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May 28, 1958 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VMDNESDAY. I

ANN ARBOR SELF-SURVEY:

"Your Best Bet -Cal A Vet"
VETERAN'S CAB
NO 3-4545 NO 2-4477 NO 3-5800
SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR Airports

Study Group Reveals Discrimination Factor in Employme

I

(Continued from Page 1)
F'inally' she asked the manage-
ment why she was not promoted.
She was told, "We have to draw
the line somewhere."
The woman quit.
Negroes, according to the Sur-

We Go Anywhere

24-Hour Service

vey, are often employed in posi-
tions which do not make use of
their highest skills. This especial-
ly holds true for women. The Ne-
gro woman's story bears witness
to the truth of the statement.
Local job discrimination also
takes other forms. A student em-
ployed in one campus-area res-
taurant says his employers will
hire Negroes only to wash dishes
and clean floors. "He makes no
bones about it either," the stu-
dent asserts.
No particular background ex-

perience is necessary to get a job
in this restaurant, but race de-
cides what level of employment a
person can get.
Get Manual Jobs
This illustrates a practice of
relegating Negroes to manual and
semi-skilled jobs, with white per-
sons filling more white-collar
posts, regardless of experience.
The Survey also noted evidence of
this practice.
As an employer of Negroes in
all positions, excluding the hos-
pital, the University ranks some-

what low. Academic branches
rank next to last in percentage
employed, with two per cent Ne-
groes. Non-academic areas em-
ploy eight per cent, while city
hospitals (including University
Hospital) employ 21 per cent, as
a group, second only to service
organizations.
In White-Collar Jobs
The picture changes when
white-collar positions only are
considered. Hospitals again rank
second among the types of em-
ployers. with eight per cent of

Collins Shop
STATE and LIBERTY

has exquisite gifts
for the girl graduate,
for the bride-to-be

£

an

Your Discontinued Textbooks

positions filled by Negroes. How-
ever, this time governmental
agencies rank first, with slightly
over nine per cent.
The academic departments of
the University rank third in em-
ploying Negroes, however, with
one and one-half per cent of
white collar posts filled by them.
Non-academic branches are fifth,
with one-half of one per cent.
No type of organization employs
even as many as 10 per cent Ne-
groes in white-collar positions.
However, Negroes comprise only
about eight per cent of the popu-
lation of Ann Arbor.
Few Troubles For Students
Negroes generally fill less than
three per cent of the white-collar
positions in Ann Arbor.
Job discrimination is less im-
portant to Negro students than
to year-round residents. Fewer of
them seek jobs; fewer still indi-
cate any difficulties in getting
them.
This is at least partly due to a
residence hall policy of giving
jobs, such as dining room work-
ers, to students on a first-come,
first-serve basis. Negroes report
no trouble getting jobs in the
residence halls, as long as they
are unfilled.
Agencies Study Discrimination
Ann Arbor has three maior
agencies concerned with discrim-
ination at present: the Human
Relations Commission, the Hu-
man Relations Board, and the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People.
Newest of the trio is the Human
Relations Commission, established
by City Council last summer. The
group's most publicized action to
date occurred in the Brantley
case, mentioned earlier in this
series, in which the commission
stepped in and worked out a solu-
tion satisfactory both to Brantley
and to the sheriff's department.
Investigate Rumors
But it has worked in areas of
farther-reaching concern also,
particularly in housing, which the
Commission's chairman, the Rev..
Henry Lewis, terms the area of
greatest discrimination in Ann
Arbor.
"Discrimination in Ann Arbor
is particularly in housing for Ne-
groes," Rev. Lewis says. Six of the

Choose lovely ...

lingerie

gloves

handkerchiefs

jewelry

dainty slippers

nylon stockir

summer handbags gowns and peigi
. .plus many more attractive and appropriate ite'
that will surely thrill the graduate and the bride-to-b
Remember COLLINS SHOP always strives to offer y
the most outstanding in new giftable items as well
fashions for yourself and we will continue to do tI
not only now, but when you return next foil. Have a ve
nice summery

IgI
rou
as ~
his\ '

are worth real money!

11

if sold to Ulrich's WITH your currently good ones.
YOUR BEST DEAL-FIGURE IT OUT
Ulrich's sell your discontinued books to over
600 college bookstores. This way we get the
highest possible prices for YOU. (At least 25%
of the books used this year will be obsolete or
discontinued next falL.)
-another Ulrich service-

