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February 19, 1957 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-19

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. FERRITAR.Y' 1lf°_ 'f!# .5 l

PAE.W H M C I A N D I Y i.V fA U TI TT U V 10 1 M

a.vANJ FJ~ J' " AV'JM 1.J.7, £y7FI

IN DEBATE:
Group Sees Plebiscite
As Answer in Kashmir

CURIOUS PHENOMENA:
Uranium, Radium Rays
Reveal Atom's Secrets

1

1

I

N'

(Continued from Page 1)

Kashmir Is an integral part of
India, it can be compared with the
position of California in the United
States.
India Not Theocratic
India is not a theocratic state,
many religious minorities are re-
spected in the country. "Fortu-
nately or unfortunately, Hindus
and Moslems are a part of the
same nation and the Moslems in
Wethy Elected
I Academy
Prof. Harold E. Wethey of the
Fire Arts department was recently
elected to the Royal Academy of
Fine Arts of San Fernando.
Honored for his research and
contribution to knowledge of
Spanish art, the award represents
the maximum recognition given to
a foreign art historian by the
Spanish society.
The authority on Spanish art
and Spanish colonial art and sculp-
ture in Peru is presently working
on a book on El Greco. His latest
book on the life and work of
Alonso Cano, a Spanish artist of
the 17th century, was published
last year.

Kashmir are respected as other
minorities are in India."
Ind dia has always accepted
United Nations resolutions if they
are fair. "Can India accept enemy
troops, such as the U.N.E.F. in its
own land?" Srivastva questioned.
Unfavorable opinions toward
Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal
Nehru were expressed by the rep-
resentatives of many nations.
Fikret Semin of Turkey com-
mented, "Nehru preaches one
thing and practices another."
'Not Peace Angel'
Reichert said, "Nehru has been
extremely over-estimated by the
free world, he is not a peace angel,
he is an Indian nationalist."
Jose Armilla of the Philippines
compared Nehru with Chou En-
Lai. Both are .two-faced and must
be dealt with in a shrewd manner
as if they have no moral preten-
tions, he said.
Armilla further advocated use
of force by the United States in
settling the dispute.
Arthur Bekeover stated the po-
sition of the United States in the
debate pointing out that the U.S.
was the co-sponsor of six of the
eleven resolutions solving the
Kashmir problem which were
vetoed by Krishna Menon, Indian
delegate to the United Nations.
He concluded all nations are en-
titled to self determination.

fourth in a series of nine articles
concerning the atom, atomic energy,
its utilization and the important
scientists who contributed to the ad-
vancement of the atomic age.)
By GERALD LUNDY
Perhaps the most curious and
mystifying natural phenomena
known to man fs that property of
some metals called radiation.
How does a metal such as uran-
ium or radium release rays which
at once are harmful and benefi-
cial to life?
To answer this question one
must look back nearly 50 years
after the death of Dalton.
In 1895 a giant step in the di-
rection of harnessing the energy
of the atom was taken in the sun-
lit laboratory of ,Wilhelm Roent-
gen, a German physicist.
He worked with an oddly
shaped glass tube which gave off
a pale glow at one end.
The tube, an electron tube, has
at its opposite ends negatively
and positive charged plates con-
nected to an electric circuit.
Opposites Attract
Invisible to the eye, a stream of
negatively charged particles dash
about in the vacuum tube in a
mad rush for the positively
chargedsplaterbecause opposite
electrical charges attract each
other.
At the end where the electrons
seem to strike the wall of the tube
a green glow flickers.
Suddenly the experimentor was
surprised by a weird sight. A
fluorescent screen which he was
using in his experiments began
to glow in the semi-darkness al-
though there weren't any stray
electrons in the room to cause it
to glow.
Then he placed his hand be-
tween the electron tube and the
screen and was amazed to dis-
cover he could seen the bones of
his own hand in the greenish glow
of the screen.
New Discovery
Roentgen at once knew he had
discovered a hitherto unknown
ray and because he didn't know
its nature, he called it "X-ray."
Following Roentgen's discovery,
the French scientist Becquerel in
1896 made experiments with the
fluorescence electrons make when
they come to sudden halts against
hard objects.
His materials included uranium,
a metal known to make certain
materials fluorescent under spe-
cial conditions.
Becquerel placed uranium salts
in thick wrappers and placed this
small bundle on an undeveloped
photograph plate.-
After developing the film he
found that in places the film had
been exposed by the action of rays
similar to X-rays..

