100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Geologist Explains Work
On Antarctica Ice Shelf.
American and Soviet scientists
who took part in International learning to negotiate trails could
Geophysical Year projects this the scientists continue their work.
winter in Antarctica, "hit it off Besides gathering specimens of
fine," said Prof. James H. Zum- ice crystals within the crevasses,
berge of the geology department. the group analyzed structural
Prof. Zumberge returned this properties of the ice in the "cold"
week after spending six months in laboratory they had set up at
Antarctica, where he was chief Camp Michigan. This research,
glaciologist for one of the United Prof. Zumberge said, could lead
States IGY parties which studied toinformation on how mountains
taeRos IYpteS whchstuie and other earth features are
the Ross Ice Shelf. rmd
He said that he, was impressed formed.
by the Russians' hosjpitality, and Gather Information
"there were no second-raters" on Information gathered on how
their team. Scientists from five quickly the crevasses open could
other countries also took -part in be immediately valuable, he said,
the scientific studies in Antarctica. in determining how long bases on
Tested Ice the ice shelf would be useful to
Prof. Zumberge went to Antarc- the United States.
tica in September, 195'?, to learn The biggest problem which faced
how the Ross Ice Shelf; near the the group at Camp Michigan was
Bay of Wales, reacts to horizon the lack of water there. "We had
pressare, to melt ice most of the time," he
His first step upon arriving on explained.
the continent was to found Camp Between now and the time he
Michigan, 1headquarters for re- resumes teaching duties next fall,
search activitigs.aThe camp was Prof. Zumberge will be studying
located in a.heavilye Tievassed area, Navy photographs of the research
with soine crevasses more than area and specimens collected
100 sfeet deep. which substantiate his belief that
To measure the stresses and chemical as well as physical
pressures imposed on the ice, Prof. weathering takes place in cold
Zumberge used "strain gauges." areas.
He was the first to try these in-
struments, usually employed for
testing strains on concrete and
steel in a laboratory, for research
with ice. Dine Talk
Run WrAver At

GriffinWins
Archaeology
Fund Medal
Prof. James B. Griffin of the
anthropology department was
awarded the Viking Fund Medal,
archaeology's highest award, last
Friday.
The Society for American Ar-
chaeology presents the gold medal
and $1,000 each year for outstand-
ing work in archaeology.
Prof. Griffin, who became direc-
tor and curator of archaeology in
the University Museum of Anthro-

r

Ii

'I

The Michigan Chapter of the
Society of the Sigma Xi has an-
nounced that the dinner for initi-
ates will be held at 6:15 p.m. to-
morrow in the Ballroom of the
Michigan League.
The dinner will be followed by a
Sigma Xi National lecture, "The
World of Fine Particles," to be
delivered by Prof. John Turkevich
of Princeton University's chemistry
department.
The lecture will be at 8:00 p.m.
in Rackham Lecture Hall and is
open to the public.
During World War II Prof.
Turkevich was one of the original'
workers on the Manhatten project
and is still active in atomic energy,
being a consultant to the United
States Atomic Energy Commission
at Washington and the Brook-
haven National Laboratory.

.

PROF. JAMES B. GRIFFIN
.. wins award
pology in 1946, has been associated
with the University for 25 years.
He is head of a six-man committee
to negotiate for archaeological
samples and name priorities for
dating them by radiocarbon.
Born in Kansas, he received his
masters degree in anthropology
from the University of Chicago,
and his Doctor of Philosophy from
the University.
Prof. Gifnln has been very active
in field and laboratory work, tak-
ing part in field trips and doing
research work in the United States
and Central Mexico. In the fall of
1953 he went abroad for a year to
study northern Eurasian prehistory
in European museums.

with a
tailored hair style by
715 North University

'The Michigan Daily

Subscribe to0

.4"
"{

Tomorrow

is the

£

r
S9

t

A

That's why American Express Student Tours are expertly
planned to include a full measure of individual leisure-
ample free time to discover your Europe-as well as
the most comp~rehensive sight-seeing pro am available
anywhere! Vist England, Scotland, re Holland,
Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, The
Rivieras and France-accompanied by distinguished
tour leaders-enjoy superb American Express service
throughout.
10 Special Tours ... 48 to.63 days... via famous ships;
United States, Liberte, Nieuw Amsterdam, Atlantic,
Italia, New York. $1,198 up.
Other tours available.., from 35 days ... $769 up.
You can always
TRAVEL NOW-PAY LATER
when you go American Express!
For complete information, see your
Campus Representative,
local Travel Agent or
American ExpressI
Travel Service,
member: Institute>of
International Education and Council
on Student Travel
... or simply mail the handy coupon.

f +
"
"
"
"

s
s
D.
p

Are you ready, willing
and able to consider
OUT-OF-THIS WORLD
--- - -
ENGINEERING
4P OPPORTUNITIES
Hamilton Standard is emerging as one of
the most dynamic, proliflc, respected and
pioneering organizations in the concep-
tion and creation of missile, 'rocket and
general equipment for ultra advanced
"" aircraft. If this appeols to you as much
as it apparently does to other engineering
graduates...circle your calendar with
the date, time and place eow

I

...N IMNU

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan