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May 10, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-10

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THE ICHIGAN DAILYSA

EXPAND OVER YE A RS:

Religious Activities Mark Centennial Year

15

NOTE: This is the see-
ries of articles dealing
story and activities of
ous groups.)
ATHY MOORE
marks the end of the
of organized religious
Lie University.
eligious groups began
member, independent
"istian association and
into 22 separate de-
I organizations co-
7the University-aff il-
of Religious Affairs.
established as a secu-
supported ' institution,
by has always stressed
,nce of religious ex-
he life of its students.
o faculty, members of
ty of Michigania,,be-
7, and eleven of the
ents were clergymen.
t Group Fails
attempt at student re-
ity did not begin un-
ever, when the, Union
society of Inquiry was
The group's purpose
e in Christian studies,
gram proved unsuc-
was discontinued in
the first successful
ably the first college
e country, was found-
y called the Michigan

Christian Association, it changed
its name to the Student's Chris-
tian Association in 1860 in antici-
pation of a co-educational pro-
gram.
When women were admitted to
the University and the SCA in
1870, problems arose. The nation-"
al YMCA was reluctant about
sponsoring a co-educationtal
group. The issue was finally
settled by separating the men and
the women into YMCA and
YWCA groups, correlated by the
parent SCA organization.
Initiated Student Services
In the years before World War
I the SCA was the only large, ac-
tive student group. It initiated
many of the services available to
students today, including distri-
bution of the "M" Handbook for
freshmen and a Student Direc-
tory,, establishment of room-list-
ing and empfoyment bureaus and
sponsorship of a freshman orien-
tation week.
With the rapid growth of SCA
the need for buildings and facili-
ties became apparent. In 1891
Newberry Hall (now Kelsey Mu-
seum) was dedicated, and the
present Lane Hall was built in
1911.
The start of World War. I
marked the beginning of the de-
cline of student interest in SCA.
It had transferred emphasis from
religious study and activity to its
many secular projects. These pro-
jects and campus. services were,
slowly redistributed to other
groups, notably the League and
the Michigan Union.
Denominational Groups Increase
Another sign of decentralization
on the campus was the growth of
denominational student religious
groups. With no projects to work
on, less participation'in its nonde-
nominational programs becoming
apparent and a lack of funs
further hampering its activiti s,
the future of SCA looked dim.'
As the SCA adjusted to the
changing patterns of campus life,
however, a new program emerged
during the 1920's. New services re-
placed the, old ones, including the
establishment of English language
courses for foreign students, the
Fresh-Air Camp for neglected
boys and the Freshman Rendez-
vous program. Freshman Rendez-
vous is the only campus service
project which has remained under
religious sponsorship. It is now
sponsored annually by the Office
of Religious Affairs.
Religion School Established
In'1908 a school of religion was.
established. Although student re-
sponse to the non-credit courses
in religious studies was good, the
school closed with the beginning
of World War I. The war and a
lack of endowments were respon-
sible for its failure.

STUUENTS GATHER--Representatives from eacn o fte campus
religious groups which deals with inter-denominational activities
meet to discuss common problems. The SRA Council coordinates
the programs of these organizations.

A second and more successful
attempt was begun in 1923. An
independent educational. institu-
tion, the Michigan School of Re-
ligion was located in the old New-
berry Hall. It, too, failed, due to
an unfortunate series of events.
The majority of the nucleus of,
organizers either died or left the
University within a short period
of time. This left the school with-
out qualified direction and it had
to discontinue its program in 1926.
The second experiment in
schools of religion led directly to
the development of the present
inter-departmental degree pro-
gram in religious studies.
Institute Religious Counseling
In .1929 the University institut-
ed a religious counseling service
for its students. The University
Counselor in Religious Education
co-operated with the SCA in
many matters, but the division of
responsibility for student religious
affairs weakened the emphasis
placed on campus religious acti-
vity.
The religious picture was. re-
unified in 1936 when the SCA
transferred its property and re-
sponsibilities to the University.
Its name was changed to the Stu-
dent Religious Association so that
the organization could include re-
ligious groups of all faiths.
The SRA's initial programs fea-
tured lectures in religion, small
group activities, and intellectually
stimulating discussions at Lane
Hall.
Objections Raised
The SRA Council was estab-
lished to co-ordinate the programs
of the denominational groups.
Each group was represented on
the council which worked on in-
ter-denominational activities.

The denominational groups
raised objections to the existence
of the Council because its pro-
grams were often confused with
the programs of the non-denomi-
national SRA.
Dissatisfaction with the organ-
ization and programs of the SRA
and the SRA Council led to the
establishment of the Office of
Religious Affairs in 1956. There
are no longer any Uniiversity-
sponsored religious activities, 'but
the University continues to en-
courage others to sponsor them.
The Office of Religious Affairs
concentrates on coordinating the
denominational groups to increase
the effectiveness of their indi-
vidual programs.
Blatt, Students
Present Opera
Prof. Joseph Blatt of the music
school, along with nine of his
students, will participate in "Opera
Scenes," the final program of the
Upper Peninsula Concert Series
May 11-15.
Prof. latt is conductor of the
University Symphony Orchestra
and is also director of opera pro-
duction here. He was formerly
assistant conductor of the Metro-
politan Opera Company. The pro-
fessor has also gained recognition
for his English translation of 14
famous operas, including "Madame
Butterfly," "Hansel and Gretel"
and "La Boehme."
"Opera Scenes" are arranged by
the school of music and the Uni-
versity extension service. Excerpts
from "Don Giovanni," "The Merry'
Wives of Windsor," "Samson and
Delilah" and "The Masked Ball"
will be presented.

BY ACTOR:
Tennessee
Williams
Acclaim ed
By JEAN HARTWIG
"As a person, Tennessee Williams
is one of the most humble, gentle
and genuinely kind persons that I
have ever met," Alan Mixon, one
of the actors featured in "A View
from the Bridge," commented.
The play, the first of five pro-
ductions to be presented in the
annual Drama Season, will run
through next week beginning Mon-
day in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater. Nightly performances will
be given at 8:30 p.m. through
Saturday with matinees at 2:30
p.m. on Thursday and Saturday.
Mixon, who has appeared in
"Garden District" and "Sweet Bird
of Youth," both by Williams, added
that the playwright usually stays
away from rehearsals for about a
week, but is finally there a "great
deal of the time.
Perfectionist When Working
"When working, he's a perfec-
tionist. He works very hard, knows
what he wants and insists on
getting it. He makes sure that
what he says in his plays is being
presented the way he intended,"
Mixon said.
From the South himself, Mixon
is very fond of Williams' plays
because the author understands
"completely" the' Southern people
he writes about. According to
Mixon, his works are "some of the
finest everwritten" because they
capture a universal quality, while
portraying specific people.
Mixon, who comes from Miami,
Fla., grew up in an atmosphere of
show business. His family origi-
nally had a touring show company
and later formed a circus in which
Mixon performed on the, trampo-
line, trapeze and tightrope.
No Formal Training
Studying-under George Keathley
in Miami's Studio M for about
four years, Mixon never attended
a theatrical school. "I just started
working, in shows-the best prac-
tice, anyway," he smiled.
While appearing in the Miami
premier "Sweet Bird .of Youth,"
he was asked by Audrey Wood,
Williams' agent, to come to New
York. There he appeared in a tele-
vision production as a Southern
soldier of the Civil War and played
in Chicago and on tour during the
summer with Luther Adler in "A
View from the Bridge."
Discussing his role of Rodolpho
in "A View from the Bridge," he
described the character as a
"young, happy-go-lucky, , charm-
ing, naive, likeable Italian" who
comes to live with a family in
America, and falls in love with the
adopted niece.,

ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
Best Foreign Picture
of the Year!
"BEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR!"
-Golden David Award
("Ialian Academy Award")
"THE BEST!"
-Newsweok
"GREAT!"
-Herld Tribune
'REMARKABLE!"
-POOt
"SUPERB!"
.-CUe
"A HIT!"
..Daily New$
"RADIANT!"
-Journal Amrtricoo
"TRIUMPH !"
-World.-tle.Su
"SPLENDID!",
mirror
"MAGNIFICENT!"
-sat. Review
DN DE LAURENTi $ r""^
pre s. :. .
C ItUL1ETTA _
MA$1NA C a
Directed by FEDERICO FELLIN)
PDIAL NO8-6416
CONTINUOUS FROM 1 P.M.
SATURDAY and SUNDAY

LANE HALL
... ample facilities
Personnel
cape Inury
Air Crash
lane carrying seven research-
nd technicians from the Uni-
y's Engineering Research In-
e at Willow Run Airport
a spectacular crash landing
iarlotte, N.C. Thursday.
one aboard the plane was
ed as it was forced to make a
landing with a broken nose
L. While still in the air the
noticed that the wheel had
in a half-lowered position.
plane circled the airport for
hours before the landing was
ipted.
e University personnel aboard
Mane were: George England,
.arl C. Sibson, George Zissis,
Dute, Anthony J. LaRocca,
S Fisher and Harold T. An-
s.
DIAL NO 2-3136
FROM
HERMAN WOUK'S
GREAT NOVEL
'Majiorie
Womnsta
SWARNERCOLOR~
The picture that is'
the story of every
young girl who ever
had to choose between
y decency and desire!

Read and Use Michigan Daily Classifieds

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WHAT IS A JAPANESE BANK?
r., .KR(OH#ER. Yen. Den
WAYNE STATE U.
WHAT IS A SOUTH AMERICAN MARE?

WHAT HA N f
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Exchange areas served by General Telephone
are shown in dark tone.

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(( ')) (( l

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We'ure proud t6 be No. 2

I

i(ENNETH DETRO.
INDIANA TECHNICAL COIL.

Chile Filly

The people who live in the United
States have more of almost every-
thing-including telephones.
.Therefore it's possible, in such a fab-
ulous country, to be the No. 2 com-
munications system in size-and still
have a great opportunity for service
and growth.

of 1,000 new customers every work.
ing day-partly because so many of
the areas we serve are suburban
areas, which are the fastest-growing
areas in this country.
All of which confronts us with many
challenges.
If we cannot be the largest, we can
surely aspire to be the finest-to do
whatever we do better than it has
been done before.

wHAT'S A MINK-UPHQLSTERED CARRIAGE?
DAVID DULANSEY; Furry Surrey
U. OF PITTSBURGH

IF SILENCE WERE REALLY GOLDEN, fishermen
would be up to their hip boots in cash. They're so
noiseless, they won't even wear loud shirts., But
when they (Groan!) run out of Luckies, they
almost lose control. They rant, rave and blow their
stacks-all in sign language, of course! Result?
The unusual phenomenon called a Quiet Riot!
Lucky's popularity, after all, is no fluke. A Lucky
is the best-tasting cigarette you can buy-and for
good reason. It's made of naturally lighIt, good-
tasting tobacco, toasted to taste even better. So
why flounder around? Get Luckies yourself!

GENE NATALIE
KELLY-WOOD
A"*SO AAftRN

General Telephone serves, for exam-
ple, more telephone customers than
the total number of telephones in

WHAT'S A POORLY LIGHTED
BASKETBALL COURT?

WHAT IS A WANDERING ESKIMO?

iM

I

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