Commission's first 12 cases in-
volved housing discrimination.
The Commission has a housing
committee which has handled
these complaints, and is also in-
vestigating four widely-circulated
rumors in regard to housing.
These rumors are:
1) That landlords do not rent
apartments or rooms to Negroes
or foreign students on an equal
basis with white Americans;
Work Continuing
2) That real estate agents are
trying to create a Negro section
by refusing to sell housing in cer-
tain districts to Negroes;
3) That mortgage loans are not
available to Negroes on the same
basis with whites;
4) That property rented to Ne-
groes is not kept in good condi-
tion by the landlords.
Work in these areas is still con-
tinuing.
"Housing Chief Problem
The Human Relations Board
has also been concerned recently
with housing.
A spokesman for the local chap-
ter of the NAACP also agrees that
housing discrimination is the
chief problem here.
"Very few landlords, excluding
the University, accept Negroes in
multiple dwellings," he said. This
also holds to a lesser degree for
foreign students.
However, he felt some indi-
viduals do rent to Negroes when
places are available. The number
of such landlords eisincreasing at
a fairly steady rate.
'Most Hire on Ability'
Both Rev. Le w is and the
NAACP agreed that employment
discrimination was less important
in Ann Arbor. There is "little if
any discrimination, according
to Rev. Lewis, "far less than in
housing."
"We only know of one large
concern which refuses to hire Ne-
groes," he said. "Most hire on
ability."
The NAACP spokesman noted
some factories do not hire Negroes
at all.
"Not enough young Negroes are
taking advantage of higher edu-
cation opportunities," he said.
"This presents another difficulty.
We have both an interracial and
a racial problem, which must be
studied simultaneously."

11

I

Shop Monday through Saturday 9:30 to

1

m

For

That

Last.

Taste

of

Ann

Arbor

DAILY OFFICIAI'BULIETIN

IL

To those who won't be back
next yea r, we hope you'll stop
to see us when you're back in
Ann Arbor. To those who will
return, .we hope to see you at
CHUCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads is Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
Serving your favorite Beer, Wines and Champagne-
Pizzo Pie Served After 8:00 P.M.
Open From 11 A.M. to 11 P.M.
CLOSED TUESDAYS

I

I

When Important People come to town
.: highlight their visit with luncheon or dinner at the
Corner House - where food, service and surroundings
meet your every wish. Tuesday through Saturday,11:30
to 2:00 and 5:00 to 7:00. Sunday: Dinner. 12:00 to
3:00. May we suggest that you
telephone for reservations?
Veoner J

* ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
*CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
... to take out..
*kTHREE DECKER SANDWICHES
* HOME-MADE PIES
ANGE LO'S RESTAURANT
1100 E. Catherine . , . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. . . . 7 days' a week

S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A blok west of RoekhsmBldg.--NO 1-6056

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT

L

I

2045 PACKARD
Catering at Your Home or Hall

NO 2-1661r
Henry Turner, Prop.

9anu'u4o9"' rI 904
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional

_ -
-- - _._
{

Iq

For A Delicious Dinner

UNIVERSITY PEOPLE HAVE
BEEN DRIVING OVER THIS WAY
SINCE 1920 k

k o.

in Ann Arbor

C
CMlG '

Ital ian dish

(Continued from Page 4),
or change course of study at the end
of the' Spring semester, should make
application for approval of such change
before leaving campus. Applications for
approval are available in the Office of
Veterans' Affairs, 555 Admin. Bldg.-
Students under P.L. 550 (Korea.1.
Bill) and P.L. 634 (Orphans' Bill):, One
set of instructors' signatures showing.
regular class attendance for month of;
May must be obtained and turned in
to Dean's office on or before June 2. A
second set of signatures certifying to
attendance at final examination (or
completion of course work where no
final examination is required) must be
turned in' to Dean's office after last
examination. Monthly Certification, VA
Form VB 7-1996a, may be signed in Of-
fice of Veterans' Affairs, 555 Admin.;
Bldg., between June 2-6, 8:30 a.m. to
3:00 p.m.
To all students having Library books:
1) Students having in their posses-
sion books borrowed from the General
Library or its branches are notified
that such books are due Wed., June 4.
2) Students having special need for
certain books between June 4 and June
10 may retain such books for that
period by renewing them at the Charg-
ing Desk.
3) The names of all students who
have not cleared their records at the
Library by Tues., June 10 will be sent
to the Cashier's Office and theirbcredits
and grades Will be withheld until such
time as said records are cleared in com-
pliance with the regulations of the
Regents.
There will be an International Cen-
ter Tea on Thurs., May 29, 4:00' to 6:00
p.m. at the International Center.
Concerts
Student Re'cital Postponed. The or-
gan recital by Milford Myhre, origin-
ally scheduled for Wed., May 28, has
been postponed until June 20. It will
be held on that date at Hill Aud. at
8:30 p.m.
Student Recital: Shirley Gosling,
mezzo-soprano, who studies voice with
Chase Baromeo, will present a recital
in partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Master of Mu-
sic on Wed., May 28, 8:30 p.m. Aud. A,
Angell Hall. Miss Gosling, who will be
assisted by Paul Moore, pianist, will
perform compositions by Paisiello, Mar-
cello, Schumann, Schubert, Debussy,
Kalmanoff, Ives, and Duke. Open to
the public.
Academic Notices
Room Assignments for Final Exami-
nations in English 23 and 24, held on
Sat., May 31, 1958, 2-5 p.m.
English 23
Gindin, 2440 MH; Greenbaum, 2443
MH; Grollman, 2401 MH; Manierre, 429
MH; Morillo, 215 Econ.; Ney, 2439 MH;
Palmer, 1429 MH; Stanwood, 2402 MH;
Steinhoff, 2402 MR.
English 24
Barrett, 1025 AH; Bennett, 2029 AH;
Billiar, 209 AH; Blake, 447 MH; Bond,
Aud. C AH; Burns, Aud. C AH; Camp,
443 MH; Camu, 102 Econ; Cox, 35 AH;
nrake. 948N MH nuranr 1020 AH: En-

