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April 19, 1958 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-04-19

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is, 1958

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE?

19, 1958 TUE MIEUI&AN DAILY PAGE~

"

Itlichiganb
Koch, Finkheiner, Liakonis
Pitch in Wolverine Shutout

rurlers

whitewash

Wayne

Sate,

9-

,.,

1'

>_

Cindermen Face Stiff Test

In Ohio State Relays Today

-1

By CARL RISEMAN
Michigan's baseball team rolled
to its third straight victory of the
season yesterday as the Wolver-
ines shut out the Tartars of
Wayne State University, 9-0.
A sparse crowd at Ferry Field
saw three Michigan hurlers, Dean
iinkbeiner, Al Koch and Nick
Liakonis allow only five hits in
the rout. Koch pitched the fifth
and sixth frames and got credit
for the victory.
Close at First
Despite the lopsided score, the
game was actually a tight pitchers'
battle for the first five and one-
third innings.
Jim Mackey, who started and
was credited with the loss for
Wayne State; allowed Michigan
two runs in the first inning and
then settled down and pitched
scoreless ball until the sixth inn-
Ing.
Ernie Myers started the first
inning for Michigan by drawing
a walk. Bob Kucher lay down a
Mackey picked up and threw into
sacrifice bunt which Wayne's
centerfield- as he attempted to
force Myers at second.

Statistics
MICHIGAN AB
Myers, ss 3
Kuther, 2b 4
Sealby, rf 3
Herrnstein, @1of2
McDonald, cf 0
Diekey, lb 3
Drown, 3b £4
Struszewski, 3b 0
Hutchings, it 2
Snider, c 3
Finkbeiner, p 0
a MacPhee 1
Koch, p 0
U Conybeare 1
Liakonis 1
TOTALS 27
a Struck out for Finkbeiner in
b Coniybearopopped to second
man h in 6th
b Pinch-hit for' Koch in th

With baserunners on first and
second, Bob Sealby planted an-
other sacrifice bunt which pitcher
Mackey picked up and attempted
to force Myers at third base. The
throw was too late, the bases were
loaded and clean-up man John
Herrnstein came to the plate.
Hernstein lofted a long sacri-
fice fly to deep center field and
Myers crossed the plate with the
first Michigan run. The next bat-
ter, first baseman Jim Dickey,
smashed Mackey's next pitch into.
right centerfield for a double and
Kucher crossed the plate with the
next run of the inning..
The Wolverines got only two
more hits until the sixth inning
when they scored four rins on
only two hits. Ralph Hutchings
drew a base on balls and quickly
moved to third when Mackey
threw catcher Gene Snider's bunt-
ed ball into right field. Snider
took second.
Michigan's attack temporarily
stalled as pinchhitter Bruce Cony-
beare popped up for the first out.
Hutchings scored frofth third as
Mackey threw a wild pitch past
batter Myers. Mackey continued
to show wildness as he nicked
Myers' helmet on the next pitch
and Myers trotted down to first.
RBI's For Kucher
Myers stole second and both
Snider and he scored as Bob
Kucher lashed a single into cen-
ter field. This brought in a new
pitcher, Bob Wright, who tem-
porarily alleviated the situation
by forcing Bob Sealby to line out
to center field. But Wright got
himself into trouble by walking
Herrnstein.
Norris Quits
As IBC Head
NEW YORK (WP)-James D. Nor-
ris, president of Madison Square
Garden Corp. and International
Boxing Club of New York, Inc.
resigned yesterday as president of
the IBC.
At a meeting of the board of
directors of the IBC of New York,
Truman K. Gibson, Jr., was elect-
ed president.
Norris; however, held on to his
position as president of the Inter-
national Boxing Club of Illinois.
Gibson is a vic.e-president of the
Illinois IBC and will hold that of-
fice in addition to his New York
post.

By BILL ZOLLA
With hopes high, Michigan
track coach Don Canham led his
squad of 31 varsity cindermen and
ten top freshmen to Columbus for
the annual Ohio Relays being held
today.
There will be six different re-
lays with six more open events,
all to be decided this afternoon.
Fresh from their fine perform-
ance in the Quantico Relays, the
Wolverines go into these relays
against some of the stiffest com-
petition in the nation, attempt-
ing a repeat performance.
Still Favored
Even in the face of this oppo-
sition, Canham stated, "Our boys
are favored in the sprint medley
relay and should also do well in
the two-mile relay, and the 440-
yd. and 880-yd. relays.
In the isprint medley event at
Quantico, the Michigan team
raced to a new meet record of
3:28.2, with anchor man Earl
Deerdorff turning the 880-yd. In
a fast 1:53.6. The same men who
ran this event at Quantico, Don

Mathesan, Jim

Christie, and Deerdorff, will run
today.
"Our time will have to be even
faster if we want to take the
race," Canham declared. "We
should be able to improve on the
sprint medley relay showing
though, for the weather at Quan-
tico was inclement, and the track
was in poor condition."-
Taking into consideration the
other entries in this event, Can-
ham said, "Ohio State, with the
great Glen Davis, Indiana, and
a surprisingly strong team from
Eastern Michigan College should
prove to be the toughest opposi-
tion.
Although the Ohio' Relays do
not offer any team title, all Mich-
igan entrants will be out to dem-
onstrate their best efforts for two
reasons.
Two Reasons
In addition to the individual
Canham said that his choices for
glory obtained by doing well,
the Penn Relays next week will
be made on the performances at
Columbus.
Many top individual perform-
ers will be drawn to the Ohio out-
door competition. A top-flight
duel may develop between Davis
of Ohio State and young Hayes
Jones of Eastern Michigan.
Davis is the favorite in all the
events in which he is entered, but
he will be challenged by Sopho-
more Jones, acclaimed by many
to be the finest young hurdler in
the country.

