mem-
bers. Special video and audio cir-
cuits are installed between the,
television studio and the WPAG-
TV transmitter.1
The speech department does
some television work in studios
located on the fourth floor of An-
gell Hall. Closed circuit cameras
televise many speech laboratory
programs for classroom work.
Auditions Held
Auditions and interviews for
these jobs are held at the begin-
ning of the semester. Those re-
ceiving positions are given a
chance to obtain valuable tele-
vision experience in many fields.
This fall the University is plan-
ning closed circuit television ori-
ginating from the medical school
-an experimental project.
The television offices house ex-
tensive pieces of television equip-
ment. The University is one of the
few educational institutions to
own RCA optical recording equip-
ment for kinescope productions.
Although comparatively young
in the television field, the Univer-
sity has received many top
awards. Television here has been
honored by Variety magazine for

its education by television and
outstanding show management.
A special citation has been giv-
en by the Michigan State Feder-
ation of Women's Clubs.
While offering programs
through commercial stations the
University has also carried on a
continuing study of the needs, re-
quirements and opportunities in-
herent in the ownership and oper-
ation of its own television station.
University television facilities
have been installed and operated
with the approval of the Board
of Regents and Officers of the
University. Director of the tele-
vision offices is Prof. Garnet Gar-
rison of the speech department.
Policy supervision is by the Ex-
ecutive Committee on Broadcast-
ing.

--- .
An Interesting Shop -- with
gifts and home accessories to
satisfy every taste. Also, the
home of the famous Wedgwood
University of Michigan plates.
JOHN LEIDY
Phone NO 8-6779 * 601 East Liberty
ri4"

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-- --

II

'HILLEL
ORIENTATION
WEEK
Wednesday, Sept. 18.... 2:30-5 P.M.
NEWCOMERS "GET ACQUAINTED" - COKE HOUR
Friday, Sept. 20
SABBATH DINNER.. . 6:00 P.M.
WELCOME SERVICE - FOLLOWED BY
ONEG SHABBAT - 7:30 P.M.
Saturday, Sept. 21 ... 9:30 A. M.
SERVICES
Sunday, Sept. 22 ... 7-10 P.M.

locations
for your convenie nce:
MAIN OFFICE
CORNER OF MAIN & HURON STREETS
BRANCHES

330 SOUTH

STATE

1108 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

PACKARD

AT BROCKMAN

(With drive-in and Parking Facilities)
9571 N.MAIN STREET
Whitmore Lake, Mich.

III

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