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October 04, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

liE.

,are

r

lth is start-
of the ad-
lie welfare
s in various
S :. Aal.

Allen Says .
By RONALD KOTULAK
"Few indeed are ,the unaided
steps Britain can take," without
American support, Prof. H. C. Al-
len said yesterday in discussing
the "British Predicament."
Prof. Allen, presently acting as
Commonwealth Fund Professor of.
American history at the Univer-
sity of London, said that the "Pre-
dicament" stems from Britain's
iteprialistic, trade, and power,
history.
In contrast to the time when
Great Britain was the greatest
power in the world, Prof. Allen
noted that now "She, more than
any other natiori" is dependent
upon the United States.
'But, warning Americans to be
cautious of their new role, he said,
"The future of the free wqrld de-
pends on Anglo-American unity."
Britain Affected
Analyzing the Suez crisis, he
said that Britons were deeply af-
fected by Egypt's nationalization
of the Suez Canal, because it pre-
sented an impasse to their vital
trade routes. Tory elements in the
government, which have continu-
ally favored imperialism, probab-
ly influenced Sir Anthony Eden's
decision to invade Egypt, he said.
People Disturbed
Pressure also arose from a sub-
stantial minority of people dis-,

For Mars

Britain Depends on U.S.

bal.-
ie of the
this cri-
,tes con-
ate their
medical
to do in
rs, medi-
e Michi-
,m have,
e Topsy.
States
also an

-Daily-Norman Jacobs
PENSIVE SPEAKER-Prof. H. C. Allen ponders question raised
by a graduate student in history. He said that it was hard for
Britons to take a second-place role.

Fallacy About
Gifted Youths
Pointed Out

i

turbed over national financial
weakness and the disintegration
of the Empire, who relieved their

Cause Cited

PLANS SEMESTER PROGRAMS:
Gothic Film Society Emphasizes Ar

, O

:ng
re

Rock

a' dis-
k inte-
'fing at
) of the

Torre Bissell, '60,
chairman, the
will be the first
71 also.attend to
business for the

.To the list of "facts" which just
aren't so must be added the be-
lief that gifted children are usu-
ally awkward, frail, and emotion-
ally unstable, says Prof. Warren
A. Ketcham of the School of Edu-
cation.
Prof. Ketcham claims instead
that "giftedness is something
which, in a large majority of
cases, touches the whole indi-
vidual."
"As a group," he notes, "gifted
children are not only smarter
than other children. They are also
larger, stronger, healthier, better
adjuster, and more talented than
other children of the same age."
Prof. Ketcham also observes
that "as they grow older, gifted
children show an increase in their
superiority over other children.'
According to Prof. Ketcham,
the reason for the popular mis-'
conception of gifted children may
lie in the fact that "several im-
portant personal characteristics of
gifted children are liable to con-
?use and mislead their parents

pent-up feelings on'the. Suez con-
flict.
Prof. Allen described their reac-
tions as, "the long nerve of Brit-
ish Imperialism exposed and
touched upon the, raw."I
No other great power emulates,
Britain's dependence on over-seas
traffic, to support their national
economy.
With increasing emph sis
placed on import and export btisi-
nesswhich began with the mer-
cantile growth In the 19th cen-
tury, more Britons "are becoming

dependent on the state of inter-
national free-trade. .
U.S. Moving Ahead
British naval power has de-
clined to third in the world with
"the United States and Russia
widening the gap," Prof. Allen
said.
He added that if Britain is ex-
periencing a period 'of decline,
America, in full measure, is "sky-
rocketing ahead."
In case of war, he said that,
Britain alone cannot defeat Rus-
sia. Epitomizing the "British Pre-
-dicament," Prof. Allen said, "On
all major issues where America
will not go, she cannot go."

