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March 30, 1958 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-30
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T H E

JA! LY MAGA

30, 1958

Sunday, March

33yTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

ZINE '

Bi er

Than

a

Riot

N

Atomic Radiation Resear

SGC Hopefuls Consult Poli Si Majors,

10 30 ARDEE

-

A THE LEAVES fade from the
trees and again as they reap-
pear, a curious rite occurs on the
University of Michigan campus.
Some believe it to be a sacrifice to
the great and powerful god,
THINK, deity of bureaucracy.
Some consider it an athletic con-
test resembling the Apache endur-
ance trials. The more realistic, or
less imaginative, among us simply
sigh or groan or exclaim, "SGC

elections are this week aren't
they?"
Bigger than a riot, but smaller
than a revolution is the impact of
Student Government Council elec-
tions on the campus. The impact
on the candidate more closely re-
sembles that of the wrecking
crews on the Romance Language
Building.
While the "powers that be" sit
quietly in their rooms discussing
the relative merits of sin, the can-
didates scurry from "organized"
housing units to disorganized din-

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ners consisting of candy bars and
black coffee to more housing
groups to hurried conferences with
election experts who are usually
roommates, fiancees, and Poli Sci
majors.
Between speeches, the bleary-
eyed individuals plan strategy-
usually humbug, eat nourishing
food-usually hamburgers, and
keep smiling-usually half-heart-
edly.
BEFORE the first three days of
campaigning have passed, the
candidates realize that running
for alderman from a district of
24,000 is not the work of a mo-
ment, or a few hundred moments.
As an SGC candidate, the former
student faces some problems that
no other candidates in any other
elections have to face, a fortun-
ate thing for the preservation of
the state and prevention of an-
archy.
First, the term "run" for office
is hardly applicable to an SGC
election.
Everywhere in the United States,
a candidate runs for office; in
Britain, he stands for election; but
at the Athens of the Midwest, he
bicycles for office. After a day on
a bicycle, the candidate begins to
feel the British have the right
idea.
Mastery of the villainous bike,
while it is not usually used as cri-
teria for voter support, is an
achievement in which a candidate
can well take pride.
It would be worth a Master's
Degree to find out how the candi-
Jo Hardee, a junior in the
literary college, knows where-
of she speaks. Miss Hardee
has been a candidate for Stu-
dent Government Council
twice and has served on sev-
eral of that group's commit-'
tees.

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),

$y JOHN AXE
Daily Staff Writer
MONG the University's many
colleges and departments, few
are less publicized in relation to
their importance than the Medicat
School's.Department of Human
Genetics.
Nestled next to the building
housing the Social Research In-
stitute on Catherine. St., the
genetics department's offices are
hidden to all but the most prying
eye.
Despite the lack of fanfare, im-
portant research projects, ranging
from distribution of blood types
throughout the world to the effects
of ionizing atomic radiation upon
future generations are carried on.
According to Prof. James V.
Neel; chairman of the Department
of Human Genetics, the depart.
ment lias- just completed a typical
project, notably, a ten-year study
of the delayed effects of ionizing
radiation on the children of the
survivors of the Hiroshima and
Nagasaki bombings.
This particular study, Prof. Neel
explains, was set up to answer the
very pressing question of the sensi-

study by physicians over a fen-
year period on over 65,000 infants,
were "any clear and certain dif-
ferences between chiriren of ir-
radiated parents and those whose
parents had, not been exposed to,
radiation were not detected," ac-
cording to Prof. Neel.
"The only possible exception
was .a change in the 'sex patio,.
with fewer, daughters being born
to exposed fathers and fewer sons
to exposed mothers."
ALTOUGi ithe study thus
yielded relatively little in the
way of positive finding, it did,
according to Prof. Neel, serve the
important function of quieting ill-
founded rumors concerning the
genetic effects of the atomic
bombs.
Immediately after the war, there
were a number of wild and ex-
aggerated stories dealing with the
possible effects of the bombs In
the next generation, many of these
reports can now be discounted.
GENETICISTS now believe there
may be no actual threshold of
exposure below which radiation

Vitality

Si

famous for

Fashion

after year may ultimately produce
as may defective descendants as a
much larger dose given all at the
same time.
THE UNIVERSITY researcher
indicated a greatly expanded

dates solve an interesting space-
time relationship problem which
a sprawling campus and fifty .to
sixty speaking engagements pre-
sent.
WHEN A FUTURE "leader of
men" discovers that he is to
speak at seven fraternities, at '1
p.m., all of which are more than
seven~ blocks apart, he begins to
feel that seven is not his lucky
number.
Then, there is the problem of
the uninitiated into the Greek
letter system. One candidate re-
versed two names and made a sur-
prise visit to a fraternity on Hill
Street while a disappointed femin-
ine audience went to dinner with-
out the benefit of his inspiring
words.
Far worse than the problem of
arriving at a house while there
is still someone around to listen,
let alone to pay attention, is the
question of what to say.
Many is the golden-voiced ora-
tor who smilingly chews off his
foot and is working on his knee-
cap when he realizes that the
group is grimacing instead of
smiling back at him. No cases
have been reported lately of can-
didates who thought they were
at one house and .suited their
viewpoints to that group, only to
discover that their geography and
their politics were equally poor..
But, it is safe to say, that ev-

program .of research as- well as
much patient research is necessary
before the dilemma is solved.
This, the Department of Humar
Genetics takes in stride. The
realize research must be carried
on without fanfare, and often

ery amateur politician has shud.
dered at the thought of both sit-
uations. The more professional
politicos have learned either stick
to the same viewpoint, or learn
better geography.
FEMININE candidateshave, on-
ly occasionally, the interesting
quandry of h aving nothing to say.
This is especially prevalent towaard
$ ... .
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BLOOD TYPING-H. Henry Gershowitz and Ellen Waigren read
blood types in a laboratory in the Dep-artment of Human Genetics.

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tivity of human genes to the mu-
tagenic effects of irradiation and
the relation of radiation induced
mutations to spontaneous muta-
tions.
THE STUDY was to be conducted
by examining at birth each
child born to Japanese parents
who had been exposed to radiq-
tion in the atomic bombings.
Prof. Neel explained examiners
sought to find out if the children's
sex or birth weight were greatly
changed. Information was also
sought on infant mortality at birth
and occurrence of gross malforma-
tion.
The infants were placed in dif-
ferent classifications according to'
degree of radiation to which their
parents had been exposed. They
then were compared with new
born babies of unexposed parents
as te physical characteristics at
birth.
T|HE| RESULTS of the project,
determined after a careful

doesn't produce" mutation. "In
other words," Prof. Neel explained,
"any amount of radiation produces
some mutation-the greater the
amount, the more mutations re-
sult."
If this theory is true, and there
are many things in its favor, then
any amount of radiation will re-
sult in some genetic changes.
This fact, coupled with the
knowledge that radiation damage
is directly proportional to the
amount of radiation received and
the belief that the genetic effect
of radiation accumulates from
generation to generation, has led
to the premise that a little radia-
tion damage to a large number
of people can be as harmful to
future generations as a great deal
of exposure to a few.
"This is so,'" Prof. Neel ex-
plained, "because when a harmful
mutation occurs it stays in the
line of inheritance until the entire
line dies out."
As a result, a small dose of
radiation which is repeated year

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