The famous French scientistsa
Pierre and Marie Curie took the
next step in the study of radia-
tion which ultimately would lead
to the collapse of the then cur-
rent concept of the indestructible
atom.
For a while the two worked onlyI
with uranium ore samples, butI
they wanted some material which
had a stronger radiation property.
The Curies
They found what they were
seeking in radium - a metal so
radioactive that a tiny bit of it
emits light in darkness-2,000,000
times more radioactive than uran-
ium.
Expecting that radiation was
related to electrons they used a
magnet to deflect any negatively
charged particles (electrons) to
its positive pole since opposite
charges attract
The devised a primitive ances-
tor to the modern nuclear gun -
a block of lead with a spherical
hollow inside connected to the
outside by a small channel
through which particles could es-
cape in a straight line.
To the front of the gun's
"muzzle" a fluorescent screen was
placed because a charged particle
halting suddenly, releases rays
causing a minute flash on the face
of the screen.
The Curies obviously expected
charged electron particles to
prompt this action.
Any Particle
If unhampered, any particle
could fly to the screen in a
straight line making a continuous
flash on the face of the screen
if they landed on the same spot.
But if they were deflected be-
cause of the charge that they beat
due to the effect of the magnet
they would appear irregularly at
differing points on the screen.
At the first, firing particles
were deflected to the negative
pole of the magnet. These par-
ticles bore positive charges. Marie
called them Alpha rays.
Other particles were attracted
to the positive pole hence bearing
a negative charge. They were
named Beta rays.
But one true ray was evident
and since a ray can neither be
positive nor negatively charged
its light remained in one place on
the screen, uneffected by the
magnet. This ray was called the
Gamma ray - similar to the X-
ray only more powerful.
Drill Club To Meet
Crop and Saddle, drill team divi-
sion of the Riding Club, will meet
at 7 p.m. tonight in front of the
Women's Athletic Building.
To reserve a horse for riding,
call Jane Briggs, club manager at
NO 2-3225.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES

REAL ESTATE
THE
BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS

LINES
2

I DAY
.75

3 DAYS
1.87

6 DAYS
2.78

3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
HELP WANTED
MANAGEMENT POSITION for woman
between 30 and 50 years of age for
a leading national company. This is
a real opportunity for a career of
importance with permanent income.
Should have attractive personality.
Business experience not essential. Car
helpful. For appointment call NO 3-
5058, mornings 9-12. )H90
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. )H20

(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8
Phone NO 3-0800

)RI

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: clean, quiet, single room.
Close to campus - near St. Joseph's.
Reasonable rent. Call NO 3-5400 aft-
er 4.
DO YOU WANT lower rent? 2 bedroom
furnished cottage, Portage Lake. For
married couples. $45 per month.
Phone Hunter 3-0794. )C80
2 ROOM SUITE for 2 with piano, kitch-
en and laundry privileges-near cam-
pus. NO 2-7990. )C78
BRAND NEW 3 man apt. Electric
kitchen, disposal, air cond. $28. NO 5-
5909. )C79

STUDENT for mealrjob at fraternity. TWO-ROOM furnished apartment. ;ri-
NO 2-5649, steward. )H81 vate bath; couple preferred; 85 per
______________________________ month. NO 2-0342. Call after 5. )C71

..YRO JANS

Instead of
SOLOMON
Who is 111
THUR. 8:30
F E B. 21
Choral Union Series
HILL
Auditorium

ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD at Michigan Co-op 315 North
State. 3 meals a day. $8.75 and (412)
hours work per week. Call NO 8-6284.
House president. )E18
BOARDERS WANTED - good food.
Near campus, reasonable rates. Call
Bob Fisk, NO 2-8312. )E17
BORDERS WANTED - Tappan Inter-
national House, NO 5-5703. )E13
ROOMS FOR RENT
TWO SPACES for graduate girls avail-
lable at Tappan International House.
Room and board. 724 Tappan or call
NO 5-5703. )E12
BOARDERS WANTED - Good food,
reasonable rates. Call Brad Barr, NO
2-9431. )E10
LOOKING FOR a male grad student
to share room with cooking privi-
leges, half block from campus, 417
E. Liberty. ) D58
SAVE YOUR ROOM RENT: Single
basement room in exchange for sit-
ting and yard work. Private bath
and entrance. Mile from campus.
NO 3-5348. )D57
SINGLE ROOMS with refrigerator for
men near campus. Student managed.
906 Greenwood, NO 2-9851. )D56
ONE BLOCK from campus. Large 3
room apartment. Also one man to
share apartment with three, same.
location. Phone NO 2-1443. )C74
PLEASANT ROOMS near campus for
male students. Considerate landlord!l
Call NO 8-7683. )D53
GOOD campus location. Double rooms.
Neat and comfortable. Save money,
$5.50 per week. Phone NO 8-6205 or
NO 2-0035. )D49
ROOMS for 1 or 2 men in large, clean,
2 room suite close to campus. Call
NO 2-5180 or NO 3-0885. )D47
TWO LARGE double rooms for men
students. $7. 406 Packard across from
South Quad. Call NO 3-4096. )D54
LARGE, clean 2 room suite for working
girls or women students. Call NlO 3-
0885. )D48