GrayA reas
* e4o
"Fall-out" of the non-radioac-
tive variety may be responsible for
"extensive dark gray areas and
some of the 'canals' on Mars,"
according to Prof. Dean B. Mc-
Laughlin of the astronomy de-
partment.
Prof., McLaughlin postulates
that violent volcanic eruptions
may have caused the ash. Winds
may then have distributed the
ash and. caused the red dust of
the Martian deserts to obliterate
the markings of volcanic action.
Several decades ago, a small
group of astronomers postulated
that the narrow strips on the sur-
face- of Mars were artificial can-
als to. carry water from melting
polar ice-caps for irrigation pur-
poses.
Their postulates, whidh'came at
a time when knowledge of physi-
cal cnditions on Mars was slight,
gave rise to popular belief that
Mars was a dying planet whose
inhabitants were suffering from
acute water shortage, Prof. Mc-
Laughlin said.
"Apparently the wish to discov-
er beings like ourselves on other
planets is stronger than regard,
for fact,"he noted.
Prof. McLaughlin ttributes the
seasonal color on Mars to thie
covering of dark areas by lighter,
wind-blown dust and the pos-
sible deposition of moisture to.
cause seasonal darkening.
'Speculating on the meaning of
the volcanic activity and extreme
dryness of Mars, Prof. McLaugh-
lin says that Mars may actually
be in the infant stages of plane-
tary development.
He notes that it may be "justy
now going through the stage: of
development through which the
earth passed three billion years
ago."
Prof. McLaughlin 'observes that
"many geologists now hold the
view that ouroceans represent a
gradual accumulation of - water
that issued from the earth's in-
terior in volcanic eruptions."
"If this is so," he added, "per-
haps the development of oceans
and the evolution of higher types
of life belong to Mars' future"'
Mars may already be occupied
by some forms of vegetation. Prof.
McLaughlin said that while there
is no convincing evidence for its
presence, the existence of vegeta-
tion has not bee disproved.

Gothic Film Society-old films?
In contrast to popular belief,
Gothic's aim is not to show films
merely because they are old but
to select films because of their
reputation, accessibility and cine-
matic interest to its members.
These films, chosen because of
their art form, illustrate a parti-
cular interest in camera tech-
nique, acting, sets or script, ac-
cording to Herbert Salt2stein,
president .of the society. Enjoy-
ment is also an important cri-
terian for their selection.
Gothic sponsors ten films,
many of them foreign, during the
year for its membersl These are
chosen on the basis of suggestions
from themembers of the previous
year.
Program notes telling about the
film, its .history, and containing
reviews by critics are provided.
Occasionally guest speakers will
talk on the film's background pre-
ceding a showing.
The theme for this year's films.
'U Press Club
To Present Hoyt
The 40th annual meeting of the
University Press Club, to be key-
noted by Palmer Hoyt of the Den-
ver Post, opens today in Ann
Arbor.
University president Harlan
Hatcher will host today's opening
luncheon, ,while Hoyt's address
will be presented at tonight's ban-
quet at the Union.
Other featured speakers for the,
two-day meeting include Prof.
Wesley H. Maurer, chairman of
the University journalism depart-I
nent; Prof. William D. Revelli,
University Bands director; and
Lieutenant Governor Philip A.'
Hart.'

will be "Man and Society." All
the first semester's programs also
include shorts.
The first film of the semester
will be "Day of Wrath" on Oct.
21. This 1940 Danish film, a story
of Medieval witchcraft was di-
rected by Carl Dreyer during the
Nazi occupation of Denmark.
Peter Lorre will star as a child
murderer in the 1930 German film
to be shown on Nov. 4. This film,
County 11Lists
Seven New,
Road Projects
near Ann Arbor and in Washtenaw
County were included in the five-
year highway improvement pro-
gram announced yesterday by
John C. Mackie, state highway
commissioner.
Seven projects were listed, and
no specific schedule Qf construc-
tion was announced. The roads
listed are:
1) "US-12 from the west county
line to Ann Arbbr, 32.8 miles of'
grading, surfacing and structures;
2) US-23 from Milan to Ann
Arbor, 16 miles of grading, sur-
facing and structures;
3)en M -, rom CheseatoW
North Territorial Rd., 10.4 miles
of surfacing;
4) M-92 from US5-112 to Man-
chester, 5.2 miles of surfacing with
relocation;
5) M-14 (Plymouth Rd.) from
Ann Arbor to the'east county line,
7.8 miles of resurfacing;
6) M-153 (Ford Rd. from "M-14
to the east county line, 5.8 miles
of resurfacing;
7) US-12 in the-Wiard Rd. area
in Ypsilanti-Township, three miles
oresurfacing.

