100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TI MCHIGAN DAILY
........ ..:.:.::.......:.:...:.:.:.:...:.:.R G EN S A N O U CE
prtnYsat ionaiun ersttionsG v .e te o e c
pott TVaretatons LcatonsreuStionsLav of Absne

1=

Arod 4

To FacultyMembers

0

titles
mem-
e Uni-
meet-
ekman
>fessor
Lurvey-

Pl

Chapin,
rofessor
9 paint-
in 1924.

on

de an assistant pro-
tus of mathematics.
rt Cole, who joined
1924, was made pro-
tus of engineering
emeritus of zoology
d on Prof. Lee Ray-
vho had been on the
7 years.
member since 1923,
Louis Dunham was
is request at age 65
.the title of professor
history.

AP'Noe ores ~.....
RUSSIAN TV-USSR claims 27 TV stations, including certain amateur stations and rebroadcasting
stations. Still far behind the United States, the Soviet government plans to have more than 75
stations in operation by 1960.
STILL BEHIND U.S.:I
Television on Upswing in USSR

Leaves of absence were granted
to 11 faculty members by the Re-
gents at their September meeting
held yesterday.
The Regents also extended one
leave of absence and accepted the
report of one off-campus assign-
ment.
Leaves of absence are as follows:
Prof. Donald G. Marquis, chair-
man of the department of psy-
chology, was given a leave with-
out salary for the fall semester
of the 1957-58 year. He will serve
as special. consultant to the pres-
ident of the Social Science Re-
search Council.
Granted Leave
Prof. Wayne L. Whitaker, assis-
tant dean of the Medical School,
was granted sick leave from July
1 to Dec. 31, 1957.
Prof. Richard C. Boys, of the
English department, was given a
leave without salary for the 1957-
58 academic year in order to de-
vote full time to the Woodrow
Wilson Fellowship program.
Prof. Edward L. Walker, of the
psychology departnent, was given
a three-fourths time leave in or-
der to serve as research psycholo-
gist in the Engineering Research
Institute.
Goes to Cambridge
Prof. A. Benjamin Handler, of
the school of architecture and de-
sign was granted a sabbatical
leave. He will spend the 1957-58
academic year at Cambridge Uni-
versity in England.
Prof. G. Walter Woodworth, of
the business a d m i n is t r a t io n
school, was granted a two-thirds
leave for the first semester of the
1957-58 year. The one-third time-
not covered by the leave will be
used to continue his committee
assignments, graduate student
counseling and other non-teach-
ing duties while he revises his
book on "The Monetary and
Banking System."
To Revise Series
Prof. Herbert E. Miller, of the
business administration school,
was granted a one-half time leave,
without pay, for the first semes-
ter of the 1957-58 year. He will

use the leave to revise the Finney-
Miller accounting series.
Dr. Jere M. Bauer, of the Medi-
cal School, was granted a leave
without salary from Sept. 1
through Oct. 15., 1957, In order to
serve as an exchange professor in
the Medical School at Medellin,
Columbia.
0. L. Tiffany, research engineer
in the Engineering Research In-
stitute, was given a leave without
salary from-Sept. 7 through Nov.
10, 1957. He is participating in an
Ofice of Naval Research adminis-
tered air defense study for the
United States Marine Corps.
Adds Extension
An extension of one year was
added to the 1958-54 leave, with-
out absence, of Prof. Donald R. G.
Cowan, of the school of business
administration. He. is continuing
as director of research into the
growth,'requirements of the steel
industry for the Brookings Insti-
tution.
An office-campus duty assign-
ment was given to Prof. James B.
Griffin, director and curator of ar-
chaeology, Museum of Anthropol-
ogy. His leave from Sept. 2 to Oct.
7 was :granted to allow him to de-
liver a paper before the Fifth In-.
ternational Congress of Quarter-
nary Studies beig . held in Spain.
4'

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES
STATE STREET at NORTH UNIVERSITY
Tonight 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday 8:00 only
Color
ROBERT TAYLOR
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
JOAN" FONTAINE..
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50c

11

ajans, who had
y in ,1936, was
professor emer-
e College of En-
ince 1920, Prof.
isen, was given
sor emeritus of

He
f ac

1920, Prof.
was niade
meritus of.

on Kahn, 70,
s of professor
y' of spyhilis
f the serology
the Serologic
i. He had been'
ice 1928.
)r emeritus of
ded to Prof.
la, a member

