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March 21, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I,

DIAL
NO 2-3136

Students Rec
In Architect's

SOLD, SPLENDID FILM*
bes screen with turbulent passions and crimes. One
hes with stunned attention. Powerful acting of fine
--World-Tele. & Sun

Th
recel
pens
Anic
comn
o
won

'N

lkTUV R Tid5 t-7L'.UADAACV

e

TO

by '
~starring 'by 1%
YUL BRYNNER tect
a in th
MARIA SCHELL -CLAIRE BLOOM
-firsd
LEE A CqB."ALBERT SALMI med
vvis
T
able
erg
ded " TOM and JERRY Cartoon man
WS DAILY AT 1:10-3:50 - 6:30 - 9:10 P.M.
NIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
The Bolshoi Theatre
ortnance of Mussorgsky's
)ris God unovj" . ,
(COLOR)
with
grov, Khanayev, Nelepp,
and -other opera stars
(ENGLISH SUBTITLES).
turday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
Stanley Kramer's.
Ve Wil1d One"-
with
ton Brando, Mary Murphy
Robert Keith
HITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents
C-R-

tree University students have
ved awards for tuition ex-
es as a part of the Walter
ka Prize Sketch-Problems
petition.
ur other University student
honorable mentions inthe
.etition' devised,'and financed
Walter Anicka, a local archi-
rank E. Arens, '58AD, won $150
he advanced division, Roger A
nmel, 'GOAD, received $150 as
prize winner in 'the inter -
iate division. In the sam
ion $100 was given to Harvey
tne, '6OAD.
he four students given honor-
mention were Ralph T
gsma, '58AD, Robert L. Ziegel-
, '58AD, in the advanced class
The Whole T
cab

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
eive Awards - Senior Class
Competition Gift Causes
. . . . . .. . ..
and James Hackenberger, '0AD,Ctrovers
in the intermediate class.
s New quarters for a large sub- "I can't figure out where they
urban bank in a community com- would put it - I really can't,"
s parable to Ann Arbor was the answered Student Government
first division problem. In the in- Council President Joe Collins, '58,
onthe piece o modernistic sculp-
termediate ,class the problem was ture whch the ntire senior class
concerned with the design of ant.s
p exhibition pavilion and display is giving to the University.
. court for a brick manufacturer. Collins went on to say that the
s This is the second semester that money might have been spent
- prizes for thiscome t'ionhae moreappropriately,perhaps for a
Sbeen awarded.fund
s The sketches were required to Maynard Goldman, '59, SGC ad-
be finished in one weekend's time, ministrative vice-president was
- Anicka said. This limited time was more vehement in his opposition.
. to encourage quick creative think- He feels that it is ufortunate that
- ing and the ability to express the senior class was unable to col-
s ideas on paper. lect more money. '
Ex-president of the Union, Don
Young, '57, offering a different
criticism, suggested that senior
I E dues be collected from alumni fif-
Own sTalking teen or twenty years after grad-
uation. The alumni would be in a'
) ut better position to give money and
the larger donations would be
more profitable to the University.
Drake Duane, '58, IHC presi-
dent thinks the gift is interest-
ing - as a work of art. Yet he
wonders if it is a suitable item for
a class gift.
Council Candi
(continued from Pagel)
Peter Brown, u0, told Panhel-
lenic association's open house
that he was opposed to deferred
7. 1"rush. It is too long and drawn out,
"Personalized" he said; it simply does no good.
iyPaul Kampner, '59, also did not
Laundry ServiCe want to discuss women's spring
NDRY, SHIRT, and rush until the SGC report was
presented. However, he was op-
G SERVICE, posed to spring rush for men be-
UNDRY FACILITIES. cause "there are twice as many
fraternities and men as sorori-
RKING PROVIDED. ties and women," he told Sigma
Kappa sorority.
4-HOUR SERVICE . .. Kessel Defers Rush Opinion
REQUEST. Another candidate, David Kes-
RVICE WINDOWS for sel, Grad., had no policy on de-
ferred rush for women until the
PICK-UP. 'reports were in, he said at Stock-
DRIVE - $0 DELAY! well. The financial problem should
be considered, he said. However,
4the weather complaint isn't
N4ow Handle valid" as a reason for reverting to
fall .rush; "rain in the fall with
and LAB COATS all the Asian flu could have had
lpnalthe same effects."
ar, epen aue Bruce McRitchie, '59, is "ba-
SE RVICEsically" opposed to deferred rush.
He said the small sororities are
at a distinct disadvantage in de-
Kerred rush. The rushees set up
ARD STREET Where to go a
Evenings
e our own dry cleaningN
gnishing plants D
Saturday:
THE CLASSIFIEDS FREE'E
B'nai B'rith Hillel For
onienmaratras made to order-

