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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iy To Present 'Marriage of Figaro'

,' '

Placement
Bureau Sets
Conference
Two meetings of seniors and
graduate students interested in
registering with the Bureau of
Appointments will be held, at 3
and 4 p.m. Tuesday in Auditorium
A, Angell Hall.
Prof. Glen Ludlow, director of
the Bureau of Appointments, em-
phasizes the benefits to be gained
by registering.
Attending one of the meetings
and filling out the forms pro-
vided will enable a student to stay
registered with the Bureau for the
rest of his life. This means, he
said, 'that a student will always
be able to return to the Bureau if
he later ,decides he is dissatisfied
with his job.
Want Record
Prof. Ludlow also noted that
companies much prefer each stu-
dent to have his academic, per-
sonal, and previous work record
before they meet with 'the stu-
dent. The Placement Bureau pro-
vides this as a free service.
The Bureau maintains files of
both business and schools. These
may be used by prospective em-
ployees to gain preliminary in-
formation about a company or
school.
What's Degree Good For?
He said that many people grad-
uate, from th? literary college
without too good ar idea of what
their degree enables them to do.
He mentioned as an example
graduates who had majored in
history.
If they don't want to teach, he
said, they or their professors are
not too sure for what a degree in
history is good. The Bureau can
tell them, for instance, that the
State Department is interested in
hiring history majors..
The Bureau has started a coun-
seling service where students in
doubt about their job plans may
discuss their problems with a
counselor.
Interviews willstart next week.

I
S

Rise Stevens Enjoys Coill

~Au

By DOROTHEA STEUDLE
When Rise Stevens walks on
stage and begins to sing, the
audience sees a poised operatic
rara avis with the stage presence
of the most experienced actress.
But when Rise waits in her
dressing room, it is a different
story. A bad case of .nerve pre-
cedes every performance. "No
matter how many times I've per-
formed, I just can't get over it,"
she admits.
"A college audience is the most
enthusiastic and also the most
critical," she explained. "Because
of this, opera singers consider
college audiences challenging and
stimulating."
Miss Stevens continued, "I hope
my 13-year-old son, Nicky, will
come to the University to study
law or something."
Will Retire
Confirming her statement that
she 'would retire from opera at
the age of 50, Miss Stevens ad-
mitted she might be coaxed to
sing at certain occasions. "But
definitely I'll retire," she said.
"Perhaps I can teach dramatics
here at the University, or better
yet, water-skiing, which I love,"
she laughed.
Besides her family, the opera
and water-skiing, Miss Stevens'
admits a. passion for cooking..
Born. in New York of Norwegian
and American parents, Miss Ste-
vens' special recipes which she
loves to share are flavored with'
Norwegian influence.
Begins Career
The story of her nusical career'
runs like . fairy taie. Miss Ste-
vens' career began at the age of
10 on a local radio program -
one of the early Milton Cross pro-
grans. At seventeen she was "dis-
covered" by Mme. Anna Schoen-
Rene as she sang the leading lady
role' with the Opera Comique in
New York.
Mme. Schoen-Rene offered to
teach. the young singer - an of-
fer which "materialized into a

'MOST CRITICAL':

in W mVgAgj
MOZART IN ENGLISH-NBC Opera Company will present, Wolfgang Mozart's "The Marriage of
O Fig'ro tomorrow night in Hill Auditorium. The much-traveled group. will present the German
lg master's work entirely in English, in concert form, as the first stop of its 55-city fall tour. Here
:f Count Almaviva (left) is shown bestowing favors upon his maid (kneeling).,

OPERA STAR-Rise Stevens sits in her dressing room aft
Ann Arbor performance Thursday evening. Replacing Lili
who is ill with Asian flu, Miss Stevens' repertoire included
operatic favorites.

a!

i

hat an
n con-

SRC REPORT=

on, Mac
e role of
I appear-

Study Shows Causes
Of Credit Increase

varguerite willauer.
Speech
ate Dept.
tative of the United
ttment of' State wil
day to discuss careen
in the Foreign Serv-
'ughran, a State De-
cer, will speak at 4
B at a general meet-
explain the Foreign
er selection process
general questions on
its will be arranged
ay for anyone inter-
aking to Loughran
ccording to Mildred
administrative assist-
Bureau of Appoint-
itments may be made
Bureau.
tment of State has
tat a Foreign Service
ination will be held
Applications for the
tt'en examination
eived by the Board of
. Washington before
est Civil Service ex-
mter where the test
is Detroit.
le to take the written
one must be between
rs old and have beer
he United States for