Johnson, 2435 MH; Kennedy, 1412 MH;
Kleinberg, 33 AH; Kleine, 2003 AH; La-
Branche, 1035 AH; Leach, 2014 AH;
Levin, 2042 NS; Lieberman 1408 MH;
Link, 1025 AH; Mathes, 2235 AH; May,
1035 AH; McGhee, NS Aud.; McKinney,
102 Econ; Miller, 1025 AR; Morden, 2225
AH; Nicholson, 35 AH; Oakes, 3023 AH;
O'Donnell, 451 M; Orlin, 2016 AH;
Paskoff, 2215 AH.
Pattison, NS Aud.; Pretzer, NS Aud.;
Rahn, Aud. A. AHRiuand, 2223 AH;
Schutter, Aud. A, AR; Seward 2231 AH;
Shannon, Aud. A, AH; Shaw, Aud. A,
AH;' Sullivan, 2003, AH; TerMaat, 3017
AR; Thygerson, 101 Econ.; Trousdale,
2203 A;" Vance, Aud. A, AR; War-
schausky, 2413 MH; Warsinski, NS
Aud.; Whelan, Aud. A, AR; Wiebe, 2054
NS; Wigod, 2235 AH; Wild, Aud. A, AH;
Wolf, Aud. A, AR; Zietlow, 411 ME.'
Great Books Combination
Barber, 25 AH; Bloom, 25 AH; Gohn
25 AH; Kinney, 25 AR; Wiebe, 2054 NS.
Near Eastern Studies Departmental
Seminar: Wed., May 28, 4:15 p.m., 2029
Angell Hall. Speaker: E. Terry Proth-
roon, "Some Uses and Abuses of Psy-
chology in Area Study." Faculty and
interested graduate students are in-
vited.
School of Business Administration:
Students from other Schools and Col-
leges intending to apply for admission
for the summer session of fall semester
should secure application forms in Rm.
150, School of Bus. Admin. Applica-
tions should be completed as soon as
possible.
Placement Notices
Personnel Requests:
Fabrication de Maquinas, S.A., Mon-
terrey, N.L., Mexico, are looking for a
Mexican student or one who speaks
Spanish to work as a Metalographie
Engineer.
Detroit Harvester Company, Detroit,
Mich. is looking for women with B.A.
or M.A. in Business Administration or
Economics Minor in marketing or
economics with some accounting desir-
able.
Rockville, Md., are looking for a man
to fill the position of City Manager.
Rockvilleheis approximately 16 miles
northwest of Washington, D.C. 5 to 10
years experience on the city manager
level required. Salary: $11,000-$13,000
year.
Interviews:.
Wed., May 28
Timken Roller Bearing Co., Detroit,
Mich. will be at the College of Engi-
neering to interview students with B.S.
or M.E. in application engineering.
Must be U.S. citizens.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.
Summer Placement:
Verily Development Company, is
looking for young ladies to sell Christ-
mas cards. Salary: 10 per cent of sales
or $15.00 per hundred.
For further information on summer
placement contact Mr. Ward D. Peter-
son, S.A.B., Rm. D528.
The Summer Placement Office will be
open Tues., and Thurs. 1:30 p.m. to
5:00 p.m. and Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 12:00,
through June 10, 1958.
Notice to Students Registered With
our Office: If you plan to be in Ann

Dine at WEBER'S

COCKTAILS and DINNERS
For reservations phone HU 2-6171 or HU 2-9020

IZZ

e+
+;
t

Three Miles East of Ypsi on Michigan Ave.

CLOSED SUNDAY

C c
urchefs are ready tprepare A
the most delicious food for your
enjoyment
Q) You will be served the finest in
A J - f - - - A

Deliieous Your Favorite
STEAK, CHICKEN, BEER, WINE,
SEAFOOD and
DIN1NERS I CHAMPAGNE
Try Our Tempting Homemade Pastries
ADJININ--
Webers Holiday Hotel Court

will be served daily in
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
from 11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new modern ovens to give you
the "best tasting pizza in town."
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE

II

OPEN 24 HOURS

CLOSED TUESDAYS

glr 1 10% IL A r% t* 40% L, If fw

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