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March 27, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-27

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THE MICMIGAN DAILY

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rate of "between 8 and 10 hours ToContinue
per week." Under the report of the
discussion section, readers were
told they were "sure of getting a Prof. Clark Hopkins of the
good man." classical archaeology department
Advise Elimination will speak on "Cyprus Hunts the
"Veterans advised the elimina- Cougar" at 4:15 p.m. today in
tion of Elliott, but section leaders Rackham in conjunction with the
make the course a lively and valu- Children's Book Fair.
able experience. Concentrators re- "What Goes into a Historical
ceived their first acquaintance Book" will be the subject of How-
with basic problems of the modern ard Peckham, director of the
state, comparative government and Clements Library, who will speak
theory through the centuries. It is at 7 p.m. He will be followed by a
well worth the effort." discussion of storytelling by Gus
Gregg said that his committee Leinbach, a junior high school
is now trying to determine the teacher.
best way to select material 'for Ellen Wilt, director of the chil-
the booklet. They are considering dren's creative arts program of the
the poll method, as Harvard uses, Ann Arbor public schools, spoke
and the committee method. With yesterday on "Scenery Design and
a committee, six to ten people Woods in the Little Theater."
would be chosen from the class, Featured on Tuesday's program
and would meet with a member of was a discussion of "Birds and
SGC or a member of a special Their Flight" by Leonard W. Wing,
committee to write the evaluation. author of the book "Natural His-
tory of Birds."
Bess Tefft, the author of "Merrie
Maple, a book for teenage girls,
also spoke on the program.
"If a writer goes into his char-
Jo n . e acters deeply enough, they tell
him what they will do," she said,
1Ze , speaking of her approach to writ-
ing a book.
A prize in honor, of Prof. John
W. Reed of the Law School, chair-
man. of the Board in Control of A Iflssions
Student Publications, has ,been
created by nembers of the First
Baptist Church in cooperation UP a W r
with the School of Music.
The $50 prize, to be awarded in There has been a 68 per cent
an annual competition for a increase in applications for Sep-
church anthem, is'intended to en- tember admission to Wayne State
courage young musicians to add to University over last year, accord-
contemporary church music. ing to the university's admissions
Prof" Reed has been choir direc- office;
for of the First Baptist Church for Hugh E. 'Sarles, admissions di-
the past eight years, and under his rector, said that 426 applications
direction they have performed were received during February
music by Benjamin Britten, Aaron compared to 286 received the same
Copland, Flor Peeters and Samuel month a year ago.
Barber. He explained that it would be
The prize was authorized by the necessary to consider applications
University Regents last Friday. . received over a longer period of
Entries wil be invited from Uni-. time to determine if the February
versity students, especially those figures indicate a significant in-
in the ,composition classes of the crease in students seeking admis-
School of Music. Members of the sion.
School of Music faculty and Prof. There has been no change in
Reed will judge the anthems sub- admissions requirements, but due
mitted, which must be appropriate to the: elimination of the non-
for church services. Texts for the matriculation division, students in
anthems may be from either bibli- that category must file a formal
cal or non-biblical sources, application,' Sarles explained.

t
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c
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""1

Rostow Claims Competition
Best Base for Development
By MURRAY FEIWELL charged less than market prices,
Contending that the "pressure Rostow voiced the opinion that a
of effective competition is the most policy of low profits is "not very
reliable foundation for economic tenable for corporations, nor
development," Dean Eugene Victor sound."
Rostow continued the series of Saying that the basic service
William W. Cook lectures yester-r society looks to business for is
day. production of goods, Rostow point-
Lecturing on the topic "See- ed out that corporations have be-
ondary Tools of Control: Free and gun to interest themselves in edu-
Regulated Markets," Rostow dis- cation and other social fields.

v v

DEAN ROSTOW
. Cook lecturer
cussed the roles of competitive' and
monopolistic industries on the
American economy.
Rostow pointed out circum-
stances which arise during a de-
pression, explaining that mono-
polies cut their output and not
their prices.
Two Solutions Seen
Two solutions to the problem
may be an increase in both public
and private spending and the
restoration of full employment
.which -could be managed if and.
only if costs fell more than prices,
Rostow continued.'
Noticing a. trend since 1945 in
which corporations have actually

Calls on Government
Rostow called on the govern-
ment to adopt two lines of palicy
in improving the economy. First,
eliminate waste.
"We are no longer living in an
upside down world of depression,"
declared the dean. He continued by
pointing out the enormous destruc-
tion of capital in our cities through
mass movement of businesses to
suburbs..
Prevention of this lies in urban
planning and urban renewal, ac-
cording to Rostow.
More Productive Labor
Citing six steps to make the
country's labor force more produc-
tive, Rostow called for removal of
restrictions on apprenticeship, re-
organization of pension plans,
seniority rights and stock option
programs and creation of a truly
national market for labor.
Other remedies include revision
of laws and working agreements
for older people, and he added,
"We must enlarge our labor force
by liberalizing our immigration
laws."
Finally, Rostow called for Fed-
eral grants to education to
strengthen the nation. Rostow said
it is a national obligation to train
our youth in all phases of develop-
ment.
The fourth in the series of five
lectures will be given tomorrow at
4:15 in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Dean Rostow's topic is entitled "A
Review of Recent Experience."

DIAL
NO 2-3136
LAST
DAY !
g~ Y U L BRY N NE R
' MARIA SCHELL
'Fascinatingly CLAIRE BLOOM
Flamboyant . . . Fine, ,LICBALBERT
Absorbing, Brilliant" B- WMA SERATER
-bAs AVON PROUCTION
-News } in ETROCOLOR '

* Starts FRIDAY...!
ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER!

a J.
{!
1
! -,
4.
L
f

rU
TONIGHT and FRIDAY
7:00 and 9:00
"VIVA VILLA"
with
Wallace Beery, Leo Carillo,
Fay Wray
*
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at.8:00'
"TALES OF
HOFFMAN"
a.:A L

1
i

COMMA PICTURM-Spresents
A SAM SPIEGEL PRODUCTION
WiLLIAM HOLDEN
ALEC GUINNESS . JACK HAWKINS
THE BRIDGE
ONTHE RIVER R AI
CINEMASCOPE TECHNICOLORS
' th SESSUE HAYAKAWA'* JAMES DONALD + ANI SEARS.* and ntroductng GEOFFREY IORN9
Directe by DAVID L.EAN - Screenplay by PIERRE BOULLE eased on His Novel

Aft J tPRn

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