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April 18, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-04-18

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I'MAY. APRU& 18. 1958

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

a PiflAY APRIL13. 953THE CHGAN AIL

Wolverines ost

Wane

Nine

To day

AT FERRY FIELD:
Michigan Goes. After Eighth Win;
Finkbeiner To Be Starting Pitcher

Pitching, Hitting Highlight
I-M Pro Fraternity Softball

By STEVE ROGERS
ichigan will be aiming for its
eighth victory in ten games of pre-
conference play when they face
Wayne State University at 3:30
p.m. today at Ferry Field.
Dean Finkbeiner will be the
starting hurler for the Wolver-
ines who will be going after their
second home win in as many
games.,
Coach Ray Fisher ishoping that
Wayne will offer sterner opposi-
tion than did Michigan's last two
foes, Western Michigan and the
University of' Detroit. The Wol-
verines played sparkling ball in

beating them 7-2 and 11-2 respec-
tively, but neither of these teams
are of Big Ten caliber.
Challenge for Wayne
This game represents a chal-
lenge for Wayne, because since
the start of the Wayne-Michigan'
series in 1941, the Tartars have
been able to win only one of 13
contests.

Hayslett, Cole
Voted Captams
Of Gym Team
Michigan gymnastics coach
Newt Loken announced yesterday
that the 1958-59 team will be
headed by co-captains.
The team voted the double hon-
ors to Juniors Jim Hayslett and
Ed Cole. Nino Marion, a quickly
improving sophomore star, was
voted this year's most valuable
team member.
Hayslett and Cole replace Ed
Gagnier, the top gym star in
Michigan history, who was .kept
from Big Ten and NCAA competi-
tion by a bad shoulder injury.
Gagnier was voted most valuable
the past two seasons, and would
have undoubtedly repeated this
year if it weren't for his injury.

Wayne promises to be tougher
this year than they have in the
past, however, ap 13 lettermen are
back from the 1957 squad, the best
since 1949.
Leading the Tartar attack are
triple letter winners Fred Snow-
den and Ron Hertenstein. Herten-
stein hit .280 last season to lead
all returning players.
Michigan is counting on a con-
tinuance of its powerful attack to
maintain their domination of
Wayne. The Wolverines, sparked
by Jim Dickey, unleashed 14 hits
in walloping Detroit-last Wednes-
day.
Three for Three
Dickey went three for three and
scored three runs, while Bob
Kucher and Ralph Hutchings
each had two safeties in the De-
troit contest.
At this early stage in the sea-
son, Dave Brown, John Herrn-
stein, Dickey, and Hutchings are
all hitting well over the charmed
.300 mark.
Pleasing Performance
Perhaps the most pleasing per-
formance turned in so far, out-
side of Herrnstein's no-hitter
against Bradley, was sophomore
Ron Jernigan's fine relief effort
in the Western Michigan game.
He held the Bronco's to four hits
while posting his second victory of
the year.
Five pitchers teamed up in the
Detroit rout, limiting the Titans
to two runs on six hits. Jim Brad-
shaw, aided by George Weemhoff,
Bob Sealby, Al Koch, and Denny
Denhouter gained credit for the
win.

By BILL ZOLLA -
Fine pitching, good hitting, and
poor fielding highlighted yester-
day's professional fraternity soft-,
ball activity at Fery Field.
Dick Courtney and Bill Adams
collaborated in spinning a one-
hitter and Tom Vestevich cracked
a three-run homer and a triple as
Delta Sigma Delta trounced Tau
Epsilon Rho 19-8.
Two Homers
Leroy Michaels smashed two
round-trippers and Ron Fraley
hurled the route in Phi Delta Phi's.
New I-M Hours
The I-M Building will be
open during the following
hours, effective Monday, Ap-
ril 21: Monday through Friday,
8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m.-
6 p.m.
12-4 victory over Alpha Chi Sig-
ma.
In a tight pitching duel between
Paul Richman of Alpha Omega
and Jim Watkins of Nu Sigma Nu,
bad fielding again played an im-
portant role in Nu Sig's 4-1 win.
Each team totaled only four hits,
but the victors utilized theirs to
the greatest advantage.
Dwight Galloway of Phi Rho
Sigma hurled his way out of a

