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October 01, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Panel Calls TV, Drus Broadcast ~M-~
' ECAMPUSRATE
Possible Gene Hazards To Feature TIME $4 D .ce $7
F Reg Pri- $7
Some television receivers, the I
caffeine of coffee, gout remedies Dr. Paul T. Chapman, tuberculo-I8c a Copy
and related drugs were added to sis controller for the city of De- Reg. Price $6.75
the list of hazards to the genetic troit. ,, CB'th "Third r-
purity of mankind by a panel of "Science," he said, "needs to WCBNs the T h i r d Pro-
experts gathered by the Michigan know much more about radiation gramme" will feature an informal I
Tuberculosis Association recently. before pronouncing it a hazard. discussion with Prof. James Spuh- Name
The panel was assembled to "We should avoid excessive ler of the anthropology and hu-1"+
discover if X-rays of the chest doses of X-rays, of course. They man genetics departments at 8
are more beneficial th n harmful, should be used wisely, but it is I Address
Dr. James V. Neel of the human unthinkable that they should be p.m. tonight, according to Don
genetics department said that ir- discarded." , Mullally, iroducer of the pro- I *To Faculty, Extension, part-time and regular students. M
radiating glands with high energy. Dr. Neel commented that the gram. .I dent Periodical Agency, Box 2006, or phone our office, N
generally produces undesirable maximum allowable exposure to Prof. Spuhler will discuss the (9 A.M. to 9 P.M.). Special campus rates also available to
mutations which may not become radiation deemed advisable is be- effects of radiation on human be-. other periodicals. Pay after the subscription commences.
visible for five to 20 years due to ing constantly revised downyard. ings.
the accumulative effect of the Presently, he said, the maximum
radiations. exposure may be about 25 roent-
The experts concluded that the gens during the first 30 years of
benefits derived from the use of life.
X-rays exceed the potential phy- However, he pointed out, some
sical harm of their use. Of far television sets tested with Geiger
greater danger, they agreed, was counters have been found to give
the damage done to the germ cells of high energy radiation. The ac-
which determine the shape of cumulative effect of this radia-
future generations. tion can cause mutations.- Does your bike have
One of the immediate results The panelists revealed that caf-
of excessive radiation, Dr. Frank feine can also be used to cause
H. Bethell of the University's genetic mutations in experiments. oo .
Simpson Memorial Institute said, Dr. Fred J. Hodges of the ra-
may be leukemia. diology department' said innova-
Scare stories about the effects tions in X-ray techniques are be-
of radiation were 'discounted by ing developed so that the roent-
genologist can obtain the resultsN o1you h veto wa .k
he desires with much less expo-
Corporation sure to dangerous rays. mile with your bike ?
CNN A new type of film for use with
Su orts New X-rays is being tested. This film
will enable the technician to pro-
duce the desired intensity of im-
Course age with half the time of expo- Do you have unlucky
sure.
The literary college's new course Researcher have also discov- strikes With your b e
in Asian Civilizations is made pos- ered that if a strip of aluminum, w hk
sible by a Carnegie Corporation approximately one millimeter
grant of $26,625, the University thick, isj.placed between the ma-
announced yesterday. chine produping the radiations
Available next fall, the course and the patient, harmful radia- Did f '57
will consist of two semesters of tion is cut about in half.
four credit hours each, open to --
freshmen and sophomores. It will a Tnd didn't get one
be equally suitable for students U Toresent
planning to end their studies of
the Orient with this course and TwoFeatures
those desiring preparation for ad- W a u e
vanced courses on Asia.
"Courses in Asian studies have
been offered at the graduate level Lf
in previous years, and for this Two University television pro-
reason the University has a large ,rams will be seen over WPAG-TV
group of Asian experts in many Ann Arbor at 7:30 and & p.m.
CharTes E.degaard of thseit a desdayehistory of Harold Sei- YOU DIDN'T GET IT HE RE
college explained. del, a rheumatic heart patient,
The chairman of the faculty will be discussed by Dr. Franli
group, whose work this year' will Jlbscused by Troraiir
be financed by the Carnegie grant, Johnson, chief of Thoraicic Sur-
will be Professor James L. Crump gery at University Hospital and
ofteCieedprmn.D.RcadJdeo h is tdn ieOther members, include Prof. program of "Frontiers of Health."
The second program, "A Land
Robert I. Crane of the history To Be Free," part of the Univer-
department; -Prof. John W. ns HalllviinHorseiswl
director of the Center'for Japanese yTelevision Hour series, will -
studies; Prof. Robert E. Warel 'of document 15th and 16th century
te p oliticalsciencedepartment; 'sea exploration with dramatic vig- "W E CATER TOIG WHEELS
Prof. Irving M. Copi of the philos- nettes and glimpses of'original
ophy department; Prof. Herbert documents. Professor Peckham of
H. Paper of near eastern studies; the University history department
and Prof. William D. Shorger of will narrate.
anthropology and near eastern
studies.
Feelin' blue? Need money, too?
b erStudents, weve got news for you!
Mrice Ma

NDRY
$1.100
WAT'S A BARE-HEADED STRONG MAN? WHAT'S A RICH FRESHMAN'S BEANIE?
_____ yoursin an
id colors. - .
clothing M
- HATLESS ATLAS MINK OINK
A. Richard Miller Robert Drupieski
Queens 0011101 aBucknell
REQUEST Q MOST POPULAR GAME that ever went to
lege-that's Sticklers! Just write a simple rid
WHAT IS A ROLLED-UPMAP? and a two-word rhyming answer. For exami
What's a big cat shot full of holes? (Ansv
( C RYd Apeppered leopard.) Both words must have
SCsame number of syllables-bleak freak, flu
truant, vinery finery. Send Sticklers, with y
.:<name, address, college and class to Happy-J
Lucky, Box 67A, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Don't
~ "drawings! We'll pay $25 for every Stickler

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