BUSINESS SERVICES
RE-WEAVING--Burns, tears, moth holes
re-woven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)J2
TEACHER OF PIANO and music theory,
master's degree, formerly on college
music faculty. NO 3-4010, 4-5 p.m.
only. )J50
WASHING AND IRONINGS done in my
home. Reasonable price. Free deliv-
ery. Phone NO 5-2376. )J49.
TEACHER of Singing and Speaking.
Mrs. Kenneth N. Westerman, NO 8-
6584. )J47
CHILD DAY CARE -- Licensed home.
Northwest location. References. Call
NO 2-0410. )J46
WASHINGS-Also ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO 2-9020. )J23
PERSONAL
J-HOP PICTURES: Stragglers may
pick up pictures this Friday, Feb. 22,
at the Union between 3-5 p.m. )F141
Dressmaking
Tailoring, restyling. Will do fitting in
your home or mine. Experienced,
minimum charges. NO 5-6370.
Pick-up and Delivery
)F138
NEW LOCATION MARGARET SHOP-
Uniforms and furs, up to 50% off.
Fur tricks for spring styling. 516 E.
Liberty, NO 5-5729. )F142
DRESSMAKER
Mending - Alterations. Phone NO 2-
9541 . )F137
NEW LOCATION-MARGARET SHOP
has moved. Uniforms and furs up to
50% off. Restyling. 516 E. Liberty,
NO 5-5729. )F139
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted, $18, or new silk
shawl collar, $25. Write to Michaels
Tailoring Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit,
Michigan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )F1

USED CARS
USED CAR SPECIALS
1954 Chevrolet fordor; radio and
heater, powerglide, exceptionally
nice, $745.
1949 Ford; I owner, tudor, black,
radio and heater. $175.
1953 Dodge V8, tudor, blue, a car
well worth $200 more. Our price
$495.
JIM WHITE Inc.
Your Chevrolet Dealer
Open 'til 9 P.M. Daily, Sat. 'til11 P.M.
2 Big Lots-Cor. Washington and First
Sts. and Cor. Ashley and Liberty Sts.
Phones NO 2-5000, NO 3-6495, NO 3-3321
)N94
1947 PLYMOUTH - 4 door sedan, good
motor, radio and heater, $75. NO 8-
6662 between 5-6. )N95
USED CARS
MIDWINTER
SPECIAL
1953 Pontiac Deluxe 8; tudor sedan,
radio, heater, hydramatic. Spe-
cial at $795.
1953 Pontiac Deluxe 8 ystation
wagon, radio, heater, hydra-
matic, low mileage, one owner
car.
1950 Studebaker; tudor, radio, heat-
r, overdrive, good transporta-
tion. $165.
1955 Chevrolet V-8 Bel Air; tudor
radios and heater, exceptional-
ly clean. $1,395.
KLI NGLER
PONTIAC, INC.
2500 Jackson
at Stadium Blvd.
Phone NO 2-3221
Open 8:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
)N97
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
Weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales, Inc., 514 E. Washington St.
NO 3-4156.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Working mechanism to ULYSSE
NARDIN watch on 2/8. Please con-
tact NO 3-8508. Reward offered.
Maury Gralnek )A89
LOST--One pair black patent pumps.
If found call NO 2-5570. ) A90
LOST - Light brown leather purse be-
tween S.U. and School of Education,
contains Schaffer pen, check book
and important keys. If found please
call NO 2-1165 after six. )A91
LOST - Parker 41 pen blue gray
bottom of steel cap. Reward NO 8-
6683. )A92
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY: 1956 Michiganen-
sian, write L. B. Harper, 402 Strauss
Building, Fort Wayne, Indiana. )K8
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
TIRE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard - NO 8-9429
)852
For the Best in
Tires, Batteries, and Service
see
"HOB" GAINSLEY
SERVICE
So. University & Forest
)49
BY COMMAND I
Internatin*
FestYI of MUSIC
SSTARRING

