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October 03, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Deadline Nearing

r May Preserve Food in Future

By RICHARD RABBIDEAU
Ever think of putting pork chops
in the kitchen cupboard, hambur-
ger in-a desk drawer, steaks in the
trunk of your car?
Someday you may be doing just
that, thanks to the development
of nuclear energy.
There won't be any need to wor-
ry about the meats spoiling either,'
even if you leave them for several
months. They'll be thoroughly
radiosterilized by gamma radiation
before they reach your cupboard.
'' Radiation Protects
'This means that the meats, and
otper foods, will bp exposed to
radiation just long enough to kill
the microorganisns that spoil
food, thus eliminating the need
for refrigeration.
The days of the "icebox," al-
though they may be numbered,
are not yet at an end. Scientists
still have a number of problems
to iron out before irradiated food
will appear on the shelf of your
grocery store.
The University's Fission Products
Laboratory, next door to Victor
Vaughan House, is experimenting
with foods that have been irradi-
ated in an attempt to make them
look, smell and taste better, three
of the few major problems re-
maining.
Housewives Needn't Worry
Housewives needn't worry about
leaving this problem up to physi-
cists, who after all aren't supposed
to know' much about preparing a
good meal-much of the research
is being done by two women home
economists, Katherine Kuipers and
Amy Burchfield.
In a completely modern kitchen
in the basement of the building,
these women work like any home-
maker who's just burned the roast,
attempting to find just the right
spice or combination of spices that
will disguise the off-flavors that
frequently result from radio-
sterilization., '

The bad flavor can be prevented
during the radiation by lowering
the "dose," but this process, called
radiopasteurization, doesn't kill all
the rmicroorganisms. Consequently,
like milk that's been pasteurized,
refrigeration is necessary to pre-
vent spoiling.
Dose Given
The radiation dose is given to
the food in a small chamber, sur-
rounded by walls four feet thick.
The chamber is just down the
hallway from the kitchen.
The materials that are to re-
ceive a dose are placed in a wire
basket at the mouth of a three
foot wide well which extends 17
feet beneath the chamber's floor.
When everyone is safely on the1
other side of the walls, the cobalt
rods which provide the radiation{
are brought up from the well until
they surround the food.
After several hours, the food
has been radiopasteurized; radio-
sterilization requires more treat-
ment.
Food Tested
Once the food has been irradi-
ated, it is tested on animals to
make sure that none of the food
would be dangerous to a living or-
ganism. These animpals are closely
'watched through the fourth gener-
ation, in case there are any genetic
effects.
Many materials other than foods
have been irradiated, and 'the re-
sults have been highly encourag-
ing. For instance, it was discovered
that a human bone could be effec-
tively sterilized by radiation and
successfully transplanted.
The foods and sother materials
that' have been irradiated are
packaged, the only protective mea-
sure necessary to prevent recon-
tamination.
The research conducted at the
Fission Products Laboratory is un-
der the supervision of Prof. L. E.

Brownell, of the engineering school,
and is part of a joint program of
the Michigan Memorial Phoenix
Project and the Engineering Re-
search Institute.
Noted Author
Lectures -today
On Engldnd
Prof. H. C. Allen, currently'
serving as Commonwealth Fund
Professor of American history at
the University of London, will
discuss the "British Predicament"
at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud. A, An-
gell Hall.
The lecture is under the aus-
pices of tfhe history department.
Prof. Allen studied at Harvard
and Oxford, taught at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota and deliv-
ered the Schouler lectures at
Johns Hopkins University in 1956.
He Is the author of the recent
book, "Great Britain and the
United States: A History of An-
glo-American Relations, 1783-
1952."
Prof. Allen was also joint edi-
tor, with C. P. Hill, of "British
Essays in American History," pub-
lished this year on the 350th an-
niversary of the founding of
Jamestown.
Bar To' Honor
eu, Professor
Prof. Emeritus John E. Tracy,
of the Law School, will be honored
as a 56 year ;member of the State.
Bar of Michigan at their annual
meeting this week in Detroit?
Your University faculty members
are addressing this session of the
Bar Association. Prof. William J.
Pierce and Prof. Lwis M. Simes
of the Law School'and Dr. Seward
E. Miller, director of the Institute
of 'Industrial Health spoke to, the
group yesterday.
Pref. Charles W. Joiner of the
Law School will speak on "Pro-
posed New Rules on Procedure and
Their Effect on Negligence.Litiga.-
tion" tomorrow.
/
New TV SeaSon
Begins for 'U'
The speech department, in co-
operation with the University tele-
vision offices, began programming
for the 1957-58 season over
WPAG-TV, channel 20, Ann Ar-
bor, yesterday.,
The programs to be presented
during the year include "Story-
time," a . children's program;
"Dateline Ann Arbor," commu-
nity news and features; "Sports
Parade," sports features and in-
terviews; and "Studio Sampler,"
a variety program.