Simpson, Joe

-,Daily-Karl Hok
IT WAS FOUL-This is what Miehigan's catcher, Gene Snider, is
telling the umpire. Snider had hit the ball down the third base line
on a hit and run play, but thinking it foul, only jogged to first. The
umpire ruled it fair and also ruled Snider out.

FRED JULIAN
... running hard

U

REPLACEMENT PROBLEM:,
Reserves Guard 'M' Tennis Record

Your best buy is a
PIZZA

giant twelve-inch
S0 0$100

Scrimmage
Scheduled
for Today
Beginning at 2 p.m. today
Ferry Field, Michigan's footl
squad will engage in its fi
scheduled scrimmage of the spr
workouts.
Yesterday, however, Coa
Oosterbaan surprised the can
dates with an "unschedule
scrimmage. The team seemed
take a pleasure in it, though, a
played it to the hilt despite -
80 degree temperature.
Several candidates have alres
shown a definite spirit and dr
in their attempt to make the f
squad, particularly Fred Juli
Julian has been running Ni
in spring training since it beg
three days ago, in an effort
make up ground lost last year
an injury-riddled season.
Today's scrimmage will prov
the opportunity for further E
perimenting with Bob Ptacek
quarterback and Jim Byers
center.

R H
2 0
22
1 0
1 0
0 0
0 3
S0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
9s
4th.
base-

V

WAT"EAB RH1
Thow, if 5 0 1
Snowden, 2b 3 0 2
Cook, 3b 4 0 1
Montecillo, e 2 0 0
Wright, p , 0 0 10
Mackey, P 1 0 0
Pagan, p 0 0 0
Koepke, lb 4 0 0
Jiertenstein, e! 4 0 0
DiPaola, cf-rf 3 0 0
LeQuier, rf 1 0 0
Conrad, ef 2 0 0
b Coicheck 1 0 1
eKeley 1 0 0
Soiuk, c 1 0 0
IUdricea, d 0 0 0
TOTALS 32 0 5
a Singlet for Wright in 8th.
b Strock out for Conrad in 9th.
WAYI '' 000 000 000--0 5 2
MICHIGAN 200 004 12x--9 8 2

By BOB ROMANOFF
"I am not pessimistic, but rather
realistic," tennis coach Bill Mur-
phy said of the chances of Michi-
gan dominating that sport as it
has during the past three seasons.
The Wolerivnes enter the com-
ing campaign, seeking their fourth
consecutive Conference and second
consecutive NCAA championships.
The Wolverines have a tremen-
dous string of 45 straight meet vic-
tories, but are faced with the prob-
lem of finding replacements for
five graduated lettermen.
I These men are Barry MacKay,
America's present top hope to end
Australia's Davis Cup supremacy,
Dick Potter, last year's captain,
Mark Jaffe, Dale Jenson and Dick
Cohen.
Single Champs
The first three were single's
champions in their divisions. \,
Murphy has but three veterans
returning from last year's squad.
They are Jon Erickson, Captain
John Harris and George Korol.
They played in the fourth, fifth
and seventh positions last year. In
addition, Erickson and Harris were
champions of their division.

Another veteran is Bob Sassone
who won his letter four years ago
as a sophomore and then dropped
out of school until this year.
The remainder of the squad is
made up of four sophomores. These
newcomers are Wayne Peacock,
Wisconsin State High Sch ool
Champion, who Murphy says is a
steady performer rather than an
overpowering one.

Hard hitting Bill Vogt and
steady Frank Fulton and John
Wiley make up the remainder of
the squad.
Murphy said that intra-squad
matches will start next week in
seeking the line-up. "As of now,"
Murphy said, "all the players are
about even in their fight for posi-
tions."

If

Major League ,Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York 2 1 .750
Baltimore 2 1 .667
Detroit 2 2 .500
Kansas City 2 2 .500
Cleveland 2 2 .500
Chicago 2 2 .500
Washington 1 2 .333
Boston 1 3 .250
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 11, Kansas City 7
New York 3, Baltimore 1
Cleveland 7, 1Detroit 5
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Kansas City (N)
Cleveland at Detroit
Baltimore at New York
Boston at Washington

GB
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NATIONAL
Chicago
Milwaukee
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
St. Louis

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
3 0 1.000
2 1 .667
2 2 .500
2 2 .500
1 1 .500
1 1 .500
1 2 .333
0 3 .000

GB
1
2
3

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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS'
Los Angeles 6, San. Francisco 5
Chicago 11, St. Louis 6
Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 1
Milwaukee 4, Philadelphia 2
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Los Angeles
St. Louis at Chicago
Milwaukee at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

f

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.:N. . N.:. .
Young .Women0
After 'Graduation, Begin
Y=i Career In An Executive Position £
If youre a College senior, you can prepare now for ay impor M
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tE ADJUTANT GENERA,
Department of the Army

a

prj4. ma 1

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