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May 25, 1958 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1958-05-25

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1958 TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA(

Thirlwind' Alumni Secretary To Retire

By THOMAS HAYDEN
Hawley Tapping, who's
ed 700,000 miles in his 35
at the University, will re-
in June as general secretary
e Alumni Association.
e 69-year-old Tapping, editor
he Michigan Alumnus, will
curtail his travel activities,
ver.
will tour the Far Pacific to
University alumni clubs in
Kong, Tokyo, Manila, Tai-
and Korea.
Described as 'Whirlwind'
iends say this sort of thing
pical of Tapping. He's been
ibed as a "whirlwind with
tiorn." .
ey also say he's a man who's
le his own breaks." And con-
ing the series of bizarre
s which featuredhis younger
* the commentary might well
rue.
r instance, it was only
igh a very curious chain of
bs that Tapping went into
paper work, the career which
tually opened the door to his
-nt Job.
Almost a Lawyer
came darn near being a law-
he reflected.
pping received his law de-
here in 1916 and intended to
ato the field of journalism,
ng been convinced by two
s of reporting for the Peoria,
Transcript,
wever, following'graduation,.
paper jobs were at a mini-
. So a disappointed Tapping
ed towards law as a second
ce. He drove. downtown in
La, headed for a law career.
Passed Offices
aving his car a block from
destination, Tapping was
A to walk past the offices of
Peoria Journal for which he
worked summers during his
chool years. There he noticed
lletin on the window which,
feet, told of the purchase of
Transcript by Tapping's old
the owner of the Journal.
oking in the Journal's win-
Tapping saw his former
oyer, and, on a whim, entered
building to congratulate, him
he purchase.
was promptly handed the
f city editor.
;was quite a break and quite
ock," Tapping said. His sal-
3mounted to $35 per week.
Called by War
year after signing as city edi-
rapping felt the urge to serve
ountry in World War II.
eing blind without my glasses
weighing 127 pounds, I didn't
much of a chance, however."
ten an Army friend-suggested
an by which he rose to the
of captain in two years. The
involved'a simple method for
ting on an eye examination.
e told me to trail in with a

group," .Tapping said, "and stay
at the rear of the group, so that I
could memorize the lines on the
eye chart .by listening to others
read them."
Passed Exam
"When I.got up there," he re-
lated, "everything was hazy but
I stumbled through the first three
or four lines and passed the
exam."
After the war, Tapping returned
to Michigan where he joined the
Grand Rapids Press and became
state editor (1921). His third
break was not long in coming..
The city editor of the Ann Ar-
bor News fell sick and Tapping
was called from Grand Rapids to
fill the vacancy for a period of
two weeks.
Legend has it that the Ann Ar-
bor correspondent for the Booth
newspaper chain became "inca-
pacitated" one night during Tap-
ping's brief tenure in Ann Arbor.
That night the University's
Board of Regents announced the
gift of. the first unit of the Law
Quadrangle.
"The Booth correspondent
flubbed the story, and as a result,
the Booth chain hired me as Ann.
Arbor correspondent," Tapping
said.
While in Ann Arbor (1922-23),
Tapping "peddled a lot of yarns"
for the Booth chain. Most of his
stories "interpreted the news
through the eyes of faculty schol-
ars."
City Important
Ann Arbor grew to be an im-
portant source of news during the
year Tapping served as the Booth
reporter. In 1923, the Associated
Press sent a c.orrespondent to the
town.
"Then I knew the Booth job
was washed up here," Tapping
said. It looked more and more like
he would be-without an Ann Ar-
bor job.
And he probably would have
been were it not for University
President Marion Burton, one of
Tapping's major contacts in his
newspaper duties.
Largely because of Burton's
recommendation, Tapping got the
newly-created job of field secre-
tary in the Alumni Offices in 1923.
During those days Wilfred B.
IHC Names
New Offic ers
The Inter-House Council has
recently announced its new com-
mittee chairmen for next fall.
Appointed were: Judiciary, Bor-
en Chertkov, '60; House Services,
Arthur Brown, '61; IHC-Assembly
show, James Kappler, '59Ed.; Pub-
licity and Public Relations co-
chairmen, William Riley, '61A&D,
and David Hertle, '60E.