AA Theati
Will Begix
ilBNew Seasc
The curtain will rise on
Arbor Civic Theatre's fir
duction of the 1957-58
"Teahose of the August.
at 8 p.m. tonight at the
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Ted Heusel will direct I
Arbor production of this
winning play by John
Captain Fisby will be pc
by Conrad Mathaie with
Logan playing the part of
tive Sakini. Bill Taylor %
Colonel Purdy.
This Drama Critics Awa
ning play will run throu
urday. Tickets are avail
the Lydia Mendelssohn ]
fice.

SIGN UP--Appointmints for senior pictures can 'be made on
the diag or at the Engineering Arch between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
today or at the Student Publications Building between 9 a.m, and
5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All appointments must be made
by October 10. Pictures are being taken at the Student Publications
Buil4ing, 420 Maynard.
NEW DESKS, LIGHTS:
Renovations Undertakan
At U Residence Halls

DIAL NO

Comedy
is even
FUI
On i

_w"

'I

ibly

the

Selection

,;,

-t
(Use of this column for announce- present semester the examination
ments of meetings is available to of- period begins January 17, 1958. Publi-
ficially recognized and registered stu- city for an event may not be released
dent organizations only. For the cur- 'until approval has been secured. For
rent semester organizations should detailed procedures and regulations re-
register not later than October 11.) lating to student organization activi-
* * * ties, see University Regulations Con-
'cerning Student Affairs, Conduct and
Registration of Student Organi.- Discipline, copies of which are avail
tions: Student organizations planning able in the Office of Student Affairs,
to be active during the present semes-.2011 Student Activities Building.
ter should complete registration in the
Office of Student ,Affairs not later . "* *
than' October 11. Privileges such as International Committee, Women's
'the use of meeting rooms in University League American-Foreign Sisters, im-
buildings are available to recognized portant meeting of both American and
organizations only. Student organiza- foreign sisters, Oct. 3, 7:15 p.m., Hus-
tions registered by this date will be sey Room, League.
considered officially recognized. * * *
Recognition of new campus organi- Circolo Italiano, organizational meet-
zations falls within the jurisdiction of ing with election of officers and the
the Student Government Council. In- planning of activities, Oct. 3, 4:00 p.m.
formation and assistance concerning 414 Romance Language Bldg.
procedure may be secured from Stu- " . *
dent Government Council offices in U of M Folklore Society, Welcome
the Student Activities Building or Back Follk Sing, Oct. 3, 7 30-10 :00 p.m.,
from the Administrative Secretary, Mrs Lane Hall, Fireside Room. Bring in-
Callahansrants, songs and frlends.
Student Organizations sponsored Ac- s s a
tivities. All activities and projects. Hillei, Hillel Assembly, organizational
sponsorednor produced bey studentor- meeting, Oct. 3, 4:00 p.m., Mllel Foun-
ganizations must receive the approval dation.
of Student Government Council. Only ' * ,
recognized organizations 'are eligible
to submit a petition for consideration. Student National Education Associa-
A petition should be submitted to the tion, open house, Oct. 3; 3-5 p.m., Rd.
Council i least two weeks before the school Lounge. Free coffee and re-
event is to take place. Forms may be freshments.
secured from the Administrative Sec- F# *
retary of Student Government Coun- Hawaii Club, social meeting, Oct. 5,
cil in the Student Activities Building 7:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
(Room 1538 or 2011). Activities are to * * *
be scheduled so as to take place before NAACP, meeting, Oct. 3, 7:00 p.m.,
the seventh day prior to the beginning 3510. SAB. Discussion: ."Little Rock
of a final examination period. For the Situation."