tight spot in the top half of the
final inning to squelch a rally and
preserve his team's 6-5 margin
over Phi Alpha Delta.
Law Club Wins, 15-4
In the final encounter, Brad
Glass, Richard Kabaker, and Joe
Georgianass knocked home runs
to pace the Law Club's 15-4 past-
ing of Phi Chi. Jerry Leipply
pitched for the winners and was
never in trouble.
In "B" softball games in the
social fraternity circuit, Zeta Beta
Tau rolled over Phi Kappa Tau
by the top-heavy score of 39-4, in
compiling the biggest score of
the day. In other games, Phi Del-
ta Theta smashed Phi Gamma
Delta 27-14, Sigma Alpha Mu
beat Sigma Phi Epsilon, 12-9, Al-
pha Epsilon Pi defeated Delta Up-
silon, 15-4, and Chi Psi won over
Beta Theta Pi, 9-5. The game be-
tween Delta Tau Delta and Sigma
Chi ended in a 10-10 tie in extra
innings.
Calling All Teams
The I-M Department has an-
nounced a proposed formulation
of a baseball league as part of its
expanding sports program.
Interested teams are advised to
contact Earl Riskey or Jim Clark
at the I-M Building.

I

BOB PTACEK
*.new leader

JIM DICKEY
... slugging catcher

Tracksters Find Foe in Elements

n-.-

By DICK MINTZ
Regardless of weather condi-
tions, the Wolverine track team
can now be found practicing daily
on the cinders of Ferry Field.
Coach Canham's theory is once
the outdoor season has begun the
shelter of the field house should
be deserted until the following in-
door season. Track meets remain
outside rain or shine, so that prac-
tice outdoors serves to prepare the
harriers fr any and all weather
conditions they' might run into
during a regular meet.
The most recent example of this
was at the very opening meet of
the season in Quantico, Va., last
week. The team turned in an im-
pressive performance despite the
fact that the weather there made
Ann Arbor's climate comparable to
Ft. Lauderdale's.
Most Important Factor
Weather conditions, then, are
the most important factor to be
considered in making the transi-
tion from the indoor to the out-
door season.
The- cinder track of the field
house is kept in ideal condition
throughout the indoor season.
Runners know the condition of
their track and expect it to be
kept the same way meet after
meet.
Not so outdoors. The track sur-

face can be muddy and soft or dry
and hard depending on the weath-
er of the day. The runners ability
to adjust to these variable condi-
tions is essential to a winning
performance.
The actual physical construction
of the indoor and outdoor tracks
differ as well. The indoor course
is shorter with naturally more
curves to take during a race. It
usually has a harder surface of
either cinder or boards.
Straightaways Longer Outdoors
The outdoor track has the longer
straightaways and thus favors the
long-legged runner who can't
jockey for position as well as the
small man on the bends of the
indoor track. There is also a
greater tendency for its surface to
cushion the steps of the runner.
Events, too, are lengthened out-
doors. The 100-yd. dash is sub-
stituted for the indoor 60 and the
120-yd. low hurdles replace the
65. The discus throw is also added
to the field events.
Psychological Effects
Leaving the stuffy, cramped con-
fines of the field house also has its
psychological effects on the run-
ner. The crowd is pushed further
from the field and the coach also
loses the intimacy he had with his
team in the restricted area of the
field house.

The runner also faces a wind
barrier or aid, depending on its
direction, which he doesn't have
to contend with indoors. Then too,
because of the greater straight-
away ground covered, the running
time outside is usually faster.
LA To .Draw
90,000 .Fans
LOS ANGELES (A) - Anything
San Francisco can do Los Angeles
figures it can do better, so more
than 90,000 fans - an all-time
record - are expected to cram
into the Coliseum today for the
home baseball debut of the trans-
planted Dodgers.
Thus, with second openers, the
so-called national pastime goes
truly national, played on a big
league scale from the Atlantic
Ocean to the Pacific.
More Famous for Football
The anticipated turnout in Los
Angeles' mammoth arena, more
famous for football and track
events, probably will boost the
second round attendance figures
beyond the 259,108 of last Tues-
day's full-scale debut.
At any rate, the swelling base-
ball crowds in all areas strike a
blow at recession talk and indi-
cate the slump has not noticeably
affected the sports dollar.
The largest baseball crowd on
record is the 86,288 which saw the
fifth game of the Cleveland-Bos-
ton World Series in 1948. The Na-
tional League record is 60,747, on
hand for a New York Giants-
Brooklyn Dodger doubleheader at
the Polo Grounds May 31, 1937.

