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September 29, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY _1

Libro

y Near Completion

Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available tp of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only. For the cur-
rent semester organizations should
register not later than Octpber 11.)
Hilfel, Yiddish, class ;-now being
formed. Instructor will be Prof. Herb-
ert Paper of the Near East Dept.
For application call Hillelrsecretary,
NO 3-4129 or Marvin Glerver (until
midnight) NO 2-5470.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association, meet-
ing, 'September 29, 6:00 p.m.,, Lutheran
Student Center, Hill and Forest. Speak-
er, The Rev. Brignandan Sahay of
India, "Lutheran Youth of India and
the Church."
Senior Society, business meeting,
Sept. -30, 8:000 p.m., League Cave.
* S *
U of M Folklore Society, Welcome
Back! Folk sing, Oct. 3, 7:30-10:00 p.m.,
Lane Hall, Fireside Room..All welcome.
Bring instruments, songs and friends.
s . .
Phi Lambda Upsilon, Honorary
Chemical Society, monthly meetiing,
Oct/ .1, 1957, 7:30 p.mi., West Confer-
ence Room, Rackham. Speaker: Mayor
Samuel. J. Eldersveld, "Ann Arbor:
Problems, Plans. Prospects."
* * *
GraduateOuting C:ug, hikingand
supper, Sept. 29, 1:30 p.m., Rackham.
Deutscher Verein, membership meet-
ing, Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., Room 3-G
Union.
Michigan Union, Sept. 29, 8:00 p.m..,
2nd floor Ballroom, Union. The Quar-
terback films, films of today's game,
narrated by Mr., Richard Balzhiser.
« s

CROSS EQUATOR:
King Neptune Calls on
+ ky"" newe

'U' Students

-Daily-Wesley Kar
EARS COMPLETION-Builders are rapidly adding the finishing touches
irary, the largest of its kind in the country. The new building will serve"
iformation source primarily for undergraduate students. Located adja-
rn South University, the state-appropriated building will accommodate
will, have access to 50,000 books on open stacks. The entire structure is
t and privacy for studying, displaying sound-conditioning, improved
and arranged to allow only a small section of the room to be visible
ening date is scheduled for sometime in November.

Congregational and Disciple
discussion, Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m.,
House, 524 Thompson. Topic:
ern Art-Where is it going?"
. . .

Guild,
Guild
"Mod-

By BARTON HUTHWAITE
King Neptune summoned ap-
proximately 90 University stu-
dents to appear before' him on
charges of being "vile land lubbers
and polywogs" this past summer.
Queen Neptune, accompanied by
her child and court, was on hand
to witness the proceedings. Hun-
dreds of Shellbacks lined t h e
crowded courtroom of the battle-
ship Wisconsin.
Poly.og Vance Johnson, '60
Eng., showed no outward signs of
concern before the trial. He noted
the 'date and time . . . 11:05 A.M.,
June 25, 1957. It was the day
"Whisky" would cross the Equator.
Polywog Faces King
"Polywog Johnson come and
face the King," a shellback boom-]
ed. "Are you a low, vile polywog?,"
asked the King. "No, I am not,"
answered Johnson defiantly. Im-
mediately, two husky sailors es-
corted Polywog Johnson to a pool
filled with garbage and grease and
heaved him in,
After many submersions and
subsequent questions of "Are you
a polywog?". Johnson was finally
proclaimed "Shellback" by King
Neptune. "Crossing the Equator
can be quite an experience," smiled
NROTC midshipman Johnson. "It
converted me from a Polywog to
a full-fledged Shellback."
Shellback Johnson was one of 90
University NROTC sophomore and
senior midshipmen participating in
the Navy's two mor' summer
cruise. Ports of call included Chile,
Cuba and the Panama Canal. The
students were given actual prac-
tice in gunnery and naval proce-
dures.
South Americans Friendly
"The people of South .America
are very friendly," commented
Frank Zimmerman, '60 Eng., "es-
pecially the Chileans." Many of-
fered to take us to dinner. Others
took us on tours around the city
of Valpraiso just for the oppor-
tunity of practicing their English.
Of course we said yes-especially
to the girls," he laughed.
The midshipmen were specifi-
cally told nbt to discuss politics or
religion while on shore leave. "The
Chileans had an intense interest
in the United States and hoped
someday to come for a visit. They
seemed to have the'impression that
all Amrerans are very wealthy,"
"added Zimmermian.'
"Due to the free-spending of
American tourists and sailors,
Chileans. considered themselves
very poor," Johnson explained.
Most people who can afford to
driv.e cars have 1940 models. A

