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March 30, 1958 - Image 9

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Page Eighteen

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

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Sunday, March 30, 1958

3 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Modernity andAntiquity:

MAGAZINE

THE

SOUT

Vol. IV, No. 6

Sunday, March

30, 1958

"Epitaph for Dixie" Echoes the L

CONTENTS

Uy ROSE PERLBERG
Daily Activities Editor
IN THE growing family of Middle
Eastern Nations, there is a pre-
cocious 10-year-old child with the
dreams and aspirations of one far
older, and the determination and
perseverance to fulfill them. Its
name is Pakistan.
Eighty per cent of Pakistan's 82
million people work the soil; 80
per cent of these, with the same
crude implements that their
grandfather's- grandfathers used.
But there are some of the younger
generation, the men and women
who were children and adolescents
Then Pakistan came into her own
10 years ago, who are convinced
that their country can rise to con-
quer its illiterary problems, can
eventually take its place high
among the well-developed coun-
tries of the world.
Sitting with me in the Union
lounge are two such reformers.
Soft-spoken, slightly-built Mo-

hammed Hussain slouches in an
overstuffed chair. His casual posi-
tion and rumpled sports clothes
indicate a relaxed young man. But
Mohammed's dark, alert eyes are
constantly shifting; his lean, sup-
ple fingers nervously tap his
leather-cased slide rule. Even after
months of previous acquaintance,
Mohammed is never completely at
ease with me. There is always a
marked reticence, a shyness that
seems to place a thin, but un-
penetrable veil between Moham-
med and myself. Even after almost
four years at an American Uni-
versity, he is still on edge when
he's alone with American women.
Viqar (pronounced VTeechahr)
Quadri provides a good counter-
part to Mohammed's mild, tem-
perate personality. As he is quiet
and withdrawn, she is vivacious
and outgoing. What you first note
about Viqar is her wide, radiant
smile. It lights up her face, dim-
ples her full cheeks and puts an

extra sparkle into her warm brown
eyes. When Viqar talks she speaks
with her hands, her expressive
face, her whole energetic body.
Whether it's a vigorous toss of her
long, shiny black braided hair, or
a gentle graceful hand motion,
Viqar seems endowed with a cer-
tain dynamism that is contagious.
DESPITE the advances Paki-
stanis have made towards mod-
ernizing their country in the past
10 years; a good 65 per cent of its
population still lives in extreme
poverty, Viqar says. Main cities
like Viqar's home in West Paki-
stan, its capital, Karachi, and
Dacca, in East Pakistan, home
base for Mohammed, are compar-
able to big Western cities, says
Mohammed. Standing side by side
with century-old mosques, are
modern homes and business build-
ings. Passing each other on sun-
baked streets are horse-drawn
carts and modern European cars.
All over are evidences of what
Mohammed terms with a broad
grin, "your push-button civiliza-
tion."
But a few miles out of the cities,
mud huts dot the banks of the
Indus and Ganges Rivers and
their back-country tributaries.
Here in the villages, the life of
the farmer is the same as it's been
for hundreds of years--with the
few exceptions of American dollar-
purchased mechanization. Here
lie the roots of Pakistan's greatest
problems: poverty and ignorance.
When she speaks of these vil-
lagers, Viqar's cheerful face sud-
denly darkens; her lips drawn
back into a pleasant, white-toothed
smile, press tightly into a deter-
mined straight line. "In the next
two decades," she says softly, but
with intense conviction, "illiteracy
will be completely liquidated. The
tractors and your modern tools
will replace everywhere the wood-
en plowing stick and the oxen."

THE SOUTH James Young
FRENCH POETRY Vernon Nahrgang
SGC CAMPAIGNING Jo Hardee,
COEDS IN RUSSIA David Kessel
THE RECESSION _Susan Holtzer
THE SUNSHINE STATE Donna Hanson
LOCAL ARTISTS' WORKS - Joan Kaatz--
UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY
JACK KEROUAC Keith DeVries and
Donald A. Yates
TRAVEL GUIDES Donald A. Yates
SENATOR KENNEDY Thomas Turner
THE PIZZAIUOLO Barton Huthwaite
RADIATION RESEARCH John Axe
PAKISTAN Rose Perlberg

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PUSH-BUTTON CIVILIZATION-Viqar Quadri and Mohammed
Hussain admire evidence of the American mechanization which
they hope will soon mark Pakistan's economy.

I9

TODAY, the average farmer lives
in a mud bungalow, usually of
one or two rooms, with a court-
yard and tree, under the shadow
of which women do most of their
work. For it gets unbearably hot
in Pakistan's lowland country..
Vigar comments with a shrug
that 116 degree temperatures with
high humidity are not uncommon
for months at a time everywhere
in Pakistan except for northern
mountain area. The main street,
a dirt road, pounded smooth by
the bare feet of the people and
the hoofs of their work animals
is flanked by mud walls on one
side and open to the fields on the
other. Huts are grouped together
to make this common wall a safety
measure against bands of robbers
that prowl the countryside and
against the biggest terror of them
all, the river floods.
"Are floods common?" I inter-
rupt Viqar's descriptive narrative.
"Oh yes." She answers soberly.
"The people sitting in their huts

at night feel it throb -and when
the throb becomes a roar, they
know it is time to flee."
EVERY.YEAR, the mighty Indus
churns over its banks and gush.
es over the land. A twisting, rip-
pling blanket of brown-yellow
water, it surges through fields,
demolishes homes and belongings
in a swirl of mud and foam, then
slowly retreats, a greedy, well-fed,
monster, satisfied and sluggish,
placated for another year.
In these times of crisis. Viqar
says, the government helps with
evacuation, but peasants must
build their homes'again and often
lose many of their meagre belong.
ings.
"Why," I ask, "hasn't the gov-
ernment been able to build dams
to hold back the floods?"
Viqar smiles sadly, almost apolo-
getically. "Oh, there are dams,
but they are of mud and they are
always cracking and such. And