The University's nuclear reac-!
tor,;now operating at one hunded
thousand watts, is. expected to
boost its power to one million
watts shortly, according to C. W.
Ricker of the Phoenix Project,
which runs the reactor.
When the reactor reaches one
million watts, its full power, It will
be the most' powerful nuclear re-,:
actor owned by a university. Oth-
er universities, however, ai plan-
ning more powerful reactors.
The University's nuclear engi-
neering program for graduates is
one of the largest in the country,
having 1 11 students, according to
Ricker. There is also a reactor
training program for those who
are interested in operating reac-
tors, in which eight students are
enrolled. -
The reactor, finished in Novem-
ber, 1956, is still under evaluation
by the staff, presently running
evaluation tests. Later, there will
be tests to determine the effects
of- radiation on matter. There will
be study innon-scientific areas as
well as scientific research.
At present there is some study
on the effects of radiation on
chemical processes.
The reactor, located on North
Campus, entered the planning
stage in the early 1950's. Con-
struction of the building took two
years, Ricker said.

Ricker Says Reactor To Boost Power

ONE 'MILLION WATTS-The power of the Universi
reactor will soon be increased, making the reactor
college-owned one in the countrY.

'S flu

idates Face Sorority Spring Rush Issue

1

w..

_ . :

The Home
Dry Cleaning

of
an

iro
E

. _

DRIVE-IN LAU
DRY CLEAN INC
*SELF-SERVE LAI
OFF-STREET PA
* DEPENDABLE 2
ONE-HOUR ON
*TWO AUTO SE
DROP-OFF and
LARGE DOUBLE
We Can P
WASH PANTS
on our regul
24-HOUI
K W.IK .I
740 PACK
OpenI
We own and operat
and shirt f
EAD AND USE

a "pseudo-standard" concerning Students don't need a semester
what houses they want, and are to adjust to the campus, he said;
disappointed when they fail to this argument of spring rush ad-,
get them, he said. vocates does not hold. Rushing, he
He said theargument'that stressed, is not compulsory in the
grades were improved by spring fall, if a student does not feel he
rush was not true. or sloe is sufficiently well-adjusted
Merrill Against Spring Rush to rush.,
Sue Rockne, ,80, termed It an
Fred Merrill, '59, saw only two "unfair assumption" that women
arguments for deferred rushing, must have only one rush a year.
from an all-campus standpoint. Men rush twice, she told, Scott
He listed these as permitting House, and women should also.
greater studying in the fall, and There is a year's wait-for anyone
the chance that first semester
freshmen were not capable of who Is undecided, she noted.
making the choice. . In regard to men's rush, she
makingr thesecnieain noted an Interfraternity-Inter-
However, these considerations House Council survey indicated
were not enough to warranttehe present twice-a-year system
adoption of the. policy, he said.thprsntwc-yerstm
H ppi f should be continied. "I don't see
He opposed deferred rushing for why this is an isue," Miss Rockne
both men ad women. said.
Another candidate favoring fall Seasnwein Needs Evidence
rush was Dick Odgers, '59. No one Roger Seasonwein, '61, told
is forced to rush in the fall, he Stockwell he wants to see conclu-
said; persons favoring spring rush sive evidence before 'making up
fail to recognize this, however, he his mindondeferred rushing. He
told Delta Gamma. At Sigma told Gamma Phi Beta he had
Kappa, Odgers' noted deferred heard many complaints from both,
rush was good from the fresh- rushees and actives about, the
man's standpoint, but the emo- length of the women's rush peiod,
tional adjustment of freshmen the weather, and other problems.
isn't the primary, problem, he said. h etead te rbes
At Delta Gamma, Seasonwein
called deferred rushing for wo-
men "not good," remarking that
fter the show ? although women's marks were
improved last semester from the
fall term last year, no conclusions
ould be drawn until spring marks
l1 A41004uwyv t could be compared also.
Also, rushees set their hearts
10-12 P.M. on particular houses, and suffer
a "rather large shock's when they
fail to make those houses, he said.
(ERYONE WELCOME "I am against deferred rush-
- Ing in both fraternities and sor-'
ondatiow -1429, H ill