new car down there would cost
around $10,000."
Chileans are proud of their
Naval Academy located in Val-
praiso. "One night a storm pre-
vented the shore leave boats from
returning to the fleet. Arrange-
ments were made with the Chilean
Naval Academy to have us sleep
in their quarters overnight," John-
son stated.
"Although it does not even ap-
proach Annapolis in size, the men
are respected throughout South
America and the world. Unfortu-
nately, it was during their vaca-
tion so we did not have an oppor-
tunity to speak with them;" he
said.
Rock. 'n roll seemed to facinate
the South Americans, "Any sailor
who could rock 'n roll made a hit.
They were eager to learn about the
new craze spreading over, the
States," Zimmerman smiled.
Shellb-cks Johnson and Zim-
merman produced a framed certi-
ficate proclaiming t h e m full-
fledged Shellbacks. "I'd like to go;
back down to South America'
again," Zimmerman grinned. Ex-
polywog Johnson agreed.

NEPTUNE CALLS--Former polywogs Vance .1
Zimmerman answered the summons of King Ne
to become bona-fide "shellbacks."

i.

y +

of Democracy
Comuns

John]

Peek of the
partment and'
assic works of
zbating Com-
n the East.
e printed in
y the United
Agency and.
s in June of
e intended to
yen giveaway
rx, Stalin and:

e location
its feasi-
e printed
distribu-
from 10

Distribution in India was appar-
ently not uniform.
The books- printed in the pilot
project were:
- Hamilton, Madison and Jay on
the Constitution: Selectiofis from
the Federalist Papers by Ralph H.
Gabriel.
From the Declaration of Inde-
pendence to the Constitution: the
Roots of American Constitutional-
ism by Carl J. Friedrich and Rob-
ert G. McCloskey.
Thonas Paine: Common Sense
and Other Political Writings by
Nelson F. Adkins.
Selected Writings on Nature and
Liberty: Henry D. Thoreau by
Oscar Cargill.
The Political Writings of Thom-
as Jefferson: Representative Selec-
tions by Edward' Dumbauld.
Benjamin Franklin: the Auto-
biography and selections from his
Other Writings by Herbert Schnei-
der.
Writings of Thomas Jefferson:
Representative.
John C. Calhoun: a disquiition
on Government by C. Gordon Post.
Prof. Peeks' book was included
in this set.
These volumes were not trans-
lated but printed in English. In
the future, USIA plans to print
some books translated into the
native languages -of. the countries
in which they are distributed.
In nine months,- four of these
volumes had sold 4,000 copies and
the rest were close behind.
On the basis of the success of
these books, five more were printed
and all 13 were distributed in Afri-
can and Far Eastern countries..