direct from England
TED
HEATH
and his MusiC
LONDON RECORDS

FOR SALE
BALDWIN PIANOS
Acrosonic Spinets
Used spinets and uprights
Maddy Music
508 E. William
NO 3-3223 )B210
GIRL'S ENGLISH BICYCLE, practically
new, excellent condition. NO 2-836.
)B227
STOP THOSE
STUDYING BLUES
With all that homework
And most of it bunk,
Relax with our baked goods
We know you won't flunk.
CAMPBELL & SON BAKERY
219 N. Main Call NO 8-9880
Order now - we deliver
)B231
MOVING to new location, must sacri-
fice old furniture: 6 desks, 5 four
drawer file cabinets, sofa, 1 *Wsp
chair, 18 wooden chairs, 2 fire ex-
tinguishers, 1 water cooler, 5 oablea
125 hole mailbox. Please contact LeW
Engman NO 8-8668 or Mrs. Calihan
Univ. ext. 2602 before Wednesday
evening. The furniture will be sold
on Thursday afternoon. )B228
HI Fl STUDIO
Specials on new and used:
Short wave radios
Tape recorders
Short wave communications receivers
Table model Hi Fi phonographs
1217 & 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595 )B225
1948 STUDEBAKER Convertible, all
accessories, goad condition, call NO
3-8961 after 5 P.M. )B229
MEN'S ENGLISH BIKE, good condi-
tion, $30. 607 E. Ann, Apt, 1. )B224
wool throw rugs - assorted color
27x18-$1.00 and 27x54-43.95
While they last
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERING
207 Washington
NO 3-5536
Open Monday evening until 8:30
)B223
33 PT. RIVER diamond ring for 70%
of value. References. R. E, Taylor,
120 N. Ingalls. )B216
CAR FOR SALE-1952 Mercury Mon.
teray hard top R&H. New white wail
tires. Overdrive. Private owner. Phone
NO 2-3522 evenings after six. )B230
CAMERA SPECIAL-Argus C-3 Camera,
with case and flash, Reg. $69.50, No
$49.95. Complete line Photographic
supplies, cameras, etc. Purchase from
PURCHASE Camera Shop, 1116 $,
University, Phong NO 8-6972. )B219
DIAMOND RINGS-Complete selection
of wedding rings, bands, birth stone
rings and men's diamond rings. 55%
off. Direct from factory. We can not
be beat. Written guarantee. Money
refunded if not satisfied. At NO 2-
2684. )B191
HI FI
" Bozak Garrard Fairchild
* Electro-voice * Connoisseur
" Fisher * Rek-O-Kut AR-
" Dyna-Kit
Hours: Mon - Fri.: Noon - 8 P.,
Sat.: 9 - 1
Audio Supply Lab, showrooms
334 Nickels Arcade
(above Bay's Jewelry)
NO 2-7767 NO 2-9425
)B221
MONKEYS $35 ea.
Tropical fish, ragmop guinea pigs,
hamsters, parakeets, baby turtles,
aquariums and supplies,
University Aquarium
328 E. Liberty NO 3-0224
Open daily except Thursday
)B220
ARMY-NAVY type' Oxfords - $7.25;
socks, 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies. A S

A

c

CINCINNATI ORCHESTRA- FEB. 26
BOSTON POPS - MAR. 3 (2:30)
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA - MAR. 10
MAY FESTIVAL -- MAY 2, 3, 4, 5

I,

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Tonight at 8:30
BARBARA WARD
England's most Influential Newswoman
Noted Economist and Author
"The Unity of the Free World"

I

SAM'S STORE
122 East Washington

)B205

r

Decca Records Star

I

1

AL
HIBBLER1
with
JNE
CHRISTY
CAPITOL RECORDS
extra added Attraction
EDDIE "Snet"
HEYWOOD
TRIO

Dial NO 2-3136
ENDING TONIGHT
'Susan "irk
Hayward and Douglas
are having a
"Top SecretAffhr
"esO vgo ev WARNER BROIS.
Wednesday
THE COOL COMBO--
"DON'T KNOCK THE
ROCK"
and
"RUMBLE ON THE DOCK"
First Show Today 1 P.M.
Dial NO 2-2513
For Exact
Laughter Time
Even funnier than the
Pulitzer Prize play!
Marion BRANDO
Glenn FORD
Machiko KYO
in M-G-M's
oTh T::ho

1

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