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April 25, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE~

x

ATE STUDY:
nhel President To Spend Year in Denmark
:.:By BEATA JORGENSON
From 1531 Student Activities Building to study in Denmark is the
route Marilyn Houck, '58Ph, past president of Panhellenic Association,
will have followed during her senior year.
Everywhere the sparkling blue-green eyed Marilyn has gone, she
f; has made new friends and exercised capable leadership.
.As president of her pledge class for Alpha Xi Delta, Marilyn be-
came interested in the government and purposes of Panhel,
Studies Spring Rush

.awma- n MaGersen
E'N HOUCK-Takes time out to relax after giving up her
duties as president of Panheilenic Association.
[ZZA at the Del Rio
ou have tried the rest - try the BEST.
Reasonable Price on Delivery Service
From 6 P.M. to 12 P.M.
DEER and WINE to take out
12 West Washington
Hours 4 to 12 P.M. - Closed Tuesday
hi le They Last!
SH EAFFER'Sy
Student Handwriting Kit
* GENUINE SHEAFFER'S SKRIPSERT
FOUNTAIN PEN!
" HANDWRITING BOOKLET
to help you write better . . . easiert
" FIVE-PACK famous SKR1P CARTRIDGE
so you can carry your ink supply in your,
purse or pocket!

- Marilyn gained more experience in Panhel problems and opera-
tions when she served as chairman of the research committee set up
to study the implications of spring rush two years ago.
With this experience she stepped into the office of president of
all affiliated women on campus.
"We haven't had occasion to deal with problems as such this year,"
the blond coed remarked, "but we have been strengthened internally
and externally with the administration, national panhel and alums."
"Everything was a pet project," she said smiling, "including the
new secretarial committee, tryout program, the Affiliate, the sorority
newsletter and the establishment of a community service project work-
ing with the Junior Chamber of Commerce selling fruit cakes for
equipment for the Ann Arbor Parks and Recreation."
Likes, Working with.People
Leaning back in her chair she reflected over the past year. "I
enjoyed most working with all people-students, faculty, administra-
tion and especially Dean Elizabeth Leslie, assistant dean of Women
and Panhel Advisor."
One of her sorority sisters remarked, "I never saw Marilyn with-
out a smile and a bottle of homemade aspirin."
Although she had meetings every night and rarely went to bed
before 4 a.m., she never missed an 8 o'clock.
The third generation of Houcks to attend the University's phar-
macy school, the tall coed considers pharmacy, "a wonderful field for
women. In the past ten years it has advanced from a trade to a
Profession."
To Appear on Television
Marilyn, who.1s just at home in the white pharmacy jacket as in
a chemise, is "really excited about appearing on television in Detroit
soon to tell of pharmacy as a career."
"Oh, golly," she laughed, "this has been a thrilling year."
"In June I'm taking my state boards in pharmacy," the coed from
Perrysburg, Ohio remarked, "And on July 29 I'm leaving for a year
of study in Denmark in the program of the Scandanivan Seminar for
Cultural Studies.",
Three months in Copenhagen living with two separate families
and 22 weeks in a folk school studying art or literature will give
Marilyn a, -broad education before she enters pharmacy on her return
from Europe.
Hopes to See World Fair
"I hope to get to the World Fair, too," Marilyn optimistically said.
A knitter in her days before getting busy in campus government,
Marilyn is now working on a ski sweater which will see use in Denmark.
Last weekend Marilyn was busy cleaning up the Panhel office and-
getting the files in order. One of her fellow board members said,
"Marilyn had the direct, logical approach of the scientist in all her
work."
Big Ten Union's Conference
To Meet Here This Weekend

GLASSBLOWER IN ACTION--Dave Myers joins a tube onto a flask for a piece of chemical apparatus. "I've been working for the Un
versity five years," the tall glassblower said, "but I've been a, glassblower the biggest part of myife." He worked for a chemical compan
15 years, Myers said, and was in business for himself four years. Some of the glassware made in the shop, such as micro-analytic disti
ing apparatus, would take three days to complete if he did nothing else, according to Myers.
S hopTurns OutSputnik as ra

Specialty glassware ranging from
helium atmosphere traps for "all
these sputniks that-are going up"
to containers used in the Univer-
sity Hospital's bone bank come out
of the chemistry department glass
shop, according to Dave Myers, the
glassblower.
"We do nothing but specialised
work," Myers explained, "no bot-
tles or beakers.
"Glass is one of the cheapest
things the University buys," he
continued, "but some of the com-
plex apparatus we make costs
three or four hundred dollars and
would take three days to make if
we worked without interruption."
.He mentioned rocket fuel testing
equipment as one of the most ex-
pensive types of glassware turned
out by his shop.
The glass shop does work for the
hospital; for the chemistry depart-
ment and for the engineering
school, according to Myers. The
physics department employs its
own glassblower.
Some of the simpler work such
as tube-bending is delegated to his
assistants, but Myers said he does
most of the work himself. In their
spare time the assistants make
ashtrays and other knickknacks.
Recently for example, one of the
assistants made an ashtray with
spiral legs. It was ornamented
with a stag, a doe and two ducks
made by Myers in his spare time.
He regards such work as fairly
easy.
"The hardest thing I ever did
was re - evacuating a television
tube," glassblower Myers said. "I'll
never try that again.