CITIZENS:
Investiate
Integration
(Continued from Page 1)
vention and Negro Baptist groups
which have the same doctrines.
Despite the similarity of outlook,
separate identical church hier-
archies exist, from top to bottom.
Such situations create no strong
racial antagonisms, but do cause
feelings of resentment among Ne-
groes and contribute to tensions.
However, some Negroes consider
the amelioration of these condi-
tions merely a matter of time.
As one phrased it, "Things have
changed so fast that the churches
haven't had time to catch up yet."
On a more personal level, "in-
cidents" of various kinds occur.
The most publicized in the last
year has been the Brantley case,
in which a Negro was beaten by
two sheriff's deputies after being
stopped for a traffic violation.
The Human Relations Commis-
sion looked into the case, which
ended with the sheriff's depart-
ment paying Brantley's hospital.
and medical expenses, and dis-
missing one of the two deputies
involved in the affair.
In another incident, a Negro
University student and a white
woman were refused a marriage
license by a Ypsilanti clerk.
The couple were able to pur-
chase one elsewehere and nothing
came of the incident, but their ex-
perience serves to indicate a latent
source of discrimination.

Regents Make Faculty,'
Committee Selections

Theatre
Notes

-Daily-Ian. MacNiven
ALUMNUS--T. Hawley Tapping, general secretary of the Uni-
versity's Alumni Association and editor of the Michigan Alumnus,
is caught in one of his rare sedentary moments. Tapping's duties
have taken him through nearly every spot which has a Univer-
sity club, for an estimated travelling distance of 700,000 miles.

The University Board of Regents
yesterday approved a total of 19
faculty and committee appoint-
ments.
Nine appointments were to the
University faculty, one to the Flint
College faculty, and nine to various
committees.
Three visiting professors re-
ceived appointments to the facul-
ty of the Law School: Profs. Luigi
Gorla of the University of Pisa,
Robert Meisenholder of the Uni-
versity of Washington, and Frank
Kennedy of the State University
of Iowa.
Two Posts Approved
Two appointments to the facul-
ty of the literary college were ap-
proved. Prof. Harold King of Cor-
nell University was appointed as-
sistant professor of English and
Alfred Hendel of the research
staff at Princeton University was
appointed a visiting professor of
physics.
James Taylor, personnel general
manager for Proctor & Gamble
Co., was named professor of in-
dustrial relations in the business
adminmstration school.
In the engineering college, the
Regents approved the appoint-
ment of Fred Walton as tempor-
ary professor of marine engineer-
ing and Murray Miller as assist-
ant professor of electrical eng-
gineering.
Prof. Paton Approved
Prof. William Paton of Michi-
gan State University was approved

as associate professor of business
administration.
Ralph Hiatt, chief of the an-
tenna laboratory at the Air Force
Cambridge Research Center was
appointed research physicist in the
Engineering Research Institute.
Nine committee appointments
were also approved. Profs. Jack'
Borchardt and Kenneth Jones
were appointed to the Great Lakes
Research Institute Council. Profs.
Glenn Edmonson, George Hay,
and Alan Macnee were named to
the Engineering Research Coun-
cil.
Council Post Given
Sue Rockne, '60, was approved
student representative to the De-
velopment Council Board of Direc-
tors. She was named to a two-year
term, ending June 30, 1960, and
will succeed Janet Neary, '58.'
Three appointments were made
to the Board of Governors of
Religious Affairs. Profs. Hirsch
Hootkins and Lawrence Brockway
will succeed themselves for four
years, and Albert Logan will suc-
ceed himself for a two-year period.
r~