r An increase of almost 50 per,
cent in seven years in the num-
- ber of families -using consumer
credit is caused largely by the:'
greater willingness of consumers"
to use credit, according to a Sur-
vey Research Center Study.
In 1949, 38 per cent of Ameri-
can families used consumer cre-
dit; today, 54 per cent do, almost:
half as many, the study found.
From'60 to 75 per cent of the
d increase is laid to consumers' will-
l ingness to go into debt.
Th Attribute Increase
The remainder of the increase
is attributed to changes in the
number of families in groups
g which had used credit in large
- amount prior to 1949. These
changes are caused by such fac-
s tors as income, home ownership,
z liquid asset holdings - and the
number of young married couples.
The. study indicated that the
relationship between use of credit,
and home ownership or size of In-
come has not changed sulstan-
- tially in the past seven years and
that the percentage of families
owning homes or having a certain
income that used credit did, not
vary sizably in that period..
Income is the decisive factor in
the amount of credit used, once
a family decides to go into debt;.
This is because of the fact that'
income is the source out of which
monthly payments are made.
Use More Credit
t Decline in income also affected
the size of debt incurred in at
least one year, 1955. Significant-
ly more credit was used by fami-

lies with .declining incomes than
by those whose income remained
more or less stable.
This was explained by the fact
that consumer optirism was
greater in 1955 than in previous
years and more people had re-
cently experienced rises in in-
come.
Elect Tupper
To Heald, Staff
Prof. Charles M. Tupper of the
Medical School has been elected
chairman of University Hospital's
Junior Medical Advisory Staff for
1957-58.
Composed of clinical medical
doctors of the hospital holding
the ranks of instructor and assist-
ant professor, the Junior Advisory
Staff makes recommendations re-
garding patient care and treat-'
nent to the Senior Medical Advis-
ory Staff.

School Story,
Clippings Sent
Toofficial
Ann Arbor School Superinten-
dent Jack Elzay received 272
clippings of "Do School Pupils
Need Costly Palaces?" a recent
national magazine article.
Elzay said that he frequently
receives many clippings when ar-
ticles concerning public educa-
tion appear in national publica-
tions.
The article's author, Holman
Harvey, is critical of lavish
schools at a time when there is
a shortage of classroom space.
Harvey believes that towns are
being plunged Into debt for a gen-
eration to build these schools. In
many places, he said, school costs
take up more of the community's
total income than all other serv-
ices combined.
"While school funds are lav-
ished on facilities befitting an ex-
clusive club, America is in desper-
ate plight for sheer lack of class-
rooms," Harvey said.
Elzay said that he also received:
some 100 clippings on an article-
that recently appeared by Clifton-
Fadiman. on the improvement in
elementary school education..

three year scholarship at the
Juilliard School of Music.
Following her studies, Miss Ste-
vens was a semi-finalist in theI
Metropolitan Auditions of the Air.-
During this same time, she
amazed the opera circle by turn-
ing down a contract with the
Metropolitan Opera because she
did not think she was ready.
Makes Debut
With. Mme. -Gutheil-Shoder in
Salzburg,, Austria, the mezzo-so-
prano. studied her most famous
roles from "Der Rosenkavalier,"
Carmen and Octavian. Also stu-
dying'in Paris, Miss Stevens made
her operatic debut in 1937 at the
Prague Opera House in the title
role of "Mignon."
After touring Europe, she ~re-

turned to America to sing
the Metropolitan Opera at
in the 'same role.
Since then she has
movies, records and has
many roles with the Metrop
Opera.
Miss Stevens will return I
York for a concert tour ar
the Metropolitan in Noven

DIAL NO 8-6
...NOW.
"THOROUGHLY
DELIGHTFUL
ENTERTAI NME
-Journal-An

a . '.

.a

LAST NIGHT! Pulitzer Prize Comedy
TEAHOUSE of the AUGUST MOON

-.,°-t

:N

Directed by TED HEUSEL
From the Ann Arbor News, Friday, Oct. 4:

~i

* '* * * * * * * *C '7k' '