The Union and the League will
host the Big Ten Union conference
here today, tomorrow, and Sun-
day.
All Big-Ten unions with the ex-
ception of Purdue and North-
western, have sent three repre-
sentatives. The University is the
only school in the conference with
a separate Union and a League.

A $3.44 Value
PEN ...... 2.95
Five'
Cartridges .. .49
3.44

NOW
ONLY

75c

I,

Weddings
Engagements

BUY NOW AND SAY AT

Delegates will view the Michi-
gras parade today. They will dine
in the Union. Dean of Men Walter
B. Rea will address the delegates
as the keynote speaker.
Numerous discussion sessions are
on the agenda for tonight, tomor-
row, and Sunday. Leadership will
'be studied tomorrow, when case
studies, will be presented as ex-
amples. A bus tour of campus will
culminate the activities. FolloW-
ing Sunday dinner, delegates will
return to their respective schools.
Primary aim of Union projects
will receive consideration during
discussion periods, with the stu-
dent versus revenue as a main
topic. The Union's responsibility
to the academic aspects of college
life will also be discussed.
Prof. Allen Menlo of the School
of Education will direct a leader-
ship workshop for Union heads.
Union representatives will out-
line their projects and answer
questions concerning administra-
tion. Projects which have come' to
the University via this discussion
method include the calendar note-
book.

TWISTS AND TURNS-Dave Myers and his glass shop crew turn out heart chambers for turtles,
mercury arc light sources, helium traps for sampling the upper atmosphere, containers used in bone
banks and constant temperature chambers such as this one used for measuring gas pressure. When
working, Myers wears didinium glasses to cut the sodium yellow out of the flame.

STATE ST. at N. UNIVERSITY
-Bow
-
RUFFLES
TUCKS
We've a won-
derful selection,
Cottons-from
2.95. Nylons
Dacrons from
5.95.
MACSHORE CLASSICS
Chalk up another winner for MACSHORE ... it's the
blouson-gone-sissy with streamers of lace, panels of tucks.
Purposely done in DRIP-DRY cotton broadcloth to save

Toth-Livingston
Announcement of the engage-
ment of their daughter,hCarol Mae,
to Joel R. Livingston, Jr., was
made recently by Mr. and Mrs.
StephanToth of Evart.
Livingston is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joel R. Livingston, Sr. of
New York City.
Miss Toth is a sophomore in the
School of Architecture and Design.
Mr. Livingston, a graduate of
the University of Notre Dame, is
a graduate student in chemistry
at the University.
The couple plan to be married
in June.
"DISTINCTIVE"
HAIR STYLING
For those who care -
You're Always Welcome!
11 BARBERS
NO WAITING
SOOTHINGATMOSPHERE
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

DAILY PHOTO FEATURE
Story by THOMAS TURNER
Photos by ERIC ARNOLD

orientation

Petitions for women orientation
leaders will be extended through
Monday.
Applicants may pick up applica-
tion cards in the League Under-
graduate Office. These should be
handed in along with a paper
describing qualf cation, past ex-
perience and-crit cisms of or ideas
for the orientation program.
Leaders for foreign student
groups as well as freshmen and
transfer groups will be chosen.
Applicants may sign for inter-
views in the Undergraduate Office.

THE GLAMOUR OF HOLLYWOOD ...THE EXCITEMENT OF SAN
FRANCISCO...THE WHITE BEACHES OF SANTA BARBARA...
THE SERENITY OF THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY
For Summer Session education in California, you have a uniqtie
choice of four campuses where you can participate in graduate
and undergraduate courses, education workshops and seminars
conducted by a distinguished faculty. r . x
y IVEI SITY OP. I!IC A. /
Berkeley / Los Angeles::he.nfa Ia'N:arayEavs
write for free cata oI ed csmptet information t;
Director, Statewide Summer S i(6%U Umvers . for
LDs.Angeles24tMprti;
.x W

CHECK FOR FLAWS-Once a piece of glassware has been blown,
it must be examined for strains by helding it between the polar-
ized light source and filter. Strains show up as white. The final
step is annealing.

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