"Candida," the next production
of the Drama Season, was George
Bernard Shaw's first successful
show.
The romantic comedy, - which
first starred Katharine Cornell on
Broadway, is reputed to be one of
the most. difficult pieces for an
actor to execute successfully. It
requires a kind of sympathy mixed
with humor in its presentation,
qualities which make it one of
Shaw's most popular and "slickest"
plays today, although it was orig-
inally written in 1894.
The eccentric playwright, who
called himself a "professor of na-
tural psychology," is a theatrical
legend himself. He was prophet,
clown, vegetarian, Socialist and
a great believer in dramatic real-
ism as opposed toromance.
One of the keenest intellects of
his era, Shaw was so vain that he
surrounded himself with various
photographs, portraits and busts
of himself. He is best remembered
for "Pygmalion," recently present-
ed as "My Fair Lady" and the
serious drama "Saint Joan."

Shaw of the Alumni Association
worked alone. But, taking over his
new duties, Tapping became "the
real leg man"
He travelled, often with Mrs.
Tapping, approximately 30,000
miles a year at first greeting-
alumni clubs everywhere.
One of the earliest trips was
also the longest - 69 days by
train to "every place west of the
Mississippi having a University
club," Tapping said.

In 1929 he was appointed gen-
eral secretary of the Association
upon the retirement of Shaw.
In recent years, his annual
mileage has shrunk to "only"
about 15,000 miles.
When Tapping took over lead-
ership of the Association 29 years
ago, approximately 20 alumni,
clubs were actually functioning.
Today Tapping can point to a roll
call of nearly 250 clubs. He has
personally met with 200 of them.

BONISTEEL, PIERPONT, LEWIS DONATE:
Gifts, Grants of $683,000 Accepted by Regents

BRING YOUR BOOKS
to the
STUDENT BOOK EXCHANGE
On the Diag. or SAB Basement
every afternoon during,

-,,Il

OPENS TOMORROW 8:30 P.M.

University Regent Roscoe O.
Bonisteel and vice-presidents Wil-
bur K. Pierpont and James A.
Lewis were among the contribu-
tors to a total of $683, 233.27 ac-
cepted Friday by the Regents.
Bonisteel and Pierpont. gave
$250 for the Baguio Institute Book
Fund. Lewis contributed $100 to
the student emergency aid for
men fund.,
Largest sum accepted was a to-
tal of $505,014.88 from the estate
of Stanley Dickinson McGraw of
Detroit.
Japan Studies Aided
Carnegie Corporation of New
York gave $25,000 towards sup-
port of the Japanese studies cen-
ter.
Two grants totaling $25,800
were accepted from the Ford
Foundation. One grant of $17,-
000 is for an inter-disciplinary
study group which will undertake
preliminary planning for research
on the -impact of public relations
activities. The second grant of
$8,000 will provide grants-in-aid
for students working in Near and
Far Eastern studies.
The Regents accepted $14,102.46
from the sale of common stock re-
ceived from Standish Backus for
the Standish Backus Memorial
Scholarship Fund.
ACE Begins Fund
The American Council on Edu-
cation gave $13,500 to establish
a fund for the survey of dental
education in the United States.
Aaron Mendelson Memorial
Trust gave $12,000 in two grants,
$7,500 for neurosergery and $4,-
500 for allergy research.
Grants totaling $10,945 were ac-
cepted for the University Cancer
Research Institute, $10,000 from
the' American Cancer Society. A
total of $790 was given by several
donors in memory of Thomas
Marston, an architect who died
April 27 in University Hospital.
Pharmacology Fellowship
A grant of $9,000 was accepted
from Parke, Davis and Co. for fel-
lowships in the pharmacology de-
partment. The grant will be paid
in four installments.
To develop syllabi for six courses
in three major areas of in-service
training for medical assistants,

