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March 12, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I"

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED:
students'To Debate Cyprus in Mock UN

Music School To Present
Mendelssohn's 'Elijah'

By RALPH LANGER
idents from 57 countries will
te the Cyprus issue in a simu-
i United Nations meeting at
am. Saturday in Rackham
torium.
ie Campus UN, sponsored by
Jnion in cooperation with the
national Students Associa-
will be the largest in the
I outside of the actual Gen-
Assembly. f
ne hundred and twenty-six
gn students will represent
countries in the two-session
nbly with all nations repre-
ed by citizens of that country
;t Russia. James Elsman, '58,
tdent of Soviet affairs, has
ented to represent the U.S.S.R.
ie assembly will debate the
ution drawn up by a plan-
committee selected by the
e resolution which provides
a, ten-year trusteeship under
UN and administered by the
rates and representing the
continents of the world.
ed Kingdom is pointed at
ng the government ultimate-
n the hands of the Cypriot
le.
Le three-countries basically in-

v o 1 v e d, Greece, Turkey and
Britain, all have claims to the is-
land of Cyprus. Britain because
Cyprus is a colony, and Greece
and Turkey because they consti-
tute the population of the island.
Both the Greeks and the Turks
want the British to leave but dis-
agree on the island's status after
this. Some Greeks want annexa-
tion to Greece and since 80 per
cent of the island's population is
of Greek origin a popular vote
would put the island's fate in
Greek hands.
The remaining 20 per cent of
the population is Turkish and they
advocate a "self-determination"
course for Cyprus. The Turkish
concept of self-determination de-
mands consideration for the mi-
nority and would not allow disre-
gard of the 20 per cent Turkish
minority.
Controversy is currently raging
over the possible conduct of a ple-
biscite to determine the fate of
the island and also what effect
a vote should have in face of the
overwhelming majority of Greeks
in the population.
Joe Collins,, former Student
Government Council president,
'58, will act as president of the

assembly which will meet in two
sessions and give the day's proce-
dure in opening ceremonies.
The assembly will be opened by
Prof. Inis L. Claude of the politi-
cal science department, who will
discuss the role of the UN in the
world today.
To Present Resolution
Following the opening ceremo-
nies the resolution will be pre-
sented by Antonio Ledsma-Lanz'
of the drafting committee.,
Pro fessor
S PCiSS
U.S., Polic4

College Roundup

Debate, consisting of 15 minute
speeches will open with the three
major countries involved. Greece,
Turkey and the United Kingdom,
each explaining their country's
position.
Following these preliminary
speeches there will be nine more
by countrys who indicated a direct
national interested in the island's
fate. Allotted 10 minutes each are:
Canada, China, Egypt, Ghana, In-
dia, Iraq, Israel, Italy, and Leban-
on.
Debate to Continue
After lunch, debate will con-
tinue with six more ten minute.
speeches from Norway, Pakistan,
Philippines, United States, Russia,
and Venezuela.
Greece, Turkey, and the United
Kingdom will then be allowed a
ten minute retort each to answer
or explain anything which has
been brought up previously. Vo4t.,
ing on the resolution will then
begin immediately.
One amendment, chosen from
five which were submitted in re-
hearsal last Saturday, will be dis-
cussed in four, five- m i n u t e
speeches.
A roll call vote will be taken on
the amendment and a show of
hands for individual points of the
original resolution. A roll call vote
will also be taken on the final
resolution during which each
country is allotted two minutes to
explain, if they wish, why they
are voting as they are.
Ann Arbor's mayor, Prof. Sam-
uel J. Eldersveld of the political
science department, will close the
assembly with a 'short speech.
Club To Hold,
First Meeting
The Medical Technologists So-
ciety will hold its first official
meeting at 7 p.m. tomorrow in
the League; the room will be
posted.
The society, which went inac-
tive last year, reactivated recently.
Its newly elected officers are: Sue
Stokes, '59, president; Elizabeth
Fries, '59; vice-president and pro-
gram chairman; Meriditt Miller,
'59, secretary; and Mary E. King,
'59, treasurer.
Faculty advisor for the club is
Miss Florence Hartsuff, - head
technologist at the Outpatient
Clinical Laboratory.

The School of Music will pre-
sent Mendelssohn's "Elijah" at
8:30 p.m. tonight in Hill Audi-
torium.
Four soloists and the 276 mem-
bers of the University Choir will
perform, with the 49-piece Uni-
versity Symphony orchestra.
Soprano soloist will be Prof.
Frances Greer, of the School of
Music. Miss Greer, was leading
soloist of the Philadelphia Opera
Co. from 1939 to 1941, and has
performed under conductors Bru-
no Walter, Eugene Ormandy, and
Dimitri Mitropulas.

Contralto soloist will be Arlene
Sollenberger, instructor of music.
Prof. Philip Duey of the School
of Music is bass soloist. Duey is
director of the Men's Glee Club
and a veteran of Broadway and
radio.
Tenor solos will be sung by
Richard Miller, instructor in
voice, who has performed in 260
operatic works in Europe.
Qualities of both the Baroque
and Romantic music schools are
combined in the oratorio, which
ranks with Handel's "Messiah"
as a world favorite.

_ _ ....,.u,,.. .