DIAL NO 2-2513
ENDING TONIGH
THEE NEVĀ§R
WAS ... THR
NEVRWIL.LRM
A RUN IUR
PICT iiim
--FEATU INQ -
TONY RANDALL
be ,y Diaih
JoanDlondeli
also
NEWS
CARTOON
SPECIAL

Hart. o 'resufacing

University' Hostso188 Bands
At Tomorrow's Fo'otb~ll Game%

directed by Fritz Lang,
on a real life story.
The 1927 Russian sil
"Mother," directed by V
ovkin, is a story of the I
sian Revolution. It is
based on Gorky's novel, "
and features two of t-
'from the Moscow Art TI
will be shown Nov. 18.
The Swedish film "Tt
Adventure" contrasts a
general theme of' "Man
ciety" to stress "man-and
Arne Scuksdorff directs
film to be shown on Dec
Information on mie
subscriptions may be
from Herbert Saltzstein
3-1430.

The

The University will host 188
high school bands from the state
of Michigan during half-time of
tomorrow's football game.

-ion

meet-
vision.
Fam-
mmit-
0 p.m.,

! "
Club, Square Dance, Oct. 4,
a.m. Newman Center. Idree.
s: cost to 'guests.
* * ~ *i
Guild, marshmallow roast
'ark, Oct. 4, 8:00 p.m., Meet
Lounge.
copal Student Foundation,
b Canterbury House follow-
0, p.m. celebration of Holy
at church, October 4, 12:10
F. Division.
tonal Disciples Guild, in-
reation and refreshments,
p.m. Guild House.
* "**
-Michigan Club, get ac-
party, Oct. 5, 7:30 p.m.,
tudents' Club, meeting with
officers, Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m.,
Inion.
* s *
ub, social meeting, Oct. 5
Lane Hall.
JAL NO 2-3136
kY & SATURDAY
XCELLENT
URE ... REALLY
'-- Her. Trib.
NE POWER

He notes that "the gifted child's
curiosity, persistence, purposeful-
ness, and 'sensitivity, frequently
irritate adults.". Because of these
facets of his character, the child
may appear to be disobedient, in-
attentive, and unstable.
To identify the "gifted," Prof.
Ketcham claims that while group
intelligence tests may be useful
for screening purposes, a good in-
dividual intelligence test is the
most reliable method.
, "Intelligence alone is not
enough to classify a child as
"gifted" he notes.
There is general agreement;'
however, that a child must have
an IQ of at. least 130 in order to
be termed "gifted."

' 12,000 'bandsmen will gather
for, the largest single musica'
event in the state, and the larg-
est massed band ever to assembl
anywhere in the world.
The program will include, "A
Santa Cecilia" by Radaelli, "Wit h
A Little Bit Of Luck" by Frederick
Lowe, "Americans We" by Henry
Fillmore, and "El Gaucho" by' Ted
Mesang. If there is time for an-
other number, either Hoagy Car-
michael's "Stardust" or Fillmore's
"Shoutin Liza Trombone" will be
played.
During the pre-game show of
the Michigan Marching Band 1,-
000 baton twirlers will march cut
on the field and stand at atten-
tion durjng the playing of "Yellow
and Blue." A twirling exhibition
during the playing of "Touch-
down U.S.A." will end the pre-
game show.
About 400 buses covering over
25,000 miles will transport the
students to Ann Arbor. 52,000
sheets of. music will be required
for the instrumentation of 300

W
r
lM

clarinets,. 1,900 cornets, 1,000,
horns, 1,000 drums, 800 tubas, and
1,000 trombones.
Band Day was begun nine yearn
ago with 29 bands and 1500
bandsmen attending. It was con-
ceived and directed by Dr. Wil-
liam 3J. Revelli, director of Uni-
versity bands.

I U

STUDENT RATES

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