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February 17, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-17

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1957
2,000 YEARS' AGO:

-

,Ill

rAGF,'iLE

~J tIC N II .V PAGE THREE

b

_.. 5 w - __ , . _r "

for Amercan

Am Pstle

.. .r1t I Vii ' cnna ,./ ' ~

4.-

r (EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
In *a series of nine articles concerning
the atom, atomic energy, its utiliza-
tion and the important scientists
who contributed to the advancement
of the atomic age.)
$. BY GERALD LUNDY

I

lation of Democritus its-,c riec.
Democritus had surmi.1ed-tht it
a substance, any substan, cou
be -divided and re-divided oe
and over again eventually an x
tremely minute particle weold be

We are living in Year XII of the reached which w ould be indivi-
Atomic Age, but how many of* us sable or atomos - hence LIhe word
know how this age had its begin-atm
nings in times passed, of the men Democritus said, all substanpes
andl women, who, in tireless en- from the air to fire is omioe of
deavor, contributed toward its! these atoms which are indcv dua
advent? Pits of constantly mnoving ate
Many people are content to con- in the shape of little balls or c
sider the discovery of atomic en- more irregular structure.
ergy as a purely American accom- The philosopher sad thiat mt
plishment, a not unusual fact due ter such as air or waris mad
to nationalistic attitudes and the up of the 'ball-type' atom xhk
American part in development of explains fluidity, the balls being
the A-bomb.! able to readily slip over eachiitIS-
How many would be surprised er to produce a flowving mocttion or
S to find that the atom is also the current.
product of international minds asI The sage also saiid that the
well as American? 1 atoms of substances such as rock
How many know that the first, or metal are the rough, ir~ue
theory formulated concerning the' atoms that fit tight ly thr
existence of the atom wasn't 100 thus explaining the ,_trerel nd
or 200 years ago but over two roughness of metals atnd;'tone ts
thousand years ago? and like substances.
Historically, the ancient Greek Democritus believed that-, all
philosopher Democritus was the materials of the sanme kind have
first man to speculate on the exis- the same type of atom invariably,
t ence of the atom although he had and this atom is indestr:uctible,
no empirical evidence to support always remainingf he me
his then radical and strange the- This in essence is the7fist b-
ories.; mulated theory on tee<istnc
People today would probably be of the atom, excellet mato
inclined to chuckle over some as-, the intellectual, debates inwhc
pects of this first atomic theory.I the Greek philosophersI''dso
But in essence the main postu- much to indulge.
Union GroupTo Inve<
aForeign Studentbter

I _ warobablyinoefthe
iL '~in'~ it~~t Dr - >, te
ry itits gae~st_-, Frnie o
ther pe rso o he co-:
mostevey feldofcne morea
Contrad imi D cmo c rhit us K-
mater.x sLompo ferse of miute
C ar.iel'T of matt,,ere how could1".1
matter' l Yr ikecdsoe roe
onver3the early2 0y
Thus theatheoryc.of Democritit
?tas iele and for-ii:gott1 fe as the
w)o.probably as donetmoe toa
ender it. Lnafterhis hookhs
allopt re .rding _them a f trudhe
tin, hidrnth duneo
etnd esonDemcrisd' atothe iory
o~af c' itenWn h id -ditI
to e hiudto av- ieiwllhm
(O ,i nl fa mgi wsrvd.
agin( asiehtly md ii~e for
tIyc -assend ,' an o ,r' I't' ih (0
laevedctaealthin kiat o-

Ifon Dtoese Tn PI eeh
and lise'
(rtimy, t -r: --Xlerm.so
tvi s lk, : iedi, ad~'ss
byn neud cm t so c ,}c3f
mu xChnton". son" -Ao

~~r acI~ 4 X so. i
,. -,

Festivalzad other nearby places-
ofitrit For well qualified stu-u
dens naleto attend the school
xx thotinancial assistance, eigh t
tuitin saolarships are available.
I,'teCested students may apply
throuhitheInstitteof Inter-
_atnlTicto in New York ;
Cite orthrw~hits reg-ional offices l
in Cicao. SanFrancisco, Hous-
ton . Denver nd Washington. D.C.
Appliction for scholarships
mut be retuirned to the Institute.
by, April 15; for general admission,
byJune 15.

1'
r'

III
2) Toay at8:00 Only
xA/ith
JDY GARLAND GENE KELLY
~ Archini'turo Auditorium5O

The Union International Sub-
committee has, been formed to
"investigate integrating' foreign
students into the American stu-
dent body and to develop the
Union's potential role in this area."
Donald Young, '58, chairman of
the subcommittee, described the
organization's work as.. decidingI
"whether there is a need in this
area, and if so, what should be
A purpose of the International
Subcommittee is to investigate the
possibility of establishing a per-
manent International Committee
as a part of the Union Student
Offices, Young added.
Future project areas which are
being investigated by the subcom-
mittee include an "American
brother system whereby there
would be means available for
foreign and American students to
establish close contacts."
This system would be set up in

ties, and graduate schools, Yoting '
said.
The Union subcommittee is also
considering a booklet explain ing
"existing problems, attitudes, and
habits" to meet students' concerns
"on both sides of the picture." The,
E booklet would be sent to .-incoem-
ing freshmen - both foreign and
American.-

tU,3E SD AYs, 8:30 P.MtO.

9'
~"'~' IS
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For classes or for dates,
in pastel shades, solid or striped.
16.95 to 22.95
FOR TOWN AND COLLEGE
302 South State Street

..

Bil TU~Ar2
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'Residence Nall Competition
Prizes for Winning lndividucils and Their Houye

S
e

Tickets - $1 .50, $1 .00, 50c
On Sale At Auditorium Box Office Tomorrow and Tuesday

}k'

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