Iva KWitchell
To Perform
At Mendelsson
A rare combination of ballet
dancer and comedienne will be
presented to Ann Arbor audiences
on Tuesday, Oct. 15, when "Poison
Iva" Kitchell will present her-
world-famous one woman si 'w at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Miss Kitchell, who got her start
in dancing from the Chicago Opera
Ballet,- decided that some of the
serious modern dances were ridic-
ulous, and begai to mimick her
instructor.
Fortunately, the instructor was
not touchy about his art and gave
Miss Kitchell a comedy spot in the
ballet. From then on, she pro-,
ceeded to add comedy to all kinds
of dancing, from classical to mod-
ern.
Members of the audience, as
often material for Miss Kitchell's
sketches as are dancers, lovers,
hostesses, salesmen and "psycho-
chondriacs,"' rarely escape her
comic treatment.
On a recent tour of South Amer-
ica, one of Miss Kitchell's sketches,
"Carmen Kitchell from Kansas,"
proved' such a- success that on
sixteen occasions she was required
to repeat the takeoff on the sultry,
Carmen.
Spokesmen for the Ann Arbor
Civic Ballet, who are sponsoring
the event, characterize Miss Kit-
chell as not only a "brilliant
dancer, but also a deft caricaturist
and commentator" who says her
penetrating and witty observations'
in dance."
Tickets for the Ann Arbor per-
formance will go on sale at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater box
office on Thursday, Oct. 10, and
mail orders are now being ac-
cepted.

Congregational and Disciple Guild,
meeting, Sept. 29, 7:30' p.m.. Congre-
gational Church. Speaker: Rev. J. Ed-
gar Edwards, "Christian's Role on the
University Campus."
Gamma Delta Lutheran Students'
Group, weekly Sunday supper and
program, Sept. 29, V..:00 p.m.,, Univer-
city Lutheran Chapel. Discussion: "The'
Social Life of a Campus Christian."
*M v *
Unitarian Student Group, annual
fall picnic, Sept. 29, 4:30 pm., be-
hind the League.
Gunipowder
Joke Averted.
On the Stanford University cam-
pus in Stanford, California, festiv-
ities after the San Jose football
game were much less noisy be-
cause the night before the game a
man walking his dog discovered
fifty pounds of gun. powder in a'
field behind the school's mauso-
leum, and turned it. over to school
authorities, much to thei, disap-
pointment of the would-be celeb-
rants. Stanford, incidentally, has,
a football cheer which ends in a
monstrous BOOM!

2o

and Pamplona
and the
unfulfilled love...

Hemij

NOW
PLAYING

DIAL NO 2-2513

r .

I

Th Town I TALKIN0I The Town IS LAU41ING!)
BRIGNG YOU THE NEW
COMIC SENSATION
TONY RANDALL

AMk

and Paris
and the
many men...

'35'

a

and Madrid
and-the
violences.:.

with)
Betsy Drke-
Joan' Blondell-
Jayne Mansfield-

ADDED-NOVELTY-NEWS

It

ii
¢ Yom' f r. s wY.q '}wi ja V}1 iK' J,1,7. R' "
f" ::: .C "}"'.¢Y 1 w Y:.. ''1 ::"Kt }..}' 1Yf 1a4 iYtitv u 1'A4s ' [+ vS. Y . Ib:S w C1

Premieres
TODAY !

1r TI. rb

DIAL
NO 8-6416

and SanSebastian
and the
wild dawns:.

SAL

rSTEM

PETITIONS ACCEPTED
for po4itions on the Central Committee of
HILLELZAPOPPIN'
Oct. 1-Oct. 1 3
Pick up Petitions at '
HILLEL FOUNDATION, 1429 Hill Street
it~

"A GOOD MYSTERY ... EXPERTLY DONE !"
-HERALD TRIBUNE
"Keeps a viewer engrossed all the way'
-New York Times
"Believable, interesting, ingratiating"
-New York Post
"Strong and astonishing mystery drama .. .
thrills by the yard"
-World Telegram

and Biarritz
and the
big memories...

the correct viewing
any Nikkor Lens -
8mm wide angle
135mm telephoto-
the need for acces-

t

CST PUBLIC
HOWING

*7
Ton ight at 7 +and 9 P. M

Scotland Yard's
Detective
Tom Holliday
solves a fantastic
series of crimes!

in
DARRYL F ZANUCKtS
most provocative production I
ERNEST HEMINGWAY'S
most tantalizing novelf

CKrected by
HENRY KING

1hZ

1'

Thursday, Oct. 10
Z,-.0 Noon till 9 P.M.

JAKHW IS:

tI

X ':l

Y"....

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