orities," David Taylor, '60, toId
Chi Omega sorority.
"Basically, I am running on a
fraternity-sorority ticket. You
might sa ythat I am out for the
affiliate vote," Taylor slid. If
Panhel opposed deferred rush he
also would oppose it, he said.
"I am pretty sure that I will
back the IFC and Fraternity Pres-
idents' Assembly in any decisions
which they make." Taylor added.
He said he was running for SGC
because issues such as deferred
rushing are important to affili-
ates. He wants to be able to dis-.
cuss and vote on these issues, he
said.
Mort Wise, '59, said women
were better adjusted to their aca-
demic obligations by spring rush,;
but withheldecision on the is-
sue until the reports are pub-
lished.
Would Increase "Dirty Rush"
He is opposed to deferred rush-
ing for men, he told Alpha Xi
Delta. The smaller houses would
be "hard hit," he said, and "dirty
rushing" would increase substan-
tially. There is no real benefit to
freshmen.
"The pressure of rushing should
not be thrown on,the affiliates at
this time of year," Lol Wurster,
'60, told Gamma Phi Beta. The
pressure of rushing can be taken
much more easily in the fall, she
said. Rushing immediately after
finals is too great a strain on both
rushees and actives.,
In addition, contact rules don't
permit rushees to get to know the
affiliates; "their opinions must be
formed second-hand. Women tend
to stereotype the houses in a se-
mester," she said.

-!

:.
a'

e

U

U

Mr bonwitr

-- -----------

for at?-weather comfort. Gat a demonstratiotf

...,.... ..
. ° tir {/y/ ' y '
': . Ayy.. .ya r y. .; ',q y

TO OCEN ACROSSW H
CA-ACD BAC -I 41 IPMRS
/Y'S NEW V8 lEVELS
HIGHEST, HARDEST
IWAY OVER THE ANDES I

To prove the durability of Cheer-
rolet's radical new Turbo-Thrust
V8,* the tremendous flexibility of
the new Turboglide transmission,*
the incredible smoothness of Fall
Coil suspension, we tackled the most
challenging transcontinental road in
the world -- the 1,000-mile General
San Martin Highway. To make it
harder, the Automobile Club of
Argentina sealed the hood shut at
Buenos Aires - no chance .to add
oil or water or adjust carburetors
for high altitude.
So the run began - across the
blazing Argentine pampas, ino the
ramparts of the forbidding Andes.
Up and up the road climbed, almost
22 miles in the sky! Drivers
gasped for oxygen at 12,572 feet -
but the Turbo-Thrust YB never
slackened its torrent of power, the
Full Coil springs smothered every
bump, the Turboglide transmission
made play of grades up to 30
percent. Then a plunge to the
Pacific at Valparaiso, Chile, a
quick turn-around and back again.
Time for' the round trip: 41 hours
14 minutes - and the engine was
never turned off!i

'14
A r I
<z
r~

TODAY
and Sat.

4k

DIAL
NO 8-6416

; 9.4

Sunday Recital To Feature
Brass, Percussion Music
The "Symphony for Brass and. mantic' character, or to the trum-
Percussion " composed by Guntherpethnisuflesinafrs
Schuller, French horn player with Than ts sefulonesssinrfanre
the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra The symphony is very anti-
and he oldan Bndwil bephonal using two choirs of trum-
and the oldmananda wi- b pets with three trumpets in each
the featured work at a, recital to pt ihtretupt nec
be given by Joseph Hanchrow at choir. The remaining instrumen.
be givn byCation includes four French horns
8:30 p.m. onMarch 23 in Aud. A, three trombones, two euphoniums
Angell Hall. one tuba which is played by Han.
Robert Hause, '58SM, will con- chrow, tympani and suspendec
duct a brass ensemble made up hand cymbals.
ofrch7smembers of the Univertsity The remaining portion of t4
Orchestra and Band, recital will feat e Hanchrow play.
The composition is unique be- ing various pices arranged foi
cause, as Schuller said, "this piece tuba accompanied by Cynthia Con,
will demonstrate that the mem- way, '59SM. He will play Beetho-
bers of the brass family are not ven "Horn Sonata," two bass aria:
limited to the stereotypes of ex-, from Mozart's Die Zauberflote
pression usually associated with "Concert Music for Bass Tuba" b;
them. Prof. Florian Mueller of the muss,
w "Thus, there is more to therhorn school and the Handel Oboe
than its "heroic' or 'noble' or 'ro- Sonata.x
M ANDIAL NO 2-2513
owing Versions HELD OVER!
AL CAST
-GLEN GRAY
US-C MAprNsmervetoGM CAMERA 65
A'U S IC MAN MONTGOMERY CUFT
P3 333 ftYT11 TAI Aa

Week Nights at 7 and 9 P.M. W Saturday and Sunday from 1 P.M.

: .

..: r..":. .". '

THE

MUSIC

Broadwag's Newest Hit In the Folb
THE MUSIC MAN-ORIGIN
DANCE TO THE MUSIC MAN-
w -.
for Dancers
JIMMY GUIFFRE PLAYS THE M

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