MAGAZINE EDITOR: CAROL PRINS
PICTURE CREDITS-Cover: Bruce Bailey; Page 4: Sketches by
Gen Leland; Page 6: Photos by Izora Corpman and Patricia Doss;
Page 8: Political Cartoon by Robert Snyder; Page 9: Photographs
by Fred Shippey; Page 10: Daily photos by Dave Arnold; Page 11:
Daily photos by Bruce Bailey; Page 12: Photo courtesy of The
Grove Press; Page 14: Cartoon courtesy of The Ronald Press Co.;
Page 17: Daily photo by Harold Gassenheimer; Page 18: Daily
photo by Robert Kanner..
ANTHOLOGY:
FRENCH POETRY

EPITAPH FOR DIXIE. By Har-
ry Ashmore. W. W. Norton.
New York. 189 pp. $3.50.
By JAMES YOUNG
EPITAPH FOR DIXIE is a pene-
trating analysis of the prob-
lems that gave rise to last Septem-
ber's integration- difficulties in
Little Rock, and a prognosis of the
future of the South.
Harry Ashmore is a n a t i v e
Southerner, born in South Caro-
lina. Liberal in politics, he has
been a personal assistant to Adlai
E. Stevenson and is a director of
the Fund for the Republic.
It is the dominence of the radi-
cal racial element that is a prom-
inent theme of Epitaph For Dixie.
A majority of white Southerners,
while certainly not in favor of
integration, at least perceive the
desperate need to escape from the
impasse in which the region finds
itself. But this majority cannot
function without guidance. "It re-
mains impotent-because it remains
for the most part, without public
or private leadership." This failure
leaves a gap which the White Citi-.
zens Councils and the Ku Klux
Klan are more than happy to fill.
THE SOUTHERN Manifesto ex-
pressing the support of an
overwhelming majority of the
South's congressional delegation
for a last ditch resistance move-
ment against integration is a
monument to this default. In an
example of political ineptitude
seldom surpassed in recent years,
the signatories not only under-
mined their own party, but also
severely damaged the chances of
their choice for the Democratic
presidential. nomination, Adlai E.
Stevenson.
One might expect southern in-
tellectuals to provide the guidance
so badly needed, but here as with
the political leadership, the situa-
tion is not at all bright. The
South has now developed an edu-
cational system which permits at
least a minimum exposure to the
fruits of learning for all. Its uni-
versities are very good if not ab-
solutely top flight. On the other
hand, Ashmore still maintains the
region is basically hostile to the

intellectual process. For a century
and a quarter the racial problem
had a stultifying effect on free
inquiry throughout the region;
when- the anti-slavery intellec-
tuals were driven from the area
and the Mason-Dixon line be-
came a barricade against the free
flow of ideas, integration became
an off limits topic for southern
thinkers.
WHEN the Dean of the School
of Education at the Univer-
sity of South Carolina talked in
terms of a program of gradual in-
tegration he was summarily forced
from his job. Six University of
Alabama professors resigned their
jobs as a protest against the
handling of the Autherine Lucy
incident. However,Afewuniversity
people are willing to take such
drastic action.
Rather, they tend to choose a
less controversial path, keep si-
lent, and let it be known in pro-
fessional circles that they are
open to offers from northern
schools.
Othef opinion leaders are doing
no better. Few newspaper editors
have either the inclination or the
courage to speak out clearly on

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AN ANTHOLOGY OF FRENCH
POETRY FROM NERVAL TO
VALERY IN ENGLISH
TRANSLATION. Edited' by
Angel Flores. 456 pp. Garden
City: Doubleday Anchor
Books. $1.45.
By VERNON NAHRGANG
Daily City Editor
JN PUTTING together a very
competent anthology of French
poetry of the nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries, editor Angel
Flores has wisely made a collec-
tion -of translations by a large
number of English and American
poets rather than attempting to
write new English versions of the
French verse.-
As the title indicates, this an-
thology has been prepared for the
English reader; its selections are
careful translations that stand as
poetry themselves, verse that is
meaningful and expressive to the
reader who knows little or no
French.
The English reader should fur-
thermore be concerned with this
period in the history of French
literature.
HE SELECTIONS are important
ones. Nerval, Baudelaire, Cor-
biere, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mal-
larme, Laforgue, Apollinaire and
Valery are the poets represented,
each with an introductory bio-
graphical note and a substantial
bibliographical listing.
Included with the English ver-
sions of the chief works of these
poets are the French texts, ar-
ranged at the back of the book for
ready comparison --and suggesting
at the soe time that the com-
parison be made.

Indeed, this anthology further
suggests a comparative study of
French and English poetry with
emphasis on translation -- as
handled by a variety of transla-
tors; Angel Flores' book would
make a fine text for such a study.
In many ways, the greater under-
standing of a foreign literature
comes with an examination of the
differences in emphasis and ap-
proach in the two literatures.
And this selection of writings,
with a number of attractive prose
translations often more telling
than the poetry, makes a con-
venient manual for the under-
standing and appreciation of
French poetry of recent years.

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