Ending
TONIGHT

-Y
'I

Week Nights
at
7 and 9 P.M.

w

DIAL NO 8-6416

"FRANCS FIRST FUNNY MAN
having a high old time with
jliclutamsr and haute couture!"
N 1:n'rret

FONDLm
DRE$WIE

...Opens THURSDAY . .
Gala First Anniversary Program!
THE HILARIOUS
"GREEN MAN"
IS AT IT
AGAIN!

By SELMA SAWAYA
fIAjVMWTN -- The senior class
iml of Northwestern Univer-
y recently named the. North-
stern University Press recipient
this year's senior class ift.
1he contribution to the Press
aapproved by a 31-20 vote, ad
eated the motion to contribute
faculty salaries.
E'heN council said that money
m' the class fund, to be collect-
in the spring, would be given
the Press "in unrestricted form
Press officials to use as they
nit."'.
Ilitxinated in a primary vote by
council were an international
ations fund, a class scholarship
:I a library contribution. The
l for this year's fund has been
tativey set for between $4,500
: $5,000.T
* * *
WADISON-History of Science,
relatively new department on
Madison campus, has devel-
d in recent years to such an ex-
t that today theUniversitY of
sconsin is considered a national
der in the discipline.r
of. Marshall Clagett, chair-
n of the History of Science de-
tment, pointed out that Wis-
iin is one of only four uni-
sities, in the United States
ich offers a sustained program
this area through the graduate
el.
'h1e University of Wisconsin
's publishes extensively in the
;tory of Science field, he added.
e area covers the development,
6 and itportance of science as
>art of the totality of a culture.
Prof. Clagett remarked that
ut 300 students are enrolled
thes lntroductoiy course which
Wvdes non-lab science credit
:the 'undergraduate. In addi-
,n, he said, a full schedule of ad-
iced courses is available for
tdenits majoring or minoring in
field.
to the publishing area, rof.
gett said that the Press hats in-
gurated a series called "Publi-
ions in Medieval Science," and
ns are made for further publi-
4ons in the area of scientific
tory.
YRAUSE - Syracuse Uni-
sity has now instituted a new
icy for dropping courses.
Paul J. Sedgwick, chairman of
Sub-Committee on Instruc-
ml Proceduresesaid the new
icy is more "lenient," in that
allows the student more time
evaluate his progress in the
irse before making his decision.
7nder the old policy, students
I to drop a course within 28
s after the first day of classes
order to avoid a penalty. Now
University Senate has ap-
ved the new ruling which a-
's the student to consider until
week after the mid-semester
n accepting this new policy, the
ate also approved a plan
ereby students who dropped
rses after the "final" date
uld have the grades recorded on
Ir transcripts in a different{
surer.
'reviously, all s t u d e n t s-who
hdrew after the prescribed
e were marked in the same

SEE FOR YOURSELFWY TEfCALI
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manner. Under the new plan, a
student who withdraws after the
mid-semester date will have the
grade in the course recorded as
either "withdrawn, passing" or
"withdrawn, failing." .
Sedgwick feels, this will elimi-
nate the lack of distinction be-
tween those students who dropped
while failing, and those who
dropped but had still maintained
a passing average in the course.
ducted by the Illinois Institute of
Technology, it was revealed that
outside employment has a definite
effect on a college student's
grades.. -
Results of the survey, which
consisted of recording the work
activity of more than 100 students
for a typical one-week period in
the, school year, showed that stu-
dents who worked more than 12
hours per week have somewhat
lower grades than those working
fewer hours or none at all.
The results prompted the ques-
tion, "Does a student have to be
extra intelligent to work his way
through college?"
x According to the survey, stu-
dents working more than 20 hours
each week had significantly high-
er scores on the college entrance
examinations than those who
worked less or not at all.
Administrators of the test com-
mented that "as the student in-
creased working time, he did not
correspondingly decrease study
time, but, in a wider sense, simply
worked longer."

ii

V fj PA 3L
ui l

Dial
NO 2-31136

PROF. HENI4Y L. BRETTON
... to speak tomorrow
Prof. Henry L. Bretton of the
political science department will
speak at '7:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Rm. 3A of the Union on "Divest-
ing the Fundamental Concepts of
the American Policy. of Bunk."
Prof. Bretton has recently re-
turned from Austria where he was,
a Fulbright lecturer at the Uni-
versity of Innsbruck. He will dis-
cuss some of the basic misconcep-
tions of American foreign policy,
and postulate fresh prop'ositions
concerning international rela-
tions.
The lecture, which is being
sponsored by the Young Republi-
can Club, is open to the public.

SEE THESE DARING SCENES:
A visiting Southern- beauty disrupts a small.town
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fession of a runaway wife* A young lover tries to forget
by going off to battle * The golden-haired girl who
waited '"I love you. I've always loved you."* Rendezvous
at the Raintree.
M-G-M PRESENTS in MGM CAMERA 65
MONTGOMERY CLIFT
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
EVA MARIE SAINT
- X E O-
In the great tradition of Civil War Romance
NIGEL PATRICK -LEE MARVIN
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ECabyMILLARD KARFMAN RYiwite Prft er *. "o AV.Msn Mge. Jr
Print by'rECHNICOLR. Oroa br EDWVARD DMYTRYK." rmeow bex DAVI D LEWIS_

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I .

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sShows at
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MAJOR IN'LADRSI
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GREK WEK presents:
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March 17 .. 8:00 Hill Auditorium
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