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February 21, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUAI~Y 21, 1931

Psychologist Criticizes
Disciplie of U.S. Youth

By RICHARD CONDON
American GI's inte Korean War
indicates a deficiency' in our dis-
ciplinary education of youth.
Army psychologist Major Wil-
liamb Meyor revealed this as one
of the results of his extensive sur-
behavior, in Chinese Communist
camps Wednesday night when he
addressed the Political Issues Club
by means of a ,tape recording.
Contrary to popular belief,
brainwashing is not a torture
process but a well-ordered educa-
tional program. A democracy con-
tains two powerful defensive
weapons to counter this; its ide-
ology and superior character dis-
cipline. If the ideology is broken
and the discipline lacking, Amern-'
cans become fallible to their in-
doctrination.
Three Premises Held
The brainwashing program was
undertaken with three majior pre-
mises. First, Americans are ma-
terialistic and can be bought;
second, they are ignorant to the
principles of their own political
system, and finally, they are not
loyal citizens. With these in mind
lutionary program for prisoner of
war relations.
Men who showed potential lead-
ership were separated from the
other prisoners. This amounted to
olaly five per cent. The rest were
then made to feel apart from
their fellow captives by the cre-
ation of an informer system. It
has been estimated that one out
of every 10 prisoners was an in-
former. This resulted in creating
a sense of insecurity and isolation
and thwarting any active con-
spiracy before it began.
Mail was not censored, though
intimate letters were withheld and
"Dear Johns" always arrived on
time. Spirilt among the troops
fell greatly as a result of this.

At this point the men, most of
whom had received little educa-
tion, were sent to school. They at-
tended sociology and political sci-
ence lectures and participated in
roundtable discussions. The Chi-
nese treated themi hospitably and
no physical pressure was admin-
istered. They were even permitted
to play baseball on the stipulation
that they cooperate. The coopera-
tion consisted of writing propa-
ganda leaflets.
The overall result was an indif-
ferent attitude toward the Com-
munist system and the publica-
tion of numerous propaganda
materials.
Meyor concludes that the rea-
sons for this success are due to
frailties in the soldiers' charac-
ters. These he lists as lack of
leadership and discipline, no will
to resist and a tendency to give
up.
Dinner Honors
Prof. Hugh E. Keeler of the
engineering college received a
service award from the Michigan
Society of Professional Engineers
at a banquet held Wednesday at
the Michigan Union.
Professors-emeritus Alfred :H.
Lovell and Charles T. Holmstead
also received awards.
Prof. Keeler is a founder and
a former president of the society.
'Prof. Lovell was honored for his
long service in teaching. He was
on the faculty of the college from
1913 to 1944, and was chairman of
the electrical engineering depart-
ment for nine years.
Prof. Holmstead also received
his award for long service to the
engineering profession.

JETS:
Lengthen
Engineers will soon begin plans
to lengthen the instrument land-
ing runway at Detroit-Willow Run
Airport from 7,366 feet to 8,400
Te increase will permit the jet
aircraft due in late 1959 and 1960
to land and take off with maxi-
mum safety. Robert E. Miller,
President of Airlines Terminal
plained that the Board of Direc-
tors of his firm has approved a
plan which would provide detailed
plans and specifications for adding
the extra footage to the huge
facility.
An Owosso engineering firm will
begin field survey work as soon
as weather conditions permit,
Miller said.
Prof. Solomon E. Asch of the
psychology department of Swarth-
more College will speak on "Per-
ceptual Conditions of Associations"
atg4:15 pm. today in Aud. B,
The lecture, part of the Psy-
chology Colloquiung series, will
mark the second appearance of
Prof.1 Asch at the University. He
spoke here four years ago.
The lecture is open to the pub-
lic.

PIZZA

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4

Author of the provoking and controversial book PROTES-
TANT - CATHOLIC - JEW: An Essay in American
Religious Sociology-
Professor of Judaic Studies and Social Philosophy, Drew
University-
Also author of JUDAISM AND MODERN MAN: An
Interpretation of Jewish Religion and FOUR EXISTEN-
TIALIST THEOLOGIANS-
avill speak an
"SOCIALISM, ZIONISM and
MESSIANIC PASSION"
at a joint SABBATH SERVICE with Beth-Israel Center
Tonghtat 7:45
Hillel Choir; Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation . . . 1429 Hill St.

PASSING OF AN ERA--The lone gray Romance Language Building was built 80 years ago in an age
that saw structures erected to depict the function they served. The RLB was originally designed as
a natural history museum and later became the home of the Romance Language department.

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READ AND USE THE CLASSIFIEDS

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If you have tried the rest - try the BEST-
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From 6 P.M. to 12 P.M.
BEER and WINE to take out
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Hours 4 to 12 P.M. - Closed Tuesday

~i'tic 9m ~iciet
announces
50 MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS REMAINING FOR SPRING SEMESTER
Sprng eete Pog*
Feb. 24-LES ENFANTS DU PARADIS (dir, by Carne French, 1943 -- with Jean-Louis
Barrault)-at 7:30 p.m.
Mar. 10-INTOLERANCE (dir, by D. W. Griffith, U. S., 1915-with Lillian Gish)
Mar. 31-QUA! DES BRUMES (PORT OF SHADOWS) (dir, by Carme, French, 1938--with
Jean Gabin qrnd Michele Morgan); and PARADE (Eames, U. S. 1953)
'Apr. 28-FOOLISH WIVES (dir, by Erich von Sroheim, U. S., 1922)
May 22-THE SOUTHERNER (dir, by Renoir, U. S., 1945); and THE BESPOKE OVERCOAT
(by Wolf Mankowitz, English, 1955)
ALL SHOWINGS are on Monday evenings, in the Rackham Ampitheatre; they begin at 8 P.M.,
except that of Feb. 24(beginning at 7:30 P.M.) Admission is by membership subscription
only. A subscription for the Spring semester series costs $2.50; the cost is pro-rated fbr late
joiners. For information, call NOrmandy 3-1430, or NOrmandy 3-3665, or NOrmandy 3-1511
Ext. 2844.

.1

TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
H ITCH COCK'S
"trangers on a Train"
with
FARLEY GRANGER
RUTH ROMAN
ROBERT WALKER
Saturday at 7:008and 9:00
with
JANE WYMAN
STERLING HAYDEN
NANCY OLSON
A RCH ITE CTU RE AU D ITOR IUM
50 t

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A Campus-to-Career Case History
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Fe'OLUM5IA PICTURES prsents
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DIAL NO 2-2513
Due to extreme length,
only four shows daily
AND AN EXQUISFTE NEW JAPANESE
~STAR 1N5AOK

U of M LECTURE COURSE
Is Honored to Present
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