Summertime was renovation
time in 'the University residence
halls.
Work was done on all men's,
quadrangles and on several wo-
men's residences.
Students in East Quadrangle
will have 523 new desks in a few
weeks, thus relieving a situation
caused by the shipment of defec-
tive desks at the beginning of the
school ; year. The first shipment
was found, to be weakly con-
structed.
The, desks on order provide a
greater working area, Bruce
Tappe, quadrangle business man-
ager said.
Leonard Schaadt, bus in e ss
manager of the residence halls,
described the work done on light-
ing fixtures in East, West and
South Quadrangle study halls.
Perhaps the most extensive
work 'is being done in Mosher
Hall plumbing. According to
Schaadt, the job is now "partly
completed" and may take some
time to finish.
Schaadt also mentioned that
most of the painting work was
done during the summer. This
year walls in West Couzens Hall
and in South Quadrangle were
painted.
Additional bicycle racks have
been added to many residence
halls, and lilien, silverware, and
china, "which has a high break-
age rate," have been replaced.
Schaadt described the renova-
tion program as a year-around

October 16,
BOB SCOBEY
October 23
DAVE BRUBECK
October 30'
ERROLL GARNER
Novemhber 13
OSCAR PETERSON
plus Les Jazz Modes
November 27
CHARLIE BARNET BAN~

I

JAYN

dence halls are inspected. Schaadt
then draws up a budget which al-
lots the renovation work'"for the
summer and the coming year.
When in Chicago
Visit The
BLUE, NOTE
October 2
GEORGE SHEARING QUINTET
plus
Leon Sash Quartet

iL

JOA

with
The New Corn
S wo

Premieres
TONIGHT

dRim,

Week Nights at 7 &9 PM.

Y
N ION
OD-
rI

IKES
r Low Prices
IMPORTED
BICYCLES
$3595

"A MUST!" - World-Telegram

project which
spring vacation

begins during
when the resi-.

--New

"MARVELOUS ENTERTAI NMENT!"
-Cue Magc
"EXCEPTIONAL CHARM!" -
"PURE PLEASURE!" -

NOW

hrIE:1R1

DIAL
NO 2-31]36

, '

jboldest
em~n~wq
tI oy

I

BUDGET TERMS

I'

BIKE & TOY

NO 2-0035

Near Michigan Daily

NI

C
Concert

1A

01
at the
EX TR~
in

BC OPERA*
OMPANY
version in English, of
MARRIAGE
F FIGARO
first concert of the
4. ONCERT SERIES
Hrill Auditorium
Oct"6, 8:30" P.M.

Gifea a jtud
TONIGHT and FRIDAY
7 and 9 P.M.
THE MAN WHO
CAME TO DINNER
with
MONTY WOOLEY
BETTE DAVIS
ANN SHERIDAN
BILLIE BURKE
Saturday' 7 and 9:20 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 P.M.
MRS. MINIVER
with

x
P.
,.
J q
9 ?:
;

Tyrone
POWER

__
, .

Ava
GARDN ER

with Players from the
Abbey Theatre company
INTRODUCE' BY
TYRONE POWER
-r Screen Play by Prang S. Nugent
Produ cbMcael Kianin
Dircte! y JhnFord
Presented by Warner Bros.
Filmed in the Emerald Isle itself

0 Next Attraction
"JET PILOT"

Mel
FERRER

Errol
FLYNN

U-

"THOROUGHLY:
OELIGHTFUL

Opens TONIG-T- ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE'S

ENTERTAI NMENT!"
-Rose Pelswick, Journal-Amer
S additional
Selected Short Subjects

Robert Logan
Bill Taylor

Konrad Matthaei
Jhn Rae
IN

Norma Greenwood
A. B. CrandeII

-

Pulitzer Prize and Circle Award COMEDY,
TEAHOUSE of thAU STM

Sun., 0

Directed Eby TED HEUSEL - October 3, 4, 5

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