the W.K. Kellogg Foundation gave
$7,200.
Esso Research and Engineering
Co. gave $5,460 to continue basic
research in the chemical and met-
allurgical engineering department
dealing with gas phases.
Convair Gives Subscription
Convair Division, General, Dy-
namics Corporation gave $5,000
for one year's subscription to the
industry program of the engineer-
ing .college.
The Regents also accepted
grants totaling $5,000 for the In-
stitute of Human Adjustment.
Mead, Johnson and Co. has giv-
en $5,000 for study of an anti-
histamine compound.
A grant of $5,000 to be used to
help support the hospital school
was accepted from Forney W. Cle-
ment Foundation, supported by
the Michigan Kiwanis. clubs;.
Summer Project Aided
Grants of $1,300 each were ac-
cepted from Smith, Kline and
French laboratories, and from the
Smith, Kline and French Founda-
tion to be used in the study of
bronchial dilatory drugs and to
finance a summer research pro-
ject in pharmacognosy.
The Regents accepted $2,500
from Phillips Petroleum Company
for a fellowship.
Continental Oil Company gave
a total of $2,500 with $1,900 for
fellowships in marketing research

and $600 as an unrestricted grant
to the business administration
school.
From Danforth Foundation, the
Regents accepted $2,150 to be used
for a workshop on religious coun-
seling.
Law School Gets Donations
Several donors gave $2,100 for
a study of methods for improving
conveying procedure and improv-
ing marketing of land titles by
the Law School.
Henry B. Steinbach foundation
gave $2,000 for intestinal re-
search. The nursing school alum-
ni association gave an additional
$2,000.
Friends of the late John Wolav-
er gave a total of $1,949.27 to be
used as scholarship funds for the
music school.
dU' Women Donate Money
University Women of Detroit
donated $1,550 for the Sanders
Scholarship for Henderson House.
To help find the cause and cure
of myasthenia gravis, a grant of
$1,500 was given by the Myas-
thenia Gravis Foundation.
American Cyanamid Company,
Lederle Laboratories division, gave
$1,200 for the Lederle Medical
Student research fellowships.
With $1,000 received from a
dinner given last October honor-
ing the editor of the Bay City
Times, the Glenn MacDonald
journalism scholarship has been
created.

Sperry Gyroscope Company of
Great Neck, N.Y., gave $800 for
the Sperry Gyroscope Fellowship
in electrical engineering.
A monthly payment of $650 on
a research project was given by
the United States Vitamin Cor-
poration of New York City.
Foundry Educational Founda-
tion of Cleveland gave $600 for
two scholarships, Charitable Re-
search Foundation of Wilmington,
Del., gave $500 for the 'Isola Den-
man Robinson Scholarship Fund,
and Trinity Hospital of Detroit
gave $500 to establish the Trinity
Hospital Scholarship.
The Regents also accepted 19
other gifts and grants of $100 and
over.

YOUR BOOKS.

4I

finals.

Get a FAIR price for

The University of Michigan Drama Season
presents
CARMEN MATHEWS
in Bernard Shaw's most popular comedy
"CNDDA
with
WESLEY ADDY PHILIP TONGE
and DICK DAVALOS
ONE WEEK ONLY
Evenings at 8:30 P.M.
Mon. thru Thurs $3., $2.50, $2
Fri. and Sat., $3.50, $3., $2.50
Matinees at 2:30 P.M.
Thurs. and Sat. $2.25, $1.75
Box Office Open Mon. thru Sat. 1TOA.M.-8 :30 P.M.
COMING: Basil Rathbone and Betty Field in "Separate Tables'
Don Ameche in "Holiday for Lovers"
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

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- -A
r A N A R R A N M
ANARO ~AN~PRACTICAL
I Considerutionu

As you get to REALLY know your University town , . . the
local shops . . . your favorite "spots" . . you'll find yourself
more and more regarding Ann Arbor as your second "home."
And part of getting "home-bred" is, of course, the practi-
cal consideration. of arranging for thoughtful, safe, and economi-
cal handling of your financial affairs.
Why not make it a point to stop in at one of our two
convenient campus offices soon? We're situated both on State
Street and on South University, with a complete line of banking
services for you. We have our OWN "Michigan Tradition," you
know, and we'd like YOU to be a part of it!

Who isn't at exam time? But the
.Oog days will soon be over and
(so they tell us) a new era awaits.
When that breathing spell comes,
maybe you should take a glance at
the future. Have you given much
thought to financial planning?
Probably not. That's why we sug-

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
..,,ACCOUNTING, Elementory..........$1.25
....ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS .. 1.50
-BUSINESS & GOVERNMENT - 1.75
....,..BUSINESS LAW 1.50
....,BUSINESS MANAGEMENT................. 1.75
......CORPORATION FINANCE.- 1.25
_ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE U.S. 1.50
,,~....ECONOMICS, Principles of............ 1.50
, .ECONOMICS, Readings In- . 1.7S
....LABOR PROBLEMS &
ITRADE UNIONISM _^.. _- . 1,50
......MARKETING, An introduction......... 1.50
.,.MONEY AND BANKING..,........... 1.25
-STATISTICAL METHODS ._ 1.50
.....STATISTICIANS, Tables for............ 1.00
ENGLISH
......AMERICAN LITERATURE - - 1.50
--ENGLISH GRAMMAR... . 1.25
ENGLISH LITERATURE to Dryden..... 1.75
...ENGLISH LITERATURE since Milton 1.75
* -....JOURNALISM, New Surrey of.......... 1.75
..,,,..SHAXSPEARE'S Plays (Outlines)..1.00
.,,,..,.WORLD LITERATURE (Vol. 1)....... 1.50
,......WORLD LITERATURE (Yol. Il)....... 1.50
GOVERNMENT & POLITICS
.....GOVERNMENT, American .... 1.23
..,.INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS - 1.50
.....POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00
HISTORY
.....AMER. COL. & REVOL. HISTORY 1.25
.,.....ANCIENT HISTORY -- 1.00
:..ANCIENT, MED., & MOD. History 1.25
.....ENGLAND, History of. - .1.25
....EUROPE, 1500-1848 1.00
......EUROPE, since 181 ........... ......... 1.25
......MIDDLE AGES, History of............... 1.25
'--RUSSIA, History of.........,............. 1.50
.......UNITED STATES to 1865 _.. 1.00
.....,UNITED STATES since 1865 '........ 1.25
.....WORLD since 1914, History of....... 1.75
MATHEMATICS & ENGINEERING

{...,GEOMETRY. Analytic.. 1.25
....-GEOMETRY, Plane ...,. .....--.. 1.25
.......LOGARITHMIC & Tig. Tables........ .75
......TRIG., Plane & Sphericol................ 1.25
MODERN LANGUAGES
....FRENCH GRAMMAR 1.25
-GERMAN GRAMMAR 1.25
.......SPANISH GRAMMAR . 1.25
PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY &
EDUCATION
-EDUCATION, History of.... .... 1.00
.....PHILOSOPHY, An Introduction......... 1.50
.,....PHILOSOPHY, Handbook in Hist. of 1.50
.......PHILOSOPHY, Readings in 1.50
...,,..PSYCHOLOGY, Child-1.50
......PSYCHOLOGY, Educational - 1.00
,,.....PSYCHOLOGY, General ...1.25
-...PSYCHOLOGY, Readings in 1.75
SCIENCE
.....ATLAS OF HUMAN ANATOMY.. 2.00
....BACTERIOLOGY 1.85
......BIOLOGY - 1.25
.......BOTANY 1.00
..,...CHEMISTRY, First Year College... 1.50
.,,,,..CHEMISTRY, Organic ..... 1.75
.......CHEMISTRY, Physical 1.25
....CHEMISTRY PROBLEMS .... 1.25
......GEOLOGY, Principles of 1.25
......PHYSICS, First Year College............ 1.00
..,,,,PHYSICS without Mathematics...... 1.25
,-ZOOLOGY, General 1.25
SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY
.....ANTHROPOLOGY, General 1.50
.,,....SOCIOLOGY, Principles of .... 1.50
....SOCIOLOGY, Readings in ... 1.75
SPEECH, ART & MUSIC
......ART, History of........, ........ .......,.. _-... 1.50
.....MUSIC, History of. - 1.25
.....PLAY PRODUCTION 1.50
......SPEECH ......1.50
STUDY AIDS
......DOCUMENTED PAPERS 1.00

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