Coach Gives
'M' Gridders,
By JIM BENAGH
There's an old unwritten axiom
among Big Ten football players
that fighting gridders who love
contact get the greatest respect
from their teammates.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan gave
his squad drills in an effort to
find this type of men yesterday as
the team Went through heavy
body workouts under the contin-
uing hot Ann Arbor sun.
Ptacek Shines
Backs got a rugged test in
fighting off blockers in "bull in
the ring" under driving Backfield
Coach Bump Elliott. Bob Ptacek,
the Wolverine quarterback-half-
back, shined, and showed possi-
bilities of being a fine leader for
the young backs.
Five Passers
Passing drills got a nod from
the coaches' for the first time,
with Stan Noskin, Ptacek, John
Spidel, Jim Sytek and Don Han-
nah throwing from the quarter-
back position.
Hannah, a Gary, Ind., young-
ster, is the only freshman hurler
in the group.
Plays were run for the first time
by the team as a whole, as Oos-
terbaan prepared for the initial
scrimmage scheduled for tomor-
row.
New Assistants
Mike Shatuskey and Jim Da-
vies, regulars from last season's
eleven, were added to the coach-
ing staff as student assistants.
Shatusky is a physical education
major who plans to go into coach-
ing.
Visitors at practice included
Ron Kramer, Michigan's former
All-America end.
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
Montreal leads in best-of-seven series,
3-2.
Montreal 3, Boston 2 (overtime)

Quickie C/ickie
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PIZZA

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Alegend ofXochipili
An Original Dance-Drama
Presented by
Department of Physical Education for Women
with Overture by
A percussion instrument ensemble
from the School of Music
HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE
SYMPOSIUM ON MEXICAN ART AND CULTURAL HISTORY

Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
Saturday Evening
April 19, 1958
8:00 P.M.

TICKETS ON SALE
AT BOX OFFICE
FRI. 2:00-5:30
SAT. 10:00-8:15

L

JI

-- _

Major Lea
AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct.
Baltimore 2 0 1.000
Detroit 2 1 .667
Kansas City 2 1 .667
New York 2 1 .667
Washington 1 2 .333
Cleveland 1 2 .333
Chicago 1 2 .333
Roston 1 3 .250
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 3, Kansas City 2
Chicago 4, Detroit 3
New York 3, Boston 1
Baltimore 4, Washington 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Detroit
Baltimore at New York
Chicago at Kansas City
Only games sceduled.

rgue Standings1

GB
l1z
2

NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct. GB
Chicago 2 0 1.000 -
Philadelphia 1 0 1.000 Y2
San Francisco 2 1 .667 Y2
Milwaukee 1 1 .500 1
Pittsburgh 1 1 .500 1
Cincinnati 0 1 .000 .1%
St. Louis 0 2 .000 2
Los Angeles 0 2 .000 2
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 7, Los Angeles 4
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago 4, St. Louis 3
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Los Angeles
St. Louis at Chicago
Milwaukee at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

r,

In Honor of the Tenth Anniversary of
- - 2 - - -- - -- - .flI . .. v. -
A Cordial Invitation Is Extended
To All Students and FaCulty
H EAR:
Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall1
of the Detroit News

You have tried the Rest - Now

try

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TONIGHT, April 18th, 9:00 P.M.
Following Sabbath Services, at 8 P.M.

1429 Hill St.

ATTEND: Reception at Lane Hall,
S. State and Washington Sts.
Saturday, April 19, 3:30 P.M.
PROGRAM: Greetings of President Harlan Hatcher.
ISRAEL IN SONG AND PLAY, featured by the Galil
Group, Israeli Student Artists.
Sponsored by the U.S. National Student Association.

-

The Prices Do Not Include Sales Tax

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