-I

"Lovely ladies, kind gentle-
men: Please to introduce my-
self."
So spoke Sakini, the rap-
scallion interpreter of John
Patrick's "The Tea Hobfse of the
A u g U s t Moon," introducing
himself and his play to a large
audience at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater last night.
It is fit and proper that this
review should begin with Saki-
ni, and that it should concern
itself primarily with Robert Lo-
gan's 'fine portrayal of-the role
in this opening production of
the Ann Arbor Civic Theater.
for~the 1957-58.season.
The adjectives "virtuoso" and
"triumphant" are reserved for
the sort of performance that
Ipgan gave last evening; a con-
trolled, yet ebulliently lively
performance which avoided the
destructive pitfalls for ham-

ming and mugging which the
role offers in abundance, and
concentration with charm, dig-
nity and subtle strength upon
the vital business ofmaking an
enchanted home for some oth-
erwise unenchanting banalities.,
Because Logan's Sakini suc-
ceeded so well, the amateur
production is a very funny and
very genuine success. The Tea
House, under Sakini's magic
touch, becomes an Okinawan
Forest of Arden, tantalizing,
wispy and unreal-a fairy place
where anything can and does
happen and where the trite
message of the plot assumes the
immediately acceptable propor-
tions of the moral fable.
Having found his ace in Lo-'
gan, Director Ted .Heusel has
expertly backed his hand with
a masterful job of staging,
beautiful in its attention to de-

tail, its simple settings and bal-
anced groupings, and with'sev-
eral excellent performances
from other members of the
cast.
Konrad Matthgei recovered
from an unsteady and too man-,
nered initial scene to register a
very skillful portrayal of Cap-
tain Fisby, the incompetent
American officer who gets Oki-
nawanized.
"Others Do Well
. William Taylor does well as
the fulminating and exasperat-
ed Colonel Purdy, and Norma
Greenwood makes a quite love-
ly and fluttering Lotus Blos-
som.
Heusel's' Civic Theater group
is off and running this season
iwith a resourceful, .exquisitely
staged and well acted produc-
tion.

'+ ,.

Jf"

of- the A
with Players
Abbey Theatre
J NTRODUC
TYRONE I
CONTINUOUS
AND SUNDAY F

:;
y

Box office open 10-8:15
Curtain time 8:00 P.M.

Call NO 8-6300
All Saturday seats $1.65

candidates will be
erve as officers in
embassies, legations
abroad or in the
State in Washing-

salaries
5,350 per
officer's
and age.

range from
year, depend-
qualifications,

Chapter
ihnded'
(SING M-)-Phi Kappa
rnity was ordered yes-
e Michigan State Uni-
-Fraternity Council to
apter house here and
,rticipation in campus
s for three terms.
nity was penalized for
a spring term peer
Adrian. The council
rty was attended by
ents.
ent and faculty agen-
ng the fraternity have
punishment.

Organization
Notices'
(bse of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered 6tu-
dent organizations only. For the cur-
rent semester organizations should
register not later than October 11.)
Lutheran Student Assn., supper and
program, Oct. 6, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran
Student Center. Slides of European
Study Project by Nancy Mattson.
Unitarian Student Group, business
meeting followed by square dance, Oct.
6, 7:00 p.m., First Unitarian Church.
* * *
Ukranian Students' Club, meeting,
Oct. 7, 8:00 p.m., 1024 Hill Prospective
members welcome.
Newman Club, dinner,, buffet, Oct.
,6, 5:30 p.m., Newman Center. Mixer for
Catholic Graduate Students. Chairman
to be nominated.
Congregational Disciples Guild, cider
and doughnuts after football game,
Oct. 5, Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, Oct.
6, 1:30 p.m., meet in back of Rackham.
Student Zionist Organization, organ-
izational -meeting, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m.,
Hillel Fdundation."
Newman Club, Dunkers' Hour, Oct.
5, 4:00 p.m., Newman Club.

A MOTION PICTURE OF MIGHT, MAGNITUDE AND MAGNI

t

in LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE - Ann Arbor Civic Theatre

It
has the
rugged
grandeur
of Spain
in it...
The
vision
of three
years and
50,000 miles
in it..
An
avalanche
of Spanish
armies
in it...
It has

CS CAI~Y GRAhas the pride
FRANKSLTRA as the passion

6ENC

SOPHIA XPRE
as the flame

the hunge
of the
flesh
in it!
'The thund
of battle

rs

STANLIM KRAMJER'S
MONUMENTAL FILMING, OF

"THEPRxDIt ,mn1 'O* PASSION"

der

TECHNICOLOR' VISTAVISION'

TONIC
SU

tepa quiki
f
GHT at 7 and 9:20 P.M..
JNDAY at 8:00 P.M.
C AAII UI"D

HOWARD HUGHES'
JET PILOT
JOHN WAYNE* JANET LEIGH
U. S. AIR FORCE

in it...
The flame
of women
in it!
A motion
picture'
for au...
For
al time! .;'

Q

'"JAY+C. FLIPPEN PAUL FIX HANS CONRIED a K

i

'JYC.RPPN PALFX AS :RIDS - - '' : *'

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