By THOMAS P. WHITNEY
The Soviet Union is busy build-'
ing television stations - but it
has-a longway to go to catch up
with the United States.
The Soviet government claims
that at present there are 27 TV
stations operating in the U.S.S.R.
However, included in this figure
are certain amateur stations -and
several rebroadcasting stations
which merely 'relay Moscow pro-
grams, without originating any of
their own, to areas near the Soviet
Capital but too far away for di-.
rect reception.
(This compares to nearly 450
TV stations operating .in the
United States as long ago as No-
vember, 1955)
Plans 75 Stations
The Soviet government plans, it
has been officially stated, to have
in' operation "more than 75" tele-
vision stations by the end of 1960.
Nine stations which will origin-
ate their own programs are under
construction at the present time
for completion by the end of 1957.
Another six rebroadcasting sta-
tions near Moscow and Leningrad
are being built - also set for com-
pletion before the end of 1957.
And in addition five more TV.
stations are presently under con-
struction for completion sometime
after 1957.
The, grand total of stations built
and building would thus apparent-
ly add up to 47.
It has been stated officially that
by the end of 1964 the population
of areas of the Soviet Union in
which television broadcasts can be
received will amount to 30 million
people.
This figure is much larger' than
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
Late Show TONIGHT
LAST FEATURE AT 11:15 P.M.
Dial NO 2-3136

the size of the population in areas
where TV broadcasts currently
can be received.,
System' Poor
The Soviet television system
makes a' poor showing when
stacked up against that of the
United States. '
In the first place not only is
the number of Soviet stations rel-
atively few but the number of tele-.
vision receiving sets in Soviet
homes is also small.
At the end of 1955 in the entire
U.S.S.R. there were 820,000 TV
sets. By now the figure has risen
--but is probably below two mil-
lion.
In the United States by the end
of 1956 there were an estimated 42
million sets.
In the second place, in the So-
viet Union transcontinental trans-
mission of'TV programs is practi-
cally non-existent.
Even according to the plans for
1960 only a little more than a doz-
en stations will be able to receive
Moscow programs by microwave
relay and of these only a few will
be able to send their programs to
Moscow.

In contrast, in the United States
nearly all existing TV stations are
linked in transcontinental net-
works.
Programs Few
In W the third place, Soviet TV
stations carry fcw programs. For
example the station in Tiflis in
Georgia only recently increased
the number of evenings per week
which it is on the air from three
to four.
Most Soviet TV stations have
few or no daytime programs and
even their evening broadcasts are
limited to a few hours a day.
Soviet color TV has not yet got
started. Only by the end of 1958,
is it expected that compatible col-
or and black and white broad-
casts will be made on an experi-
mental basis.
TV is popular in the Soviet, Un-
ion and the government sees in it
a powerful propaganda weapon
for indoctrinating the populace in
communist' ideology,
Therefore it can be expected
that the Kremlin will make a big
effort to push the developient of
television.

7

MEMBERSHIP MIXER

x

Sunday, Sept. 22

7 -10 P.M.01

HI LLEL.

DANCING, REFRESHMENTS

ENTERTAI NMENT

11

Subscribe to

The Michigan Daily

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street

giv-
2ritus
[ty in

- _.._. .._ _.. s _.. _. ._.. __._ __._ _._.. _.__ .._.. ._ _ .._ . .... . .. ._.._ _. ._ ..

r.

A.

r emeritus of
'ded to Prof.
ens,. who has
for 37 years.
r since 1936,
swander. was

ps I

danceatthle Union
Music by,
Jim Servis' Orchestra
Sat., Sept. 21 Union Ballroom
9-12 $1.50 per Couple

retir-
e, was
emeri-

r

ther Purdom
r emeritus of
pointments and

was
the
Oc-'

'4f,
S~
-U ------
;1i

iljy 34 Years
ieritus of civil en-
awarded to Prof.
Sherlock, a nmember'
oine 1923.
ritus of the Mu-
id professor emeri-
and painting were
f. Jean Paul Slus-
of the faculty for'
rd Lyon Watkins
title of professor

STARTING TODAY

"

I

EN QS
TON IGHT

Doors Open
at 12:45

C. MICHIGRN

Dial
NO 2-2513

6 of geodesy
awarded to
rwho Joined

aBROADWAY'S SIG ~~ 2'
BOY-LOVES-
PAJAMA- GIRL -
SENSATION
IS ON THE
,WARNERCOLOR-WARNER BROS.
DIXs a
┬░John Ratt { aI 1Iany.Ede :

d~ra nt 1oves
]Uel___ h er1ri

ena;'

NOW...*'

I

How to be more interesting...

Opening SUNDAY!
THE MOST
CHALLENGING STORY OF
FAITH EVER

r'i.

In bull-sessions you'll know what you're talk-
ing about. Win late-hour debates by backing
your views with less bulland more fact
On dates you'll be master of livelyconversa-
tion. Come up with talk spiced with behind-
the-scenes items- on current affairs and
personalities. You'll have timely appeal
In class you'll have perspective. Know more
about the world today, and how it relates to
the past.and future.
How? $y Leading The New York Times

'every day. Enjoy its colorful articles that
make the news fun to know and exciting to
read. You'll get more on sports, theatre,
books, TV, world and national events.
wake up to The Times every morning.'It's
much more interesting, and you will be, too.
See your Times campus representative today
- for delivery to your door every day.
DIETRICH BERGMANN
Student Newspaper Agency
P. 0. BOX 2194
UNIVERSITY STATION

Leo
Mc~areys

CUT OUT AND MAIL TODAY to DIETRICH BERGMANN
Box 2194. University Station -- Ann Arbor Michicaan

Yl 1iM Y 'fYT' /1YATt!!1hY.4 iA

' *P ioV i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan