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February 12, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-12

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__THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. I

'U' CONTROLLER:

Lee 'Coordinates' Business Staffs

By LEWIS COBURN

I

A man who often thinks in terms
of hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars and who has delivered and
signed checks for as much as
$800,000, University Controller Gil-
bert L. Lee, Jr., is in charge of
seven major University business
departments.
Lee noted that he doesn't actu-
ally see the money since major
transactions are made by check
and cash is handled by the Uni-
versity cashier-one of Lee's sub-
ordinates.
In fact, the University business-
man said his main job is to "co-
ordinate" the "fiscal and budget-
ary" activities of the staffs he
heads.

-Daily-Eric Arnold
UNIVERSITY CONTROLLER--Gilbert L. Lee, Jr., directs seven
major business departments. In his capacity as controller he notes
that his most important job is to "co-ordinate" the "fiscal and
budgetary" activities of the staffs he heads. Although he doesn't
actually handle money, a function of the University cashier, he
has delivered and signed checks for up to $800,000.
NOTED BRITISH WRITER:
Graves To Read Own Poetry
In Talk at Rackham Today

Supervises Payroll,
In addition to the cashier's
office, Lee has supervisory respon-
sibility for the accounting, pay-
roll, disbursement, purchasing, and
internal audit departments and
the business department of the.
Engineering Research Institute.
Working closely with University
Vice-President in charge of busi-
ness Wilbur Pierpont, Lee observed
that much paperwork crosses his
desk and that one of his jobs is
to keep it "flowing.",
Noting with a smile that "20
percent" of the people he meets
ask him what the difference is be-
tween a "controller"-his title-
and a "comptroller," Lee turned to
a dictionary and pointed out that
the words are synonomous.
No 'Profit'
Turning to a more serious ques-
tion, Lee said the major difference
between working for a public in-
stitution and a private firm is that
the institution is not, concerned
with "making a profit."
He noted that while the Univer-
sity's endowment of $25,000,000 is
"rather large" for a state-support-
ed school, it must still depend on
the State Legislature for most
financial support since endowment
fund earnings are usually "ear-i
marked" for such things as re-
search projects,
Lee observed that there is "vir-
tually no endowment for general
spending."
Before joining the University
business staff in .1951, Lee was a
member of a local accounting firm.
He graduated from Michigan
State University in 1941 after
which he served with air force
training command, emerging in
1946 as a lieutenant colonel. After
the war, Lee earned his masters
degree in business administration
at the University.

Steigerwalt
Named Head
Prof. Albert Steigerwalt of the
business administration school will
be chairman of the fourth annual
Midwestern Conference on Busi-
ness History to be held Feb. 15 in
the State Historical Society of
Wisconsin Building in Madison,
Wisconsin.
Development of public utility
regulation will be the subject of
the conference.
Forest McDonald, chief of the
American History Research Center
at Madison will speak at the
morning session on "Samuel Insull
and the Movement for State Utility
Regulatory Commissions." Prof.
Martin Glaeser of the University
of Wisconsin will moderate a dis-
cussion following the talk.
E. Hardy Luther, general man-
agement training supervisor, Con-
sumers Power Co., Jackson, Mich.,
will discuss "The Impact of Regu-
lation of 'Public Utilities in Michi-
gan" at the afternoon meeting.
The discussion following this paper
will be moderated by Nicholas Les-
selyoung, Wisconsin's public serv-
ice commissioner.
Chapter Elects
New Officers
Election of officers for the Uni-
versity's chapter of the American
Society of Public Administrators,
a part of the Institute of Public
Administration was held Monday.
Paul L. McCauley, Grad., was
elected president and William L.
Steude, Grad., vice-president. John
T. Kehoe, Grad., is the chapter's
new secretary, and Moop Young
Lee, Grad., the new treasurer. The
new Graduate Student Council
Representative is Myron J. Medin,
Jr., Grad.
These offices are for the spring
semester.

How does one evaluate the work-
ings of an .educational program?
SGC is now in the process of such
an evaluation which is a result
of one of its regulations. According
to the 1949 Student Affairs regula-
tion, "Recognition or permission
to reactivate will not be granted
a group which prohibits member-
ship in the organization because of
race, religion, or color."
In his 1952 letter to the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs, Presi-
dent Hatcher stated, "We believe
that the processes of education
and personal and group convic-
tions will bring us forward faster,
and on a sounder basis (in the
removal of fraternity and sorority
membership restrictions), than
... methods of coercion."
Acting on the premise that any
governing body Las an obligation
to know how its regulations are
working out, the Council has pass-
ed a motion which establishes a
committee ". .. to study progress
made in recent years in the area
of fraternity and sorority mem-
bership restrictions and to report
back to the Council . . . on the
facts and on possible Council pol-
icy in this area."
The policy as suggested by Pres-
ident Hatcher is essentially an
educational philosophy. Many SOC
members believe in such a policy,
but mere belief is not always
enough if change is really desired.
Thus, the Council wishes to know
if this subscription has effected
change, i.e., where does SOC now
stand in relation 'to the conditions
which existed in 1952? The ques-
tion is, has the educational process
worked?
Certainly any educational policy
is open to interpretation. Rob
Trost and Marilyn Houck, empha-
sizing the work of IFC and Pan-
hellenic in the area of written
bias-claus removal, have stated

that much progress has be
achieved. They point to statisti
which verify the statement. Hoa
ever, Peter Eckstein;author of tV
motion feels that more facts a
needed than those shown by stat
tics. Unwritten restrictions as I
posed upon a local chapter by i
national are just as important
molding action as are writte
clauses. National interpretation
determined by practice.
It is the intent of the motion
determine the relationship of ti
1949 regulation, and thus the pos
tion of SOC, to the realities of th
1958 situation. It is intended pur
ly as a basis for re-examination
Council policy. It is illogical
think that in passing the motio
the Council wishes to coerce an
local chapter into pledging an
one who is not wanted by ti
organization.
In providing for a committee
four members of Panhellenic an
IFC and three SGC members, mo
of the investigation will be hand
led by the IFC and Panhelleni
The Council encourages this,
How this investigation will 1
carried out will of course bed e
termined by tle committee. A
educational philosophy affec
many things and it would be
rather narrow interpretation
the policy to attempt to find ti
complete results in one set
statistics. Attitudes of local an
national fraternities must ther
fore be ascertained through con
tact with them.
The motion calls for a study
determine possible Council polic
Perhaps the present education
policy should be more active. Pe
haps it is proving to be more thE
adequate. In any case it definite
affects an SGC regulation ant
any governing body has an obl
gation to know the effects of i
legislation.

(Paid Advertisement)
COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE:
SGC Views Bias Practice
'For Possible Policy Move

I

The career of Robert Graves,
who speaks at 4:10 today in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, has been called
a portrait of versatility.
Born in London in 1895, Graves
has gained world prominence as
a novelist, poet and critic. Ac-
cording to Prof. Herbert Barrows
of the English department, the re-
markable fact about Graves is
that "he has done so many differ-
ent things and done them all well."
Graves postponed his Oxford
education during World War I to
enlist in the Royal Welch Fusiliers.
The army environment served to
Travel Talks
To Start Soon
The Burton Memorial Trave-
logue series will open for the third
consecutive year at 8:30 p.m. Feb.
20 in Hill Auditorium with "Paris
and the Riviera."
Robert Mallet and Thayer
Soule, who have narrated the
series since it began two years
ago, will return for the 1958 pro-
gram of five lectures.
Following "Paris and the Rivi-
era" the University Oratorical As-
sociation will continue the Burton
lectures each successive Thurs-
day evening for four weeks there-
after at the same time.
only include France's famed "City
of Light," but will also take the
audience down the Route Napo-
leon from Grenoble in southern
France to Monaco and the Riviera
plus scenes of peasant life and
customs, the chateau country and
the French Alps.

stimulate his writing of poetry on
which his reputation today ulti-
mately rests. Prof. Barrows notes
that "currently many people con-
sider Graves as one of the best
practicing English poets."
In 1929 Graves moved to the
island of Majorca off the coast of
Spain, where he established a press
and published many of his own
works.
At that time his critical works
began to gain recognition along
with some of his most .famous
novels. Prominent among the lat-
ter is "I, Claudius," one of several
unusual treatments of early Rom-
an life which have been described
by critics as "brilliant, if eccen-
tric."
In today's program, Graves will